Archive for March, 2018

Photography | Africa Shines Through

Friday, March 30th, 2018

Zarita Zevallos
Imperium 2, 2017
Archival pigment print



Refraction: New Photography
of Africa and its Diaspora
Steven Kasher Gallery
NYC | USA
19 April 2 June 2018



Keyezua
Fortia (1), 2017
Giclée print on
Hanhemühle paper



Crack it. Smash it. Break it up into little pieces and scatter it. Glass will continue to refract rays of light that pass through it. This show sets out to demonstrate how cultural identity – in this case, African – reacts in a similar way.

Often ripped from their roots and transported many thousands of miles, or forced to flee wars and pogroms, Africans have seen their cultural identity subdued and trampled upon but never entirely transmuted.

Shawn Theodore
All I Ever Wanted Was
A Reason To Be
, 2018

Archival pigment print



Nona Faustine
Over Her Dead Body,
Tweed Courthouse,
Brooklyn, NY
, 2013

Archival pigment print



Stan Squirewell
Afrosaxson, 2017
Mixed media collage



Flying in the face of centuries of adversity, recent decades have seen the emergence of a new generation of photographers of African descent, based in many different locations across the globe, including Africa itself, with a rich diversity of approaches, determined to reclaim and to reassert their cultural heritage.

Eyerusalem Adugna Jirenga
The City of Saints VII, 2017
Digital archival print



Rendered entirely contemporary by its use of modern photography techniques, such as performative self-portraiture, collage, montage and digital manipulation, while their work – captured through fine quality glass camera lenses – makes bold references to traditional African values, rites and rituals, it is nevertheless undoubtedly characterised by the refractive process that African cultural identity has passed through.

Refraction: New Photography of Africa and its Diaspora at Steven Kasher Gallery presents the work of photographers born in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, living in Addis Ababa, Luanda, Paris, New York and beyond.

All images courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Art | Power to the Artists

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018

Adelita Husni-Bey,
The Sleepers, 2012
Oil on canvas
© The artist, courtesy
Galleria Laveronica,
Modica



Power to the People
Political Art Now
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
21 March > 27 May 2018



Phyllida Barlow,
Untitled: 100 banners,
2015, 2015
Lumber, plywood, tape,
wadding, fabric, paint,
sand, and plastic
© The artist, courtesy
Hauser & Wirth,
Photo Stefan Altenburger



This show doesn’t shout; it speaks a powerful, sophisticated language appropriate to our age. As we near the second decade of the 21st century, when democracy is facing critical challenges, contemporary artists are reacting by presenting us with an array of less in-your-face, more thoughtful works than those produced in the genre of political art by previous generations.

Halil Altındere,
Ballerinas and Police, 2017
Full HD Video
© The artist, courtesy
the artist and
Pilot Galeri, Istanbul



Edgar Leciejewski,
A Circle Full of Ecstasy
(detail), 2016
77 colour photographs.
Courtesy the artist



Julius von Bismarck,
Figuration #5 (May Day
Riot Police), 2009
Inkjet print
© The artist, courtesy
Alexander Levy, Berlin;
Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf



Just as supporters of democracy are having to change tack in order to deal effectively with the existential threat they are facing, artists have taken on board the rise of populist leaders, of fake news, of totalitarian propaganda, and of neoliberalism, and have adapted their approach.

Mark Flood,
5000 Likes, 2015 / 16
Spray paint on canvas,
(4,344 parts)
© The artist, courtesy
Peres Projects, Berlin,
Photo Matthias Kolb



Osman Bozkurt,
Marks of Democracy /
Portraits of the Voters, 2002
10 C-prints
Deutsche Bank Collection
© The artist



Ricarda Roggan,
Triptychon (Chair, Table
and Partition), 2001
C-Print (detail)
© The artist, courtesy
Galerie Eigen +
Art Leipzig / Berlin



Neither a single group nor an organised movement, the clutch of international artists whose work is included in Power to the People: Political Art Now at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt nevertheless gel into a single, purposeful force to be reckoned with.

Images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Gardens | Burle Marx: Landscape Architect Speaks Out

Friday, March 9th, 2018

Banco Safra, roof garden,
São Paulo, 1983



Roberto Burle Marx Lectures
Landscape as Art and Urbanism
Edited by Gareth Doherty
Lars Müller Publishers
15 x 20 cm, 288 pages
Paperback with English text
Available now



Parque Burle Marx (formerly Pignatari residence), São Paulo, 1956



Roberto Burle Marx (1909 > 1994), was a visionary Brazilian gardener, artist and botanist, who harboured an ambition to bring radical change to cities and society, rather than just to gardens. Hailing from a well-to-do German / Brazilian family background, however, his insistence on calling himself a landscape architect may have stemmed from his awareness that architects are invited to enter houses by the front door while gardeners are sent around to the back.

