Archive for August, 2016

Art | Richard Deacon: Thinking & Drawing

Friday, August 5th, 2016

10.03.12, 2012
Ink and pencil



Richard Deacon
Drawings and Prints 1968 > 2016
Museum Folkwang
Essen | Germany
26 August > 13 November 2016



Untitled, 1975
Pen, pencil and paper collage



2D drawing would seem to be at the opposite end of the spectrum to 3D sculpture. Indeed, internationally acclaimed British sculptor Richard Deacon has, alongside sketches and studies for his 3D pieces, from early on in his career that spans for decades, produced drawings independently from his sculpture work.



Landscape Division, 2012
Woodblock on kozo
paper, collaged on Arches
watercolour paper



Best known for the large, lyrical open forms of his compact and large scale sculptures, combining organic forms with elements of engineering, Deacon constantly reveals new interpretations of the relationship between the perception of inside and outside, and of what is open and closed.



Inside Out #2, 2013
Marker and ballpoint pen



Some Interference 7.08.05 (1), 2005
Ink and pencil



Passionate about drawing, and in keeping with his deep-rooted interest in philosophy, Deacon believes it has a close relationship to thinking. And his parallel disciplines are not wholly unconnected either, one discernibly influencing the other.



London #5, 1998
R-type print with collaged
drawing of ink and pencil



Almost all the 150 items in Richard Deacon Drawings and Prints 1968 > 2016, this first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the artist’s graphic works, at Essen’s Museum Folkwang, which includes a selection of prints, have never been shown in public before.

All work © Richard Deacon, courtesy Museum Folkwang


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