Archive for March, 2015

Photography | Lee Friedlander’s Little Screens

Friday, March 27th, 2015

All images by Lee Friedlander from The Little Screens series
Estimate $200/300,000



Sotheby’s
New York City | USA
Photographs
Exhibition until 31 March 2015
Sale 1 April 2015



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Paul Strand’s unique and beguiling Rebecca platinum print will lead Sotheby’s New York’s April 1st Photographs sale. The auction also includes a complete up-to-date set of Nicholas Nixon’s extended portrait series The Brown Sisters – 40 photographs taken annually between 1975 and 2014 in 8 x 10 inch format. However, Lee Friedlander’s The Little Screens – a suite of 38 photographs selling as a single lot – steals the show.

In our post, Lee Friedlander: America By Car / The New Cars, about the 2011 exhibition at London’s Timothy Taylor Gallery, we observed that, ‘The compositional references suggest the montages of Richard Hamilton.’ The Little Screens is a good illustration of the artists’ singular approaches to the creation of images of similar situations with comparable subject matter, and the way in which their perspectives differed. Hamilton’s colourful collage, Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956), in which the living space around the body-builder male figure and his pin-up, parasol-hatted partner, is choc-full with up-to‑the-minute furniture and contemporary household must-haves: the vacuum cleaner, tinned ham, a tape recorder, the tropical plant and of course the TV, with its black and white image. For The Little Screens series Friedlander reverses the emphases, depopulating each snatch and broader portion of otherwise banal, dimly lit American interior, making the bright, close-cropped image on the TV the star, and only sign of life. It’s interesting to note too, that, although all-colour prime-time television became available throughout the USA in 1966, Friedlander – who would, in the 1980s, choose to shoot a series on Japanese cherry blossom in monochrome – stuck resolutely to black and white photography for The Little Screens, which he created throughout the course of the 1960s.


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European Modernism is also well-represented in Sotheby’s Photographs in works by László Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray and Pierre Dubreuil. A print of Richard Avedon’s Marilyn Monroe will feature alongside Irving Penn’s Rock Groups. Among a long and varied list of lots, contemporary works by Robert Rauschenberg, Larry Sultan and Olafur Eliasson will also be sold. A selection of 38 images from The Little Screens – the largest group ever to come to auction and a far greater number than appear on Lee Friedlander’s gallerist, the Fraenkel Gallery’s website, which otherwise carries a substantial cross-section of the photographer’s work – are included in the sale and viewing exhibition.

All images from the Collection of C David & Mary Robinson. Courtesy Sotheby’s



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The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Art | Events Around the Eclipse of Capitalism

Friday, March 20th, 2015

OX, Untitled, 2013
Besançon 2013, Festival Bien Urbain Besançon



OX, Untitled, 2013
Besançon 2013, Festival Bien Urbain Besançon

Acrylic on petrol station



OX Public Posters
Edited by Andreas Ulrich
International Neighborhood Verlag

Text in German + English + French
308 pp, landscape, hardback
Available now

+

Rirkrit Tiravanija.
Berlin Billboards
On view at the following sites:
Messedamm 22, Berlin-Charlottenburg,
Prinzenstrasse 81, Berlin-Kreuzberg,
Wilhelmstrasse 111, Berlin-Tiergarten,
Leipziger Strasse 54, Berlin-Mitte,
Berlin | Germany

Until 18 April 2015

+

Art for All.
Multiples, graphics,
and political campaigns
from the Staeck Collection
Akademie der Künste
Berlin | Germany
Until 7 June 2015

+

Poetry of the Metropolis.
The Affichistes
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany

Until 25 May 2015

+

Peter Liversidge:
Notes on Protesting
Whitechapel Gallery
London | UK

Until 14 June 2014



OX, Untitled, 2004, Paris



OX, Untitled, 2009, Champagne-sur-Seine



OX, Untitled, 2008, Paris



OX, Untitled, 2005, Bagnolet



OX
OX (French, b 1963) finds a lot of graffiti tantamount to visual pollution, ‘plain ugly… badly placed, or just boring.’ He calls himself a painter, but says self-deprecatingly, ‘I am well aware that there is a difference between me and the master painters.

OX doesn’t like to talk much about his work. Nor does he title any of it. He prefers to let it speak for itself. ‘It isn’t interesting to watch me paint, either… I produce, I do colouring… watching me paint is very [tiring].’

OX’s medium is, for the most part, collage, albeit using paper he has first painted in his studio. A former member of the Paris-based 1980s art school guerilla collagist group Les Fréres Ripoulin, he and his associates were never certain whether gluing their work on to advertising billboards around Paris was illegal, but got an adrenalin rush from the idea that it might be. They even risked scribbling contact telephone numbers on their finished pieces and, never bothered by the police, were rung up by journalists and invited to exhibit at Paris’s recently-opened Agnes B gallery. However, after an unsuccessful New York show the group disintegrated in 1994.

OX used much of the next 10 years for quiet reflection. The work he began producing in 2004 – based around his cutting away all of the photographs on magazine pages but preserving the remaining fragments – was ‘like the opposite of pop art… Instead of using the most visible symbols of the visual commercial realm, I used only the outlines, the backgrounds, the most visually weak elements.’ For source material, he collected pictures from the discarded magazines he found in rubbish bins. These days he searches the internet for images to add to his archive, and increasingly uses Google Street View to find locations. Either the billboard itself gives rise to the idea, or its location.

OX, Untitled, 2009, Paris



OX, Untitled, 2013, Dammerie-les-lys



OX likes to take his time. After deciding on a site, he will observe it often for long periods and in different weather conditions, waiting sometimes several months, or even years, before choosing a billboard on which to execute the idea he has formulated. He likes the temporary nature of his ’signs’, which he documents by photographing them, and claims he is not attached to the originals that can be gone within a few days. However, he might return at a later date to revise a ’sign’, if it’s still there.

OX is prolific. Except for a few earlier examples, the photographs shown in the new book OX Public Posters, published by International Neighborhood Verlag and distributed by Gestalten, are selected from the three hundred or so paintings he has placed on public billboards around the world from 2004 to 2014. Those shown, together with many other images of his work can be found on OX’s Blog.

+ Rirkrit Tiravanija. Berlin Billboards
Inspired by economic theorist Jeremy Rifkin’s book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society: the Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, Open Source: Art at the Eclipse of Capitalism is a series of connected events occurring at the Max Hetzler galleries in Berlin and Paris, plus a theatre performance at the New Theater in Berlin, as well as a lecture by Jeremy Rifkin at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, which will be followed by an interview with Rifkin by Hans Ulrich Obrist, to appear both online and in a forthcoming book based on the exhibition. The object of the series is to consider artworks made since 1990 to the present which reflect economic transition. Exhibitor Rirkrit Tiravanija (b Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1961) is a contemporary artist living between New York, Berlin, and Chiang Mai. In his video Ghost Reader, 2013, Tiravanija uses the manga character Annlee – who appears on the artist’s Berlin billboards – to explore the complex issues of copyright, identity, status and emotion in our rapidly changing society.

+ Art for All. Multiples, graphics, and political campaigns
Beginning in the 1960s, when artists sought independence from existing institutions, and wanted to create affordable art for as wide an audience as possible, the Art for All movement, which is still active today and has included international figures, such as Joseph Beuys, Christo, Sigmar Polke and Rosemarie Trockel, began producing multiples – original works of art reproduced in large quantities that circumvented the rules of traditional art, making it accessible to everyone. Art for All: Multiples, graphics, and political campaigns exhibition at the Akademie der Künste presents graphics, objects and art books from the Staeck Collection, by numerous artists working in a diverse variety of styles and aesthetic approaches, and offers insights into a non-conformist creative generation. During a period of profound social upheaval, these artists put their trust in the critical, enlightening and utopian powers of art, while permanently contributing to the shape of its formal language.

+ Poetry of the Metropolis. The Affichistes
Pioneers of new realism, early pop artists, street art trailblazers – on their rambles through postwar Paris, the artists who would become known as the Affichistes collected fragments of the weathered and tattered posters, they came across that were often peeling and several layers deep, carried them back to their studios and created original artworks from them, in doing so elevating this ubiquitous aspect of everyday urban life to the status of a fine art. Poetry of the Metropolis: The Affichistes, is an extensive exhibition at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, which shines a light on the special role of the subversive and poetic Affichistes within the avant-garde of the 1950s and1960s.

+ Peter Liversidge: Notes on Protesting
Inspired by demonstration and protest, British artist Peter Liversidge (b1973) worked closely with sixty London schoolchildren, to produce a performance staged at the Whitechapel Gallery, on May Day (01 May 2014). Creating songs, choreography, banners and placards, they expressed their views on everything from ‘No More Homework’ to ‘Less trucks and cars. More chocolate bars!’ Peter Liversidge: Notes on Protesting at the Whitechapel Gallery includes a film of the performance, alongside documentation of the workshops and rehearsals.

