Archive for the ‘Culture’ Category

Exhibitions | Victoria & Albert’s Secret

Friday, April 8th, 2016

Contemporary
dominatrix ensemble
from House of Harlot
© Sister Sinister



Undressed:
A Brief History of Underwear

Victoria & Albert Museum
London | UK
16 April 2016 > 12 March 2017



In Serge Nazarieff’s classic book Early Erotic Photography (Taschen, 1993), aside from a little gauzy chiffon, the odd petticoat or gartered stocking tops, all the women shown are totally naked, many in full frontal poses. Reminiscent of anthropological studies, with little left to the imagination, the images  – although they almost certainly did at the time they were taken – paradoxically, emote no particular sexual excitement. As the designs of lingerie company Agent Provocateur, joint-sponsors of the V&A’s forthcoming exhibition along with Revlon, exemplify, underwear contrives to be far more provocative than actual nudity could ever be.

Shorty stretch brief
designed by DaDa



Jean Paul Gaultie
underwear-inspired
dress, 1989



Wearing underwear is generally understood as a mark of civilisation, but far from being developed for practical purposes female underclothing was originally developed as a fashion aid. The crinoline depended on a hidden wooden framework and eighteenth and nineteenth century wasp waists were made possible via the use of a substantial corset. American dance pioneer Isadora Duncan shed her restrictive corset in the 1910s, and while in the following decade Coco Chanel discarded it in favour of comfort and casual elegance in her clothing designs, Karl Lagerfeld would reintroduce the corset for the Chanel Spring 2014 Couture collection. Controversially, in the 1950s, to make it possible for women to wear his New Look, Christian Dior came up with the ‘waspie’, which may have been only five or six inches deep, but was usually worn over an additional, body-shaping panty- or roll-on girdle. Rather than by the mythical bra-burning of American women’s liberationists, the new independent spirit of the 1960s women was encapsulated in Mary Quant’s body stocking.

1950s Y-front point
of sale material



Side hoop petticoat
covered in linen,
retailed by A Schabner,
England, 1778



It has existed for centuries, and entry to its world had become freely available on the internet for anyone with the appetite to search, but the 2011 publication of the erotic novel Fifty Shades of Grey initiated the masses into the ‘kinky’ side of sex, with the result that sales at lingerie and sex toy retailer Ann Summers, according to the industry monitor Draper’s, rocketed by a dramatic 78% year-on-year. However, with around 25% of sales, Marks and Spencer’s somewhat tamer women’s underwear continues to dominate the UK market.

Nylon and lycra
girdle, 1960s



Man’s linen shirt,
Great Britain, 1775 > 1800
and underdrawers,
France, 1775 > 1799



For this show, men’s underwear, too, is coming out of the closet and women, eager to get men out of their practical, supportive, but lumpy Y-fronts and into something softer and more appealingly-streamlined, have played a strong role in popularising current styles. Calvin Klein’s spring 2015 men’s underwear marketing featuring Justin Bieber might have been a clear homage to the brand’s iconic 1992 campaign featuring Marky Mark (Mark Wahlberg), but Kate Moss’s inclusion in the earlier video, wearing identical shorts to Mark, guaranteed the product’s success. In a tribute to Moss’s performance, last year Rihanna, who became a creative director for the brand’s women’s wear posed topless in a pair of men’s Puma undershorts.

Undressed: A Brief History of Underwear at the Victoria & Albert Museum will display more than 200 examples of underwear from custom-made 18th century items to pieces by designers such as John Galliano, Juicy Couture, Stella McCartney, La Perla, Rigby & Peller, Paul Poiret, Schiaparelli, Paul Smith, and Vivienne Westwood.

All images courtesy the V&A
All items © Victoria and Albert Museum, London, unless otherwise stated


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Culture | From Bauhaus to Black Mountain

Friday, February 19th, 2016

Hazel Larsen Archer, Merce Cunningham dancing,
contact sheet, c1952-53
Estate of Hazel Larsen Archer and Black
Mountain College Museum and Arts Center



Leap Before You Look:
Black Mountain College 1933-1957

The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles | California | USA
21 February > 15 May 2016



Josef Albers, Tenayuca, 1943
Oil on fibreboard
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York



Adolph Hitler did modernism a great service. Paradoxically, in trying to stamp out the movement’s philosophies, in particular by systematically harassing the Bauhaus, whose staff eventually decided to close the school rather than compromise with the Third Reich, he guaranteed the international dissemination of modernist teaching.

