Archive for February, 2017

Photography | Hello Éli Lotar

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Portrait of the Actress
Wanda Vangen
, 1929

Vintage silver gelatin print.
Centre Pompidou collection



Éli Lotar (1905 > 1969)
Jeu de Paume – Concorde
Paris | France
Until 28 May 2017



Untitled, [Journey aboard
the Exir Dallen]
, c 1933

Vintage silver gelatin print.
Gift of M Jean-Pierre Marchand.
Centre Pompidou collection



You may not have heard of Éli Lotar – until the 1990s, when the first major exhibition of the photographer and filmmaker’s work was presented at the Centre Pompidou, he had faded from public awareness. But in Paris, in the 1920s and 30s, Lotar, as this newshow at Jeu de Paume helps to re-establish further, was an important pioneer of modernist photography, respected by such contemporaries as Man Ray and László Moholy-Nagy.

Born in Paris, but brought in Bucharest, Lotar returned to France in 1924, and from 1927 to 1929 served as Germaine Krull’s apprentice. A generous teacher, Krull allowed him to share the use of her equipment. (Incidentally, Krull’s own huge contribution to 20th century photography went largely unrecognised until her 2015 retrospective at the Jeu de Paume.)

Photographing planes, boats, trains and the railways, Éli Lotar was inspired by modernity and often focussed his lens on the urban and industrial landscape of Paris and the Île-de-France. However, he was a keen traveller, too, and made numerous trips around France and the Mediterranean, returning with countless reportage images, particularly of maritime landscapes and port scenes.

Untitled [Lisbon], 1931
Vintage silver gelatin print.
Gift of M Jean-Pierre Marchand.
Centre Pompidou collection



Untitled [Tombros’ hand
with sea urchin]
, 1931

Vintage silver gelatin print.
Gift of M Jean-Pierre Marchand.
Centre Pompidou collection



Hôpital des Quinze-Vingt, 1928
Photomontage, vintage
silver gelatin prints.
Acquired thanks to
the sponsor Yves Rocher,
Former Christian
Bouqueret collection.
Centre Pompidou collection



Although he would never actually join it, he had a close association with the surrealist movement, and some of his most accomplished images, often featuring hands, exude a dream-like quality.

A regular contributor to Vu between 1928 and 1931, his images appeared in leading avant-garde publications of the time such as Jazz, Variétés, L’Art vivant, Documents, and Bifur.

In 1928, Lotar’s photographs were exhibited in Brussels alongside that of Berenice Abbott, André Kertész, Krull, Man Ray, László Moholy-Nagy, Eli Lotar, then in 1929, in the influential Fotografie der Gegenwart show, at Essen’s Museum Folkwang, featuring photography by all the prime modernist movers of the period, among them, Berenice Abbott, Herbert Bayer, André Kertész, Germaine Krull, El Lissitzky, Man Ray, László Moholy-Nagy, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Hans Richter, August Sander, Umbo (Otto Umbehr), Lucia Moholy and Karl Blossfeldt, which travelled throughout Germany as well as to Sweden and London.

His work also featured in the 1929 exhibition Internationale Ausstellung des Deutschen Werkbunds Film und Foto (FiFo) in Stuttgart organised by El Lissitzky, László Moholy-Nagy, Hans Richter, Edward Steichen and Edward Weston that travelled to Switzerland and Austria, and as far as Japan.

Draining of the Zuiderzee,
Netherlands, 1930
Vintage silver gelatin print.
Archives Tériade,
musée départemental Matisse,
Le Cateau-Cambrésis



Passionate about film, in the 1930s, Lotar was hired as a cinematographer for Luis Buñuel, although he continued to produce photography, often on the fringes of film sets. Turning to film direction himself in the 1940s, he was commissioned by the communist mayor of Aubervilliers to show the realities of the harsh living conditions of those who lived in the area under his jurisdiction. The eponymously titled film Aubervilliers (1945) is on show at Jeu de Paume during the exhibition.

Lotar developed close ties with many of the film stars and leading artists of his day. During his close friendship with Alberto Giacometti in the 1960s, he photographed the artist, while Giacometti sculpted Lotar. He was Giacometti’s last male model.

Éli Lotar (1905 > 1969) at Jeu de Paume – Concorde his first retrospective exhibition and features a selection of around 100 vintage prints.