All images from OX Public Posters / Affichage Libre / Public Posters
All images courtesy Gestalten
All images © OX and Wildsmile Studios, Dresden





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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Art | Beatriz Milhazes takes Rio to Hong Kong

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Turkish garden, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



Beatriz Milhazes
White Cube Hong Kong
Hong Kong
People’s Republic of China
13 March > 30 May 2015



Beatriz Milhazes
Photo Christian Gaul



Beatriz Milhazes’ studio, where she has worked since 1987, is adjacent to Rio de Janeiro’s botanical gardens, and for this latest series of mixed media works, the artist has allowed the exuberant jungle foliage to creep inside, to spread over and mingle with her collection of collaging materials, carrying choice finds along with it to decorate – with her helping hand – the surfaces of the cardboard sheets she uses as her baseboard, thereby producing a group of multi-layered, remarkably vibrant works – a unique abstracted celebration of 21st century Brazil’s tropical splendour and the natural world – opulent compositions which blend mix all manner of influences, most noticeably in this instance from Matisse – in cut-out mode – whose presence extends across much of the show, and is perhaps most apparent in the combination of colours and cut-out shapes in O passeio, (The ride, or The tour).

Yellow sunshine, 2014
Mixed media – Collage of various papers
and acrylic paint on cardboard



Referencing the collage technique invented by the early 20th century cubists, Turkish garden, includes chocolate wafer biscuit wrappers, cut into leaf shapes, as well as rose-patterned, holographic, spotted and striped wrapping papers. The central, river-like horizontal axis of Yellow sunshine gives more than a nod to Sonia Delauney, and in Jardim Kadiwéu (Garden of the Kadiwéu) Milhazes pays homage to local and world-famous painter, printmaker, ecologist, naturalist, artist, musician and landscape architect, Roberto Burle Marx – designer of the undulating op art Copacabana promenade mosaic (completed 1970). Elsewhere, Emilio Pucci patterns reflecting 1960s and 70s glamour overlay radiant colours and textures suggestive of the wild exuberance of the Rio carnival.

Jardim Kadiwéu, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



O Passeio, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



Beatriz Milhazes (b 1960 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) has had numerous international solo exhibitions, including those at Pérez Art Museum / Miami /USA (2014 > 2015), Museu Oscar Niemeyer / Curbita / Brazil (2013), Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation / Lisbon / Portugal (2011), Fondation Cartier/ Paris / France (2009). In 2003, she represented Brazil at the Venice Biennale. As well as the forms and patterns of flowers and leaf shapes that find their way into her painting and mixed media oeuvre, Milhazes has incorporated the rich atmosphere of Rio via its cheap, colourful fabrics and jewellery, its embroidery and folk art, and references to its rich and multi-facetted urban architectural mix.

Mysterious and dream-like, there is no real centre to one of her works. For Milhazes, composition is never static. She wants the viewer’s eyes to move continually across her creations, ‘…That way’, she says, ‘I feel like you have communication with the entire world.’ And, perhaps, in these works in her eponymous show Beatriz Milhazes at White Cube Hong Kong, her intention is to do just that. Beneath the obvious ostentation, there would seem to lurk a far less frivolous intention. Through what might appear as her blithe inclusion of elements such as the mass-produced and ubiquitously discarded, biscuit wrappers, her purpose may be to draw attention, however subliminally, to the threat posed by man to his environment, in which much of the rarer flora is in danger of disappearing from the natural world, and is destined to survive only in our botanical gardens. Poignantly, the remaining 1,400 Kadiwéureferred to above in the title of the work Jardim Kadiwéu – are the last surviving group of Mbayá, a once large and powerful tribe that controlled large parts of Brazil and are now confined to life on a reservation.

All works © Beatriz Milhazes
All images Courtesy White Cube
All works photographed by Motivo,
except Yellow sunshine,
photographed by Pepe Schettino



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Illustration | Comic Art @ Serious Prices

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Nat Neujean, Tin Tin et Milou, 1976
Bronze, 180 cm
Estimate €140,000 > 180,000



Bande Dessinée / Comic Strip Art
Sotheby’s
Paris | France
Exhibition until 6pm today
Auction 7 March 2015



Blutch, Vous n’avez encore rien vu, 2012.
Poster for the film by Alain Resnais, 2012

Pastel on paper
Estimate €3,000 > 3,500



Gabriele del’Otto,
Amazing Spiderman 682,
Arc Ends of the Earth
, 2012.

