Archive for December, 2016

Exhibition | Laura Wilson in the American West

Friday, December 30th, 2016

Donald Judd
Marfa, Texas,
November 3, 1993



That Day: Laura Wilson,
Pictures in the American West
Phillips
New York City | USA
Exhibition 3 January > 9 February 2017



Hutterite Boy on Appaloosa
Golden Valley Colony
Ryegate, Montana,
June 15, 1993



Hutterite girls during
haymaking season
Surprise Creek Colony,
Stanford, Montana,
August 22, 1991



When I first met her in 1992, Laura Wilson’s sons, Luke, Owen and Andrew Wilson destined – along with their friend Wes Anderson – to become huge Hollywood names, were unheard of. Meanwhile, her claim to fame was that from 1979 to 1985 she had assisted Richard Avedon on his epic journey to photograph 752 people in seventeen Western states for his In the American West project. Laura had since become established as a successful photographer in her own right in the US, where her photo book, Watt Matthews of Lambshead Ranch (Texas State Historical Association, 1989) had earned five major honours; she was now keen to spread her wings internationally.

To date I had found the hubristic attitude of many of the photojournalists with whom I’d come into contact, and whose work – however much I admired the images – was often interchangeable with that of their contemporaries, somewhat repellent. But here was someone quietly spoken, modest and polite, with a big box full of extraordinarily stylish and striking photographs that had little in the way of shock value, but which were as moving as any The Sunday Times Magazine – at the time, I was its deputy art director – had ever published.

The following year, having been promoted to the position of art director, with a brief to modernise the Magazine and to give it a more stylish edge, I wasted no time in commissioning Laura to shoot a portfolio of images of the artist Donald Judd (1928 > 1994). Judd’s untimely death would occur shortly before the issue that featured the story over 10 pages, appeared.

In 1997, by which time I was art director of the German edition of Elle, and Laura was shooting fashion for our direct competitor German Marie Claire, we met up in Munich. She was disgruntled with Marie Claire’s proposed layout of her pictures, and showed it to me. At the risk of losing my job, I secretly rejigged it for her, and everyone was happy.

Laura and I had become friends. We got together when I visited New York to attend the fashion shows and on her subsequent visit to Munich I invited her to my home; we drove up into the mountains together, where she kindly photographed my family and I.

Simone, Lesley, Natalie
and
Pedro Silmon
c 1998, on the Brauneck,
Bavaria, Germany



Some of the first images that she had shown me were of the Hutterites – a religious community Laura had already visited several times, that shuns the modern world and leads an isolated existence on large farms and ranches, on the prairies of Montana. In 1998, we decided to compile a book of the Hutterite material. Laura told me that she loved my layout proposal, and, in the middle of our discussion of the project’s logistics, I was invited to New York to talk about a job opportunity. Laura went with me to look at property in Greenwich, where – had things worked out – I proposed to live. During the trip, however, a personal misunderstanding occurred between us. Yale University Press subsequently published her book, Hutterites of Montana, in 2000; I was not the designer.

Our relationship deteriorated further after I commissioned Laura to take photographs of the tiny, independent island nation of Tuvalu in the South Pacific for Weltbild, one of several German magazines that, as creative director, I supervised from 1999 to 2001. She produced a wonderful set of images, but, sadly, I was on a family holiday when they were delivered; I had no hand in editing them, or any involvement in the disappointing layout that was published. But all that was a long time ago…

Cowboys Walking
J R Green Cattle Company,
Shackelford County, Texas,
May 13, 1997



Shiprock
Shiprock, New Mexico,
November 17, 2009



Among many other prominent magazines, Laura Wilson has worked for The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, British GQ, Wallpaper, and The Washington Post. Her book, Avedon at Work, was published by The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center/University of Texas Press, in 2003.

I would like to wish Laura the success she deserves for her forthcoming exhibition, That Day: Laura Wilson, Pictures in the American West at Phillips.

All photographs by and © Laura Wilson.
Images 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6, courtesy Phillips.
Image 4, writer’s own


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Art | Katharina Grosse: Untitled, 2016

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Untitled, 2016
Acrylic on canvas



Katharina Grosse
Gagosian
New York City
USA
19 January > 11 March 2017



Despite their being as urban as a concrete tower block and produced with a spray gun, Katharina Grosse’s sophisticated and exuberant works are far removed from the visceral graffiti that provided their initial inspiration. Each large-scale project or individual painting is executed with dexterity, and a great deal of subtle sensitivity and thought.

Untitled, 2016
Acrylic on canvas



Untitled, 2016
Acrylic on canvas



Well known for her temporary and permanent in situ work, directly painted on to interiors, architecture and even landscape, she also paints on canvas and, indeed, her creative process begins in the studio.

Grosse approaches painting as an experience in immersive subjectivity, in which choices of colour, density, and the velocity of her paint spraying are important considerations. The selection and positioning of the multiplicity of stencils that combine to produce the intricate layering she achieves might be consciously controlled during her creation process, but the end result – never predetermined – is dependent on chance and spontaneity.

The act of spraying places her constantly at a distance from the surfaces she paints. From this vantage point she sees them as ’screens between the producer and the spectator, on which both can view the thought processes residing on them from different angles and points in time.’