All photographs by Eli Lotar, © Eli Lotar, courtesy Jeu de Paume


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Art | Drawing: an End in Itself

Friday, February 17th, 2017

Grayson Perry
Studio Afternoon, 2017
Ink, crayon and
graphite on paper



Drawing Biennial 2017
Drawing Room
London | UK
2 March > 26 April



Claudia Wieser
Untitled, 2016
Gold leaf, coloured
pencil and
coloured paper



For the majority of artists a drawing is not a finished item – it’s a visual note, a study, or a working rough leading towards something more complete that might be executed in another medium: a painting, a sculpture, a film, performance art, architecture. Nevertheless, as with those in this forthcoming exhibition, which includes A4 mounted works by 200 British and international artists of different generations, many of them well-known, such as Nidhal Chamekh, Michael Craig-Martin, Richard Deacon, Antony Gormley, Mona Hatoum, Chantal Joffe, Anish Kapoor, William Kentridge, Michael Landy, Humphrey Ocean, Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze, Julian Opie, Cornelia Parker, Grayson Perry, Gavin Turk, Julie Verhoeven, Yu Chen Wang, Mark Wallinger, Alison Wilding, and other less famous names, it can equally be an end in itself.

Richard Forster
Untitled, Levittown
Study
, 2014

Pencil and acrylic
medium on
Bristol board



Julian Opie
Beard,
headphones
, 2016

Vinyl on paper



Antony Gormley
SITE XXIII, 2016
Carbon and
casein on paper



Marcel van Eeden
No title, 2015
Black chalk on paper



Richard Deacon
4.11.16.1, 2016
Crayon and felt tip
pen on lino



Lubaina Himid
La Force, 2016
Pencil on paper



Drawing Biennial 2017 at Drawing Room is a free exhibition and culminates in an online auction in support of the gallery’s ongoing programme, with individual works available from £250.

All images courtesy Drawing Room © the artists


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Art | Drawing: a Place in Space

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Hermann Glöckner,
From the series: 3 Phases, 1980
Foldings, tempera on cardboard,
Deutsche Bank Collection
at
the Städel Museum,
Frankfurt am Main
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017



Into the Third Dimension:
Spatial Concepts on Paper from
the Bauhaus to the Present
Städel Museum
Frankfurt am Main | Germany
15 February > 14 May 2017



Globalisation has created a situation where, too often, the larger galleries and museums around the world choose to gather material from a wide variety of collections and private sources, which combine to produce blockbuster exhibitions that might have the advantage of being comprehensive, but lack any sense of place. This one is different.

Despite the work included having been produced by an international array of artists 13 artists, among them Argentine-born Lucio Fontana (founder, in Italy, in 1947 of the Spatialism (Spazialismo) movement), Spanish sculptor Eduardo Chillida, and the American artists, Sol LeWitt, who produced countless spatialist works in the latter decades of the 20th century and on into the 21st, and James Turrell, who, during the same period used projected light to create illusionary geometric bodies, the vast majority of it is drawn from the Museum’s own extensive holdings, which gives the show a strong local flavour.

El Lissitzky
Proun. Kestner Portfolio 1
(sheet IV), 1923
Lithograph
Städel Museum,
Frankfurt am Main



Sol LeWitt
Distorted Cubes (B), 2001
Lino cut
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017



Eduardo Chillida
Yunque de sueños VII
(Anvil of Dreams VII),
1954 > 1959

Iron and wood,
Städel Museum,
Frankfurt am Main
© Zabalaga-Leku /
VG Bild-Kunst,
Bonn 2017



It had been the cubists, in Paris in the early 1900s, sticking pieces of newspaper, wallpaper, tickets and packaging on to the paper or canvas surfaces on which they were working, who pioneered the spatial concept, but they soon moved on to pursue other interests. El Lissitsky, a Russian, and Hungarian Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, however, while both based in Germany during the 1920s, experimented extensively with spatial ideas, producing work that would have enormous, international impact. Important examples of these from the Städel’s permanent collection including Lissitsky’s Proun (1923) portfolio of graphic works, and Moholy-Nagy’s Constellations (1923) portfolio of prints, are used as an introduction to the exhibition.

László Moholy-Nagy
Construction, 1924
Oil on canvas
Permanent loan of
Commerzbank AG,
Frankfurt am Main



The Museum is also displaying a selection of works by important German spatial art masters, Hermann Glöckner (1889-1987) and Norbert Kricke (1922–1984), who were both strongly influenced by constructivism. Glöckner, was one of former East Germany’s leading abstract artists, who, from 1935 started to create collage-like, folded pieces that tested the notion of a shallow pictorial solid and foreshadowed 1960s minimalism, while in post-war Düsseldorf, Kricke began producing sculptures made from welded together metal rods that reached out dynamically into space.