Some of the key Bauhaus figures passed through London, leaving a legacy of teaching ideas that would be a major influence on institutions such as the Royal College of Art in the postwar period. But sooner or later, the majority of them emigrated to the USA.

When former director Ludwig Mies van der Rohe arrived in Chicago in 1938, where he was appointed head of the architecture school at the Armour Institute of Technology (later, Illinois Institute of Technology/IIT), László Moholy-Nagy had already established the New Bauhaus there the previous year. Walter Gropius, would become a senior professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, while Marcel Breuer taught at Yale. In 1933, the year the Bauhaus had ceased operations, Josef Albers, speaking no English, had also begun teaching at Yale. However, via a recommendation from the Museum of Modern Art, he was soon hired as the first head of Black Mountain College, a new art school in the relative obscurity of Ashville, North Carolina.

Far less well-known internationally than the New Bauhaus – only scant references are made to it via any currently available UK sources – 10 years ago London’s Arnolfini gallery held an exhibition of a limited selection of the school’s works – the Tate website honours it with just 200 words  – by the 1940s, Black Mountain College became the ideal of experimental arts education in America.

Anni Albers and Alexander Reed, Neck Piece, 1940
Aluminium strainer, paper clips, and chain
The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation
© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/
Artists Rights Society New York.
Photo Tim Nighswander/Imaging 4 Art



Buckminster Fuller, Black Mountain College,
1948/1990, Nancy Newhall

Gelatin silver print
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
©1948, Nancy Newhall, ©2014 The Estate
of Beaumont and Nancy Newhall.
Permission to reproduce courtesy of
Scheinbaum and Russek Ltd, Santa Fe, NM



John Cage, Hazel Larsen Archer
Gelatin silver print
Estate of Hazel Larsen Archer and Black
Mountain College Museum and Arts Center



Conceived by the – by all accounts – brilliant scholar John A Rice, BMC was a completely new type of college based on US philosopher John Dewey’s principles of progressive education. Dewey – reputedly the most significant educational thinker of his era in America – believed that human beings learn through a ‘hands on’ approach and that teachers and students must learn together. Bauhaus students and staff had lived and eaten side by side and embraced a modern lifestyle that included the whole person – body, mind and soul. In the 1919 Bauhaus manifesto Walter Gropius had announced that theatre, lectures, poetry, music, and costume parties, were all part of the programme. The parties promoted contact between the college and the public, an idea that Dewey also endorsed.

Josef Albers, despite his language difficulties, would quickly develop a system that successfully combined both Dewey’s and Bauhaus educational principles, and assemble a board of directors that included Albert Einstein. With great aplomb he put together a formidable and diverse faculty made up of, among others, his talented textile-designer wife Anni Albers, Walter Gropius, Jacob Lawrence, Willem de Kooning, R Buckminster Fuller, Ruth Asawa, and Cy Twombly. Famous alumni would include Robert Rauschenberg, who would describe Albers as having influenced him to do ‘exactly the reverse’ of what he had previously been taught, and John Cage, who staged his first ‘happening’ at the school.

Ruth Asawa, Untitled (S 272), c1955
Copper and iron wire
Private Collection. © Estate of Ruth Asawa.
Photo Laurence Cuneo



Albers left in 1949. As a result of a shift in trends that saw students and faculty drawn towards the cities of San Francisco and New York, in 1953, BMC, having endured 10 years longer than the Bauhaus, closed. A powerhouse, modern educational establishment, the college’s revolutionary and influential methods and ideas would fundamentally change the way in which the visual arts were taught across America, and leave behind a lasting legacy.

Presenting a broad selection of paintings, sculpture, textiles and photography, and including over 250 objects by nearly 100 artists, Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957 at The Hammer Museum is the first comprehensive museum exhibition about the school.

All images courtesy The Hammer Museum


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Exhibitions | The State of the Art of the Skatepark

Friday, February 12th, 2016

Magny-les-Hameaux, Île-de-France
Photo Stéphane Ruchaud, 2016


Rue Léon Cladel, Paris
Agence Constructo & Raphaël Zarka, 2012
Photo Stéphane Ruchaud, 2016


Toulouse, Midi-Pyrénées
Photo Maxime Delvaux, 2016


Courbevoie, Paris
Photo Stéphane Ruchaud, 2016


Baumes-les-Dames, Franche-Comté
Photo Cyrilles Weiner, 2016


Bois-le-Roi, Île-de-France
Photo Stéphane Ruchaud, 2016



Landskating
Architecture Exhibition
Villa Noailles
Hyères | France
21 February > 20 March 2016



Oddly contoured, possessed of an eerie, otherworldly atmosphere, had they been around in the early 20th century, Edward Hopper might have been inspired to paint empty skateparks. Perhaps it was an oversight on his part  – maybe the subject wasn’t sophisticated enough to appeal to his taste – that JG Ballard never constructed a dystopian epic with skateboarding culture as its hub.

Rooted in Los Angeles in the 1950s when surfers, looking for something to surf when the ocean waves were too flat, hit on the idea of taking to the streets on strips of plywood with roller skate wheels attached, skateboarding, having developed into a global youth leisure pursuit –  its sister sport, snowboarding was first included in the winter Olympics in Japan, in 1998 – has been recommended for inclusion at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

Early skateboarders called their invention ’sidewalk surfing’, but with lumber purloined from construction sites they also constructed skateboarding ramps in their backyards/gardens. These, together with the curving surfaces of drained swimming pools were the forerunners of today’s skateparks. Skateboarding, therefore, was about the emancipation and creative re-use of existing space, so perhaps the very idea of trying to construct a state-of-the-art skateboard park is a contradiction in terms and British architect Guy Hollaway’s (2015) plans for the world’s first multi-storey arena in Folkstone, based on the premise put forward by the developer that ‘it might stop people leaving because there’s nothing to do there’, probably run contrary to the renegade/make-do/spontaneous ethos of skateboarding aficionados.

One section of the forthcoming exhibition Landskating at Villa Noailles focuses on a photographic commission – from which the images above are extracted – of thirty or so skateparks in France, and another explores the architecture of nine international skateparks. However, the object of the show is to examine the effect of the global proliferation of skateparks on youth culture, urban regeneration and town planning.

All photographs courtesy the Villa Noailles © the photographers


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Books | Flying in the Face of Adversity

Friday, January 8th, 2016


Burkitshi horsemen hunt with eagles in the Altai mountains of western Mongolia



Hunting with Eagles
In the Realm of the Mongolian Kazakhs
Photographs by Palani Mohan
Published by Merrell
Hardcover + jacket
128 pp / 85 duotone illustrations
Available now



The exotically dressed chap with an eagle perched on his gloved hand set in a dramatic, mountainous landscape, on the front cover of this book, might be modelling Alexander McQueen menswear. Only he’s not. The photograph could be an example from an early 20th century anthropological study similar, say, to Martin Gusinde’s formidable work on the tribes of Tierra del Fuego. But it isn’t. It was taken just recently by Indian-born, Hong Kong-based photographer Palani Mohan in the wilderness of the vast and isolated Altai mountains of western Mongolia, close to its borders with China and Russia, and shows a real life, nomadic Kazakh using a golden eagle to hunt his prey, just as his ancestors have done for hundreds of years before him.

Unusual clouds form at high altitudes as the wind rises over the mountains



While the subject matter is lent a heroic, even stylish dimension by the photographs it is, nevertheless, infused with pathos. Ethnic Kazakhs, numbering around 100,00 are Mongolia’s largest minority, but no more than fifty to sixty true eagle-hunters or burkitshi, as they are known locally, are left. ‘I have an important job to do’, Mohan told Orazkhan, one of the oldest and wisest of the men who hunt with eagles, who sipped yak’s milk tea while howling winter winds brought fresh snow to the desolate valley outside, ‘to document the burkitshi before they disappear.’ And over the years he photographed them, Mohan would learn the intimate details of their relationship with the birds that are integral to the existence of these stoic people. How they take female eagles – larger and more powerful than the males – from the nest as pups then treat them as part of the family. How the burkitshi hand-feed the eaglets – as they do their own children – to develop a bond of trust, even love, before training them to hunt their prey: the foxes that provide food for the hunters’ wives and children, whose pelts are made into the warm clothing that is essential for survival in the harsh Altai climate. It is this close family bond that ensures the mature eagles return to present their kill to the hunters. Poignantly, however, after ten to fifteen years, the eagles past their prime, all bonds must be broken and every bird returned – with the reluctance of all parties involved – to the wild.