Copacabana Beachfront (Avenida Atlântica), Rio de Janeiro, 1970



At heart, Burle Marx was an artist: ‘I am the first to agree that there are no aesthetic differences between the object of painting and the object of constructed landscapes. Only the means of expression differ.’ Until it was pointed out to him by a business partner that the company must respect their client’s wishes, he had never considered compromise.

Carefully-researched and presented by editor Gareth Doherty of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, where he is director of the Master in Landscape Architecture programme, this new book brings together the texts of a dozen of Burle Marx’s lectures, but the insight Doherty provides into the landscape architect’s character, his fascinating life and the development of his work and practice is also enthralling. The glimpses into Burle Marx’s on /off professional relationship with Oscar Niemeyer, principal architect of Brasilia, are particularly revealing.

Centro de Processamento de Dados do Banco do Brasil, São Paulo, 1970



Fazenda Vargem Grande Areis, São Paulo, 1979 > 1991



Although Burle Marx was commissioned to design his first garden in 1932, at the age of 23, and was involved in many major landscaping schemes in the interim, the undulating curves and patterns of the Copacabana beachfront, which he designed in stages between 1970 and 1991 are his best-known creations. He practised almost exclusively in Brazil but earned a global reputation for the breadth of his knowledge of plants and for the ingenuity of his work. Burle Marx is revered by many as the most important landscape architect in the history of the field. He was regularly invited on international speaking tours in the course of which he spoke passionately on topics including Concepts in Landscape Composition, The Garden as a Form of Art and Finding a Garden Style to suit Contemporary Needs.

Petrobas, Rio de Janeiro, 1969



Leonardo Finotti’s beautiful photographs of Burle Marx’s projects are an essential element of this accessible and boldly packaged, compact book. Arranging them into two equal, unbroken blocks, placed, respectively, right at the front and right at the back, sandwiching the text pages between, would have been a good idea had this been a hardback. Despite assurances from the publisher that dispensing with the glue that would usually attach the spine to the book’s cover, thereby exposing the folded edges of the inside sections and the raw threads that hold them together, is a considered design feature, it would seem more likely that during the production process someone realised that in a paperback the picture spreads would never open flat enough to be easily viewed. Unfortunately, the result is a front cover that doesn’t close properly.

Roberto Burle Marx Lectures: Landscape as Art and Urbanism is published by Lars Müller Publishers

All photographs © Leonardo Finotti. Pages supplied by the publisher


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Photography | Polaroid: a Unique Project

Friday, March 2nd, 2018

Buttock, 1983
Şahin Kaygun
Hand coloured,
manipulated Polaroid
Type 600 High Speed
© Şahin Kaygun



The Polaroid Project
Museum für Kunst
und Gewerbe Hamburg
Hamburg | Germany
16 March > 17 June 2018



Charles Jourdan 1978, 1978
Guy Bourdin
C-Print, © The Guy
Bourdin
Estate 2017,
courtesy Louise
Alexander Gallery



Each one is unique and can’t be duplicated. They almost always have an unfinished quality. They look more at home pinned or taped on a wall than framed up, behind glass. Polaroid prints are often cited as the precursors of apps such as Instagram but viewing them on phone and computer screens doesn’t do them any favours.

Pulls (CMY), 1997
Ellen Carey
Polaroid Polacolor-Montage
© Ellen Carey, Jayne
H Baum Gallery, NYC, NY
and M+B Gallery, LA, CA



To its credit, The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology published last year by Thames & Hudson provided well-researched documentation of the medium’s history and showed an array of diverse examples of Polaroid photography. The designers of the more compact Polaroid: The Magic Material (Frances Lincoln, 2016) attempted to format the book to emulate one classic version of the Polaroid print format (8.8 x 10.7 cm) but failed to express the physicality of the prints themselves. While a wide range of photographic prints can be reproduced fairly accurately via high-quality lithography, or better still by using the gravure technique, Polaroids are ideally best seen in the flesh.

August 13, 1979, 1979
André Kertész
Polaroid SX-70
© The Estate
of
André Kertész,
courtesy Stephen
Bulger Gallery



Esther and Bee Jay, 1991
Shelby Lee Adams
Polaroid Polapan Type 52
© Shelby Lee Adams



The Polaroid Project, a travelling exhibition originally shown in summer 2017 at Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth Texas, USA, and then at WestLicht Museum for Photography in Vienna, Austria – it won’t be shown in the UK – provides another opportunity for visitors to do just that at Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg. Some 220 photos by over 100 artists are included in the exhibition, as well as 90 camera models and prototypes.

All images courtesy Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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