Alternative cover illustration
Mixed media on paper
Estimate €4,800 > 5,000



Floc’h, Michelle Obama’s Fashion Show
Cover of The New Yorker’s
The Style Issue, 16 March 2009

Mixed media
Estimate €2,200 > 2,500



Like many of my peers during the latter years of the 1960s, in my teens I collected American comics. And I suppose because he was supposed to be a teenager too, DC Comics‘ Superboy was a particular favourite. Naturally I also liked Superman, Batman, and The Flash. I admired the Marvel Comics’ superhero Daredevil, who, even though he had been blinded by radiation – in the process gaining super powers – managed to look great and perform amazing feats. The Fantastic Four, Iron Man, Spiderman and Thor were more Marvel favourites, and I used to scare myself half to death with DC Comics’ Tales from the Crypt.

They had no connection to DC Comics, but I had grown up with DC Thomson & Co Limited’s children’s weeklies, The Beano, Topper and The Dandy, and later, The Victor and The Hotspur, and when I delivered newspapers, I always looked forward to reading the Oor Wullie strip in the Scottish paper The Sunday Post, before pushing it through one of my regular letterboxes. Oor Wullie means Our Willie. Originally created by DC Thompson editor R D Low in 1936, it was drawn for many years by Dudley D Watkins (1907 > 1969). Our Wullie’s trademarks are spiky hair, dungarees and an upturned bucket, which he often uses as a seat. When our own kids reached the right age, my wife and I regularly bought them Oor Wullie, and The Broons annuals for Christmas, which they – and we – read over and over again, and which their friends were always keen to borrow.

Hergé, Le petit vingtiéme.
Recto: Tintin, honneur au jubilaire.
Cover illustration, Le petit vingtième,
#49, 15 December 1938
Indian ink and white gouache on paper
Verso: Tintin, Fifth Anniversary
Journal Tintin Belgian #39,
26 September 1951.
Cover illustration rough
Pencil on paper
© Hergé-Moulinsart
Estimate €450,000 > 480,000



On trips to Paris, we always made a bee-line to FNAC in the rue de Rennes, spending hours leafing through the illustrated books, especially the Barbar stories, begun originally in 1931 by Jean de Brunhoff, who died in 1937, and continued from 1946 by his son Laurent (b 1925). Although they weren’t actually in comic book form, each story was constructed with lots of sequential, situational drawings. It was possible to ‘get’ the story, even without reading the French text – which neither of us could. Our other favourites were The Adventures of Tin Tin, created by Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi (1907–1983), who wrote under the pen name Hergé. I, at least knew these illustrators’ names and work, but there was a huge raft of contemporary illustrated comics and comic books available in the shop, full of the most amazing work, that wasn’t, to my knowledge at the time, to be got anywhere in the UK, except for a single, poky shop called Forbidden Planet, off Tottenham Court Road in central London. There had been others – Dark They Were, and Golden-Eyed, started in 1969, which had followed another called Weird Fantasy, but Forbidden Planet, founded in 1975, outlived them and today claims to be the world’s biggest chain of comic shops, with massive online sales. Now, as the Japanese manga phenomenon proliferates and the graphic novel becomes ever more popular, Sotheby’s Bande Dessinée / Comic Strip Art sale, tomorrow, is a timely opportunity to sample a broad, international cross section of the genre, via the exhibition, the sale, the online catalogue or the printed version, available via their website.

Jacques de Loustal,
Le Gardien 2013

Oil on canvas



Frank Miller, Sin City,
Volume 3, The Big Fat Kill
,
Vertige Graphic, 1996

Indian ink on paper
Estimate €15,000 > 18,000



Ana Miralles, Djinn
Novel illustration
Mixed techniques on paper
Estimate €12,000 > 15,000



On leaving university, my first job had been at The Sunday Times – at that point, incidentally, owned by DC Thompson. In my thirties and early forties, as Art Editor of The Sunday Times Magazine – a weekly supplement to the newspaper – I was probably commissioning more illustration than anyone else in magazines (except, perhaps the art editor at The Radio Times) in London. The Sunday Times Magazine didn’t run a cartoon strip, but when I was asked to redesign Watchword the children’s magazine of the Royal Society for Nature Conservation (which The Sunday Times supported) its editor was keen to have one in it. We settled on the idea of a girl and a boy who would make discoveries in the natural world together. I came up with their names: Flora & Fauna which became the strip’s title. I believe it ran for around five years. It was my first and only involvement with the commissioning of comic strip illustration.

All images courtesy Sotheby’s



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due must be borne by the source supplier



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