Archive for February, 2011

Swiss goes pop in Düsseldorf

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011


Zeitgeist & Glamour: The decades of the jet set

February 5th – May 15th, 2011, NRW Forum Düsseldorf, Germany

Diane Arbus, Eve Arnold, Richard Avedon, David Bailey, Harry Benson, Guy Bourdin, Raymond Depardon, Terence Donovan, Elliott Erwitt, Ron Galella, Dennis Hopper, William Klein, Robert Mapplethorpe, Billy Name, Terry O’Neill, Bob Richardson, Jeanloup Sieff, Francesco Scavullo, David Bailey, Lord Snowdon, Bert Stern (Bert Stern’s Twiggy, VOGUE, 1967. © Bert Stern. See above)… just some of of the photographers, whose work is represented in this exhibition, many of whom were or became, alongside the glamorous subjects they followed from the Côte d’Azur, St. Moritz, Paris, London, Rome, and New York– among them, Brigitte Bardot, Jackie Kennedy, Maria Callas, Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Mick Jagger, Karl Lagerfeld – jet-setters themselves.

On show are 400 photographs, never exhibited before in public, from the Swiss collector Nicola Erni that collectively capture the unique zeitgeist of the 2oth century’s Swinging 60s and early 70s – Warhol’s Factory, Studio 54, Swinging London, Blow up, Pop Art, sex, drugs and rock‘n’roll – as seen through the lens of famous portrait and fashion photographers. Individually, each of these was creating new styles of photography, developing new techniques and forms of presentation that shaped the visual culture of the era. The paparazzi (See picture above – which may well have been the product of a prior arrangement between and in the interests of both subject and photographer(s) – by Giacomo Alexis: Un gelato in faccia di Rino Barillari da Sonia Romanoff in Via Veneto, Roma, 1970. © Giacomo Alexis) are represented, too; a new breed of photographer, who took pictures of famous personalities in their private lives and sold them to whichever newspaper and magazine bid the highest.

Were you around in the 60s & 70s? What do/did you think about all this stuff?
Please leave a comment

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Spring is sprung

Friday, February 18th, 2011

Easton Walled Garden: Snowdrops

Spring is creeping through what remains of last year’s autumn leaves – that winter covered in deep snow and transformed into sodden mulch – manifesting itself in shows of pure white snowdrops, yellow aconite and purple crocus. Easton Walled Garden, just off the A1, in Lincolnshire, where we broke the return journey south, having made an impromptu visit to the North East England, has a wonderful display of spring flowers. My image, above, will be available shortly via The Garden Collection, where you can see many more of my garden photographs.

Do Snowdrops do it for you? Please leave a comment

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Comme ci, comme ça

Friday, February 11th, 2011

Coco Chanel: The Legend and the Life
Justine Picardie, HarperCollins 2010, 352 pp hardback

In the middle of a deep recession, one must cut one’s cloth accordingly, and, despite the noise and general acclaim surrounding the publication of Justine Picardie’s biography of Coco Chanel, I didn’t feel like laying out £25 to buy a copy last September, when it was published. I was very pleased (after having dropped a few hints) to receive one as a Christmas present. Picardie, who took 8 years to research and write this very stylish book is not merely a fashion writer – she was once Features Director at British Vogue – but a proper journalist, for the book involved a tremendous amount of research. With hindsight, I should have been glad to pay £25 of my own money for it.

As is made clear, Chanel consorted with the Moderns: Picasso, Cocteau, Dali, and financed Diaghilev’s, avant-garde, Ballet Russes. She was influenced by what she saw them doing but, ever the hard-nosed businesswoman, extracted only the elements which she considered might have commercial value and could be applied to her design work at that particular point in time. ‘Fashion,’ she said, ’should die and die quickly, in order that commerce may survive…’. For the beautiful villa she began building in 1929, La Pausa – incidentally, currently up for sale at €11,200,000, I discovered during my own research for this review – at Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, high up in the Alpes Maritimes, with views towards the Mediterranean and Monaco and overlooking the rocky coastline below, in amongst which Eileen Gray’s (1924) radical and uncompromisingly modern villa, E-1207, perches, Chanel chose the Belle Epoque style. Perhaps she regarded Modernism as just another fad.

Mademoiselle Chanel’s reputation for contradiction is well-documented in the book – she altered not only her date of birth in her passport but her early biographical details, too, giving whatever version best suited her purpose at any given moment – and bearing this in mind, Patrick Budge’s smart and elegant design for the HarperCollins book package can be construed as consistent. Incidentally, the book’s cover font is in sans serif on Justine Picardie’s blogspot page, as opposed to the serif font version on the cover above.

Did you read it? What did you think? Please leave a comment

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Stop it and buy one

Friday, February 4th, 2011

The VIP Art Fair
January 22nd – 30th. See ‘A Very Private View’, posted on January 22nd, 2011

Unlike at a certain gallery in Dresden, which was so crowded that Dostoyesky leapt up on to an attendant’s chair – much to the embarrassment of his wife and to the anger of the attendant on his return – to get a look at a particular painting he was interested in getting a good look at, there was no crowd at The VIP Art Fair, or perhaps only an invisiblel one, and I missed physically going the private view and the customary offer of a glass of wine.

Despite all the tremendous efforts of the VIP Art Fair organisers: their assiduous attention to other details; the daily bulletins; the walk and talk interviews with international art collectors describing their purchases and the reasons behind them; the very well-designed website with its virtual galleries – they even put in little figures to give a sense of scale – which I could scroll through at my own pace, lingering if I wanted to or hurrying by if I wasn’t interested or was pushed for time – I could zoom in on any art piece that caught my eye and bring a detail up to full screen – art online just didn’t do it for me.

Did anyone else attend? What did you think? Please leave a comment

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