Golden eagles – like children – are treated as part of the family



Exceptionally well-printed – perhaps appropriately, in nearby China – on premium quality smooth coated paper, Merrell PublishersHunting with Eagles is simply designed in the tradition of the best documentary photography books, with all of the emphasis on Palani Mohan’s extraordinary pictures, which, judging by those on his website, are the most accomplished he has produced to date.

All photographs courtesy Merrell Publishers
© Palani Mohan







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Photography | War & Peace in B/W & Colour

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Robert Capa, West of Namdinh, Indochina (Vietnam), May 1954
International Center of Photography, New York
© Robert Capa / ICP /Magnum Photos



Capa in Color
Jeu de Paume-Château de Tours
Tours | France
21 November 2015 > 29 May 2016

+

Don McCullin ‘War and Peace’
Christie’s Lecture in aid
of
the Tusk Trust
Christie’s London
London | UK
9 December 2015



Robert Capa, Party, Rome, Italy, August 1951
International Center of Photography, New York
© Robert Capa / ICP /Magnum Photos



The gritty and graphic black and white photography that Robert Capa (b Budapest 1913, d Indochina 1954) is famous for – the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, and the First Indochina War – tell the dramatic and poignant story of armed conflict and political strife in uncompromising terms by a fearless photographer who made no bones about being right there amongst the action. To equal effect, Capa applied the same treatment to documenting European cities in the immediate aftermath of WWII. Amongst the many posthumous retrospective exhibitions of his work, however, virtually none of the colour images that he produced on another camera, which he used alongside that loaded with black and white film, have ever appeared in print.

Capa began experimenting in colour as early as 1938, using Kodachrome to document the Sino-Japanese War and was disappointed when only four of his colour pictures (the more hard-hitting of which were not available to accompany this post, but some of which can be seen here) that he regarded as lacking nothing in comparison to his monochrome images, were selected for use in Life magazine. Despite his best efforts, none of his 1941 World War II colour photographs ever reached publication. Capa in Color at the Jeu de Paume’s outpost in the Château de Tours – organised in conjunction with the International Center of Photography (ICP), New York, which showed the exhibition for the first time this summer – provides Europe with the rare opportunity to see this unseen and revealing body of work.

Robert Capa, Woman on the beach, Biarritz, France, August 1951
International Center of Photography, New York
© Robert Capa / ICP /Magnum Photos



Robert Capa — Capucine, French model and actress, on a balcony, Rome, Italy, August 1951
International Center of Photography, New York
© Robert Capa / ICP /Magnum Photos



Well-known for his pursuit of beautiful women, lover of actress Ingrid Bergman, who he met when she was entertaining American soldiers in Europe, in 1945, Capa followed her to Hollywood, where, in an attempt to reinvent himself as a photographer, he worked for American International Pictures for a short time. Suggestive of uncertainty and wandering, the glamorous colour images of his postwar career are devoid of the gravity of his war stories. Having revealed that his great wish was to become an ‘unemployed’ war photographer, but unsure of his role in the more playful and prosperous colourful world that magazines were keen to promulgate, in 1954, Capa accepted a Life magazine assignment in Southeast Asia where French forces had been fighting for eight years. Under fire in a dangerous area, he left his jeep and stepped on a landmine, later dying of his injuries.

Don McCullin (b 1935), who is to present his War and Peace fundraising lecture for the Tusk Trust, in aid of conservation, community development and environmental education programmes across Africa, at Christie’s London in December, has been quoted as saying that he doesn’t like to be termed a war photographer. ‘It’s like saying I work in an abattoir; it’s like being called a criminal,’ he said.

Only a few years after Capa perished, McCullin, having just finished national service in the RAF, took his first published photo of The Guvners, a local Finsbury Park gang posing amongst the remains of a bombed-out house, which appeared in The Observer in 1958. Three years later, having secured a contract with the newspaper, he took his first war photographs for it, covering the Cyprus war. McCullin worked for The Sunday Times Magazine between 1966 and 1984, a period in which he considers he produced his finest work. Most famous for his photos of Vietnam and Cambodia, his Sunday Times assignments took him to Biafra, the Belgian Congo, Northern Ireland, Bangladesh, the Lebanese Civil War, El Salvador, and the Russian invasion of Afghanistan. In a recent interview published on the Christie’s website he explained, ‘I found wars exciting when I first went to photograph them. I thought this is fun, the bullets are flying – it’s a bit Hollywood. Then I started going to wars where the civilian population was suffering the most, and that brought about a change in me.’