Untitled, 2016
Acrylic on canvas



Grosse (b 1961, Freiburg/Breisgau, Germany) currently lives and works in Berlin. Her eponymously titled Katharina Grosse, the artist’s first gallery exhibition at Gagosian in New York, follows a series of recent, significant US public and private commissions, and includes works from several interconnected groups of untitled paintings produced during the past twelve months, plus new, cast metal sculpture.

Untitled, 2016
Acrylic on canvas



Her work has been exhibited widely, and internationally, and is featured in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, in those of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, QAGOMA in Australia, Pérez Art Museum Miami, Istanbul Modern, and at Centre Georges Pompidou.

All works courtesy Gagosian © Katharina Grosse und VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016. All photos Jens Ziehe


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Illustration | Brian Eno meets Quentin Blake

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Brian Eno
‘What are you like?’
Estimate £1,000 > 1,500



English Literature,
History, Children’s Books
and Illustrations

Sotheby’s
London | UK
13 December 2016



Quentin Blake
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £3,000 > 5,000



An original illustration by the seemingly unlikely figure of Brian Eno will go on sale alongside contributions from the likes of Quentin Blake, Peter Brookes and Posy Simmonds at Sotheby’s London next week to support House of Illustration. On the set theme ‘What Are You Like?’, autobiographical contributions by leading, contemporary British illustrators, such as Lauren Child, Emma Chichester Clark, Peter Brookes, and Chris Riddell, along with fashion designers, Paul Smith and Margaret Howell, as well as Dr Who actor, Peter Capaldi, and pieces by fine artists David Shrigley and Peter Blake, are also on offer to the highest bidder.

Jeff Fisher
‘What are you like?’
Estimate £800 > 1,200



Peter Brookes
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £1,500 > 2,000



House of Illustration identifies and promotes new illustration talent, commissions new work and has a pioneering illustrator-led education and outreach programme. Set up in 2014, at the heart of the King’s Cross regeneration area, it is the UK’s only public gallery dedicated solely to illustration is a registered charity and receives no public funding. It needs to raise a substantial amount of money each year to fund illustrator-led learning work with schools, teachers, families, students and enthusiasts of all ages.

Bruce Ingman
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £1,000 > 1,500



Lauren Child
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £2,000 > 3,000



English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations at Sotheby’s, also includes rare and highly collectable items such as six handwritten manuscript copies of J K Rowling’s The Tales of Beedle the Bard, and a first edition copy of Jane Austen’s Emma.

All images courtesy Sotheby’s


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Books | The New Go-to Destination Airports

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

Kansai International Airport,
Osaka, Japan, 1994.
Renzo Piano Building Workshop.
Interior of terminal building
Photo Chris McGuire / Masterfile / Corbis



The Art of the Airport
The World’s Most Beautiful Terminals
By Stefan Eiselin, Laura Frommberg
and Alexander Gutzmer.
Published by Frances Lincoln
280 x 250mm
192 pp hardback
November 2016



Spaceport America,
New Mexico, USA, 2011.
Foster + Partners and SMPC Architects.
Terminal building
Photo Spaceport America



Their allure quite distinct from the cities they serviced – and far more interesting to experience than the flights that got you to and from them – classic air terminals such as JFK (particularly the TWA Flight Center or Trans World Flight Center designed by Eero Saarinen for Trans World Airlines in 1962) and Paul Andreu’s Terminal One at Paris Charles de Gaulle (1974) were go-to destinations in their own right.

To cope with the requirements of the unprecedented boom in international air travel of more recent decades, a rash of new and infinitely varied terminals have been constructed across the globe, some of them vast architectural tours de force: others, fascinating and sometimes quirky little gems.

Lleida-Alguaire Airport,
Lleida, Spain, 2010.
Fermín Vázquez Arquitectos.
Façade of control tower
Photo Joan Argelés



Wellington International Airport,
Wellington, New Zealand, redesign 2010.
Studio Pacific Architects, Warren & Mahoney.
Interior of ‘The Rock’ terminal
Photo Wellington International Airport



With his 1991 redesign of Stansted Airport, architect Sir Norman Foster had revolutionised airport design. Richard Branson turned to him to create Spaceport America (2011), his vision of the future. But while Spaceport America has yet to dispatch a single passenger, India’s Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport, designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merril, and opened in 2014, handles 35 million passengers per year.

Carrasco International Airport,
Montevideo, Uruguay, 2009.
Rafael Viñoly.
New terminal building
Daniela MacAdden



Queen Tamar Airport,
Mestia, Georgia, 2010.
Jürgen Mayer H and Partners.
Terminal building
Photo Marcus Buck, Munich



Shenhzen Bao’an International Airport,
Shenzhen, China, 2013.
Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas.
Terminal 3
Photo Leonardo Finotti



Lavishly illustrated, The Art of the Airport: The World’s Most Beautiful Terminals presents well-selected examples of some of the most interesting airport designs from the past 60 years in a clear, well-edited and well-organised format. It is a serious survey, but is not just a reference book. The expansive, high-quality and dramatic images are beautiful to look at, and the text, as well as being informative is easily accessible – usefully, the relevant facts and figures relating to each example are displayed at the start of each clearly-defined section, and often simplified versions of the architects’ drawings and plans are included to explain the designs.

All images courtesy Frances Lincoln


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin