Archive for May, 2017

Design | A Tribute to Willy Fleckhaus

Friday, May 19th, 2017

twen, No 2, 1962, cover.
Art direction Willy Fleckhaus
Photography Christa Peters
© MAKK



Willy Fleckhaus.
Design, Revolt, Rainbow
Museum Villa Stuck
Munich | Germany
1 June > 10 September 2017



Frankfurter Allgemeine Magazin,
No 28, 1980, cover.
Art direction Willy Fleckhaus
Photographer unknown
© Hans Döring


Edition Suhrkamp,
Suhrkamp Verlag
Book series, 1963.
Design Willy Fleckhaus
© Carsten Wolff,
Fine German Design,
Frankfurt am Main

xxx



David Hillman: ‘In terms of design, twen was the most admired magazine of the sixties… [Fleckaus’s] utterly uncompromising attitude allowed his outrageous and defiant vision to be translated on to the page… No art director has had such power before or since.’

Willy Fleckhaus was born in 1925, and died in 1983. Willy Fleckhaus. Design, Revolt, Rainbow, at Museum Villa Stuck includes over 350 examples of work spanning his entire career in design, magazines and book publishing.

All images courtesy Museum Villa Stuck


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Exhibition | Drawing as Evidence

Friday, May 12th, 2017

Erik van Lieshout
Untitled, 2014
Charcoal, acrylic
& ink on paper
© Erik van Lieshout.
Courtesy the artist
and Anton Kern
Gallery, New York.
Photo Thomas Müller
and Anton Kern Gallery



Graphic Witness
Drawing Room
London | UK
18 May > 9 July 2017



Andrea Bowers
Fascist Police (Inside
Eastside 1968 no 14,
page 7), 2015
Graphite on paper.
Courtesy the artist and
Kaufmann Repetto,
Milan/New York.
Photo Andrea Rossetti



On 7 January 2015, ten journalists were killed during the attack by three gunmen on the office of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, in Paris. Afterwards, the cartoons published all over the world in tribute to the dead, carried versions of the same message – that the pencil is mightier than the gun.

Beatriz González
Las Delicias 6, 1998
Charcoal on paper.
Courtesy Galeria
Casas Riegner, Bogotá



The forthcoming exhibition at Drawing Room makes the case that pencil drawings, as a medium of witness, can be as effective as photography. ‘To witness’, Kate Macfarlane, co-director of the gallery and the show’s curator, explains, ‘is to have observed, either as a participant, or remotely.’ Whereas a documentary photograph is often an immediate response to a given situation, the graphic response produced by drawing presents the evidence from a different, more measured perspective. ‘When photography is unavailable or inappropriate, drawing can act as witness, and produce subjective commentary on injustice… drawings can prompt a more wide-ranging debate about miscarriages of justice and conflict, and act as tools to prompt social change.’


Joy Gerrard
Protest Crowd,
Chicago, USA,
Trump Rally (2016), 2017
Japanese ink on linen.
© Joy Gerrard.
Courtesy the artist



Mounira Al Solh,
Are you pretending
to be Jesus?
Oil, acrylic, black
ink and charcoal
on canvas.
Courtesy the artist
& Sfeir-Semler Gallery,
Hamburg / Beirut



Graphic Witness at Drawing Room brings together the work of a broad selection of international artists from the 1930s to today, and features new work made especially for the exhibition.

All images courtesy Drawing Room


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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