Don McCullin, The Guvnors in their Sunday Suits, Finsbury Park, London, 1958
© Don McCullin, courtesy Hamiltons Gallery



Don McCullin, Palestinian Woman returning to ruins of her house, Beirut
© Don McCullin, courtesy Hamiltons Gallery



McCullin took huge risks in order to take his photographs. Threatened with a knife at a Muslim checkpoint in Beirut, blinded by CS gas during a riot in Derry, he was wounded by mortar shell fragments in Cambodia. He was most frightened when, having been arrested by Idi Amin’s thugs in Uganda he was taken to a notorious prison where they were murdering hundreds of people every day with sledgehammers. He survived; but admits to being damaged. His relentless bravery undimmed, his urge to go wherever the action is unassuaged – aged 77, he covered the war in Aleppo, Syria, for The Times – sharing a home with his third wife, he now has a firm base in Somerset, where his friend, David Bailey, is a neighbour.

Although his own work is sought after and sells for thousands of pounds via his gallerist, Hamiltons, McCullin deplores the pretentiousness of photographers who call themselves artists. Having dabbled in colour, he remains a master of black and white photography. Now 80 years old, he turned his attention to landscape in the late 1980s. ‘After all, a landscape cannot cry or bleed,’ he has said. In 2010 he went in search of the Roman ruins spread across the Middle East and North Africa, photographing them for his book, Southern Frontiers: A Journey Across The Roman Empire. His newer images include British landscapes, notably of Somerset. Hauser & Wirth Somerset, in Bruton, is currently hosting the exhibition Don McCullin: Conflict – People – Landscape.

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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Design | Punchy Image / Sensitive Touch

Friday, November 13th, 2015

Karl Gerstner, Auch Du bist liberal /
You’re liberal too
, 1956.
Political poster
© Karl Gerstner / Muriel Gerstner
(represented by Maria Jurkovic)



Handzeichen / Hand Signs
Museum für Gestaltung – Schaudepot
Zürich | Switzerland
27 November 2015 > 28 February 2016

+

Bitte berühren! / Please touch!
Museum für Gestaltung – Schaudepot
Zürich | Switzerland
27 November 2015 > 20 March 2016

+

Poster Collection 27:
Die Hand / The Hand
Edited by the Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Lars Müller Publishers, (2015)
98 pp, 120 illustrations,
paperback



Armin Hofmann,
Stadttheater Basel 63/64, 1963.
Concert poster
Photo Max Mathys
© Armin Hofmann



Kōichi Saitō
Ongakuza / Soap Bubbles Floated,
They Floated into Outer Space, 1989.
Film poster



As powerful, expressive, beautiful, and versatile as they have the potential to be, left to their own devices hands can get a bit restless, drift around, feel a little lost. But give them a purpose – gripping, punching, pointing, caressing, adding weight to an argument – and they instantly come into their own. Three, more or less, simultaneous design events – two exhibitions, the publication of a new book – all related – invite us to take a closer look at hands.

In Michaelangelo’s ubiquitous painting The Creation of Adam (c 1512), God thrusts out his hand, boldly pushing forward a single finger to touch lonely and anxious-looking Adam’s rather limp one. The entire message behind the picture is in the interplay of those two hands – something any good poster designer instinctively understands. Even these Michaelangelo hands, however, would remain impotent as a poster image until set to work with type, plus perhaps a few additional visual props, to communicate whatever the commission demands. Handzeichen / Hand Signs, the Museum für Gestaltung Zürich’s forthcoming exhibition brings together both diverse and similar examples – political, commercial, arts-related, and social – of international poster design, all incorporating the hand, each utilising the hand’s symbolic strength for maximum impact, to present a brief cultural history of how it has been used as a design element to express a wide variety of meaningful messages. Lars Müller PublishersPoster Collection 27: Die Hand /The Hand, the latest in this well-designed, high quality and apparently limitless series, is published to coincide with this exhibition and features examples from the Museum’s vast archive.