The Third Dimension: Spatial Concepts on Paper from the Bauhaus to the Present at the Städel Museum might be dominated by works on paper, but, of course, due to the nature of its subject, also features sculpture and even some paintings on canvas.

All photos Städel Museum – Artothek, Frankfurt am Main, courtesy Städel Museum


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Auction | Studio 54 Exposed

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

Margaret Trudeau, 1980s.
Margaret Trudeau
exposed at Studio 54

Cibachrome print
Estimate $1000 > 2000



Studio 54: Richard Manning
Photos & Modern Art

Palm Beach Modern Auctions
West Palm Beach
Florida | USA

Exhibition until 4 February 2017
Sale 4 February 2017



Karl Lagerfeld,
Paloma Picasso and
guests at Studio 54

Gelatin silver print
Estimate $400 > 800



Posterity demands that that not just every new political or social movement that emerges, but every new genre in art, music and fashion – and even their associated venue – must have its photographer. Sometimes an established professional is commissioned for the job, but often someone just happens to be around to take pictures and, in the process, makes a name for him- or herself off the back of them.

The Nazis chose Leni Riefenstahl to film and photograph their carefully-staged, propagandist 1938 Summer Olympic Games in the specially-built Olympiastadion Berlin, while Jacques Lowe was made John F Kennedy’s presidential campaign photographer in 1960, remaining on hand afterwards to document what went on behind the scenes at The White House during one of the most captivating periods of 20th-century US history. The career of Roxanne Lowit, who began by taking backstage images of Yves Saint Laurent’s runway presentations in 1978 and continued through to the end of his life, became intertwined with the designer’s. From 1978 to 1987, photographer Derek Ridgers hung out in hedonistic London clubs like Le Beat Route, the Blitz, and Taboo, capturing the essence of the scene around the New Romantic movement’s prime movers Boy George, Steve Strange and the band, Spandau Ballet.

Andy Warhol,
Jerry Hall and guests
during the 1980s at Studio 54

Gelatin silver print
Estimate $400 > 800



Debbie Harry
at Studio 54

Gelatin silver print
Estimate $400 > 800



There’s very little information available on the internet about the photographer Richard P Manning (1941 > 2013, aka RPM) who documented the legendary and notorious New York nightclub, Studio 54 – described on Youtube as ‘Sodom and Gomorrah with a disco beat’, a substantial cache of whose work is being sold at auction in Palm Beach this weekend.

Founded 40 years ago in 1977 by Steve Rubell and Ian Schraeger, the club was at its peak from 1977 to 1980. According to Wikipedia, frequent regulars included celebrities such as Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli, Bianca Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Halston, Mick Jagger, Jerry Hall, Debbie Harry, Michael Jackson, Calvin Klein, Elton John, Tina Turner, Divine, Margaret Trudeau, Faye Dunaway, Truman Capote, Margaux Hemingway, Freddie Mercury, Tommy Hilfiger, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Diana Ross, Lou Reed, Al Pacino, Cher, David Bowie, Woody Allen, Iman, Salvador Dalí, Robin Williams, Donald Trump, Diana Vreeland, John Travolta, Lauren Hutton, Karl Lagerfeld, Diane von Fürstenberg, Amanda Lear, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Brooke Shields and Ilie Năstase, among many others. Performers at Studio 54 during its first few years of operation included Grace Jones, Donna Summer, Stevie Wonder, James Brown, Gloria Gaynor, Sylvester and Village People. Manning photographed all of them along with many nameless others, whose behaviour within the confines of the club was often far more outrageous.

Carol Bouquet
n Peter Bear
d, 1979.
Carol Bouquet and
Peter Beard

at Studio 54
Cibachrome print
Estimate $400 > 800



Grace Jones
at Studio 54

Gelatin silver print
Estimate $400 > 800



His candid images were made possible because his subjects specifically extended invitations to him in order to have a record of their wilder revels. Perhaps most famously, he captured Margaret Trudeau, socialite wife of Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, during her separation from her husband, flashing her naked vagina in the club.

Alongside the straight but punchy black and white standard prints he made, Manning also became known for his creative, angular cropping and the artistic effects he produced (with a nod to Any Warhol) by overlaying areas of vibrant colour on some of his images.

A total of 107 Manning prints from the personal collection of Bill & Carol Clements, are included in Palm Beach Modern Auction’s Studio 54: Richard Manning Photos & Modern Art sale.

All images by Richard P Manning, courtesy Palm Beach Modern Auctions, © William Clements / Richard Manning


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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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