Climbing grips
Photo F X Jaggy + U Romito



Konstantin Datz, Braille Cube,
Rubik’s Cube for the Blind, 2010
© Konstantin Datz



Watchmaker’s tools, 1990s
Photo F X Jaggy + U Romito



Designed by nature to assist early man in building a life for himself, used to scrape, smash, gather and kill, sometimes to draw and paint and carve, over a relatively long period human hands became adept at making tools to work with, at building and farming, and later skilled in the art of writing. Up until quite recently, it must be said, in the developed world, hands led an interesting sort of existence. But then along came 21st century technology…

Albeit playing the role of the hand tool that thousands of man-made objects throughout history have before it, the new Apple wireless keyboard – now reduced to about about two-thirds of the length of the older versions – still has actual keys that you can push down to type letters that instantly appear in your on-screen electronic document, but only very a light touch is required from the user. The myriad of touch-screen devices, including smartphones, hole-in-the-wall cash machines, interactive maps, gallery guides that have become an integral part of our daily lives exemplify same reductive story. Here, the ‘key’ your finger reaches for may resemble the 3D analogue version you’re familiar with, but it’s completely flat, devoid of form and texture, reduced to an electronically-generated image behind a shiny glass screen. The featherlight touch of a fingertip tapped gently upon it is enough to transport you anywhere you want to go on your digital journey. And, afterwards, if your phone isn’t already taking up all the space, you can slip your redundant hands back into your pockets. With a variety of real objects from the area of contemporary product design, to really touch, really feel, and to really do things with, Museum für Gestaltung’s Bitte berühren! / Please touch! exhibition, offers a helping hand to hands that are suffering from their ever-diminishing role in our rapidly-changing, technology-dominated society.

All images courtesy Museum für Gestaltung Zürich and Lars Müller Publishers.
All image content from the Museum für Gestaltung Zürich collections


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Culture | Hippie Modernism Comes of Age

Friday, October 23rd, 2015

Haus-Rucker-Co
Environment Transformer / Flyhead Helmet, 1968
Archive Zamp Kelp
Photo © Haus-Rucker-Co, Gerald Zugmann



Hippie Modernism:
The Struggle for Utopia
Walker Art Center
Minneapolis | Minnesota | USA
24 October 2015 > 28 February 2016



Archizoom Associati
Superonda Sofa, 1966
Archive Centro Studi Poltronova
Courtesy Dario Bartolini
(Archizoom Associati)



In the year 1967 – incidentally that in which contemporary artist Olafur Eliasson was born, but more of that later – the total number of American troops serving in Vietnam was increased to 475,000. Peace rallies multiplied as the numbers of anti-war protesters swelled. In the Middle East the Six Day War saw Israel attacking Syria, Egypt and Jordan, resulting in Israel’s occupation of massive areas of land outside their previously-designated borders.

That summer cities throughout America exploded with rioting and looting, Detroit being the worst-effected, where, to restore order 7000 National Guardsmen were drafted in.

In stark contrast, 1967 also played host to the ’summer of love’. For three days in June, 200,000 young Americans gathered at the Monterey International Pop Festival in California where they smoked a lot of dope, danced and were entertained by some of the biggest names in music including Jimi Hendrix, the Who, Janis Joplin, Simon & Garfunkel and the Mamas and the Papas, and where Scott McKenzie would sing the words of his anthem that came to symbolise the era, ‘If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair…’ While it is claimed that the counterculture movement began in the USA before it became established in Europe, the peace symbol, designed and first used in the UK during the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, later became synonymous with opposition to the Vietnam War, and was much in evidence at events such as Monterey. Elsewhere the ‘flower children’, or ‘hippies’, as they became known, stuck flowers in the barrels of guns held by US National Guardsmen in demonstrations against the masculine culture that gave rise to wars and supported racial discrimination.

Was the hippie culture naive and deserving of the scorn that was poured over it over the next few decades? Once dismissed as both a social and aesthetic failure, the counterculture of the period embraced themes and ideas – ecological awareness, audience participation, the resurgent interest in yoga and spirituality, organic foods, local agriculture, marijuana legalisation, climate change, alternative energy, and social protest movements – that persist and are growing in popularity today. Step into one of fashionable contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama’s immersive visions of endless dots and nets or infinitely mirrored space – currently on show at Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art – and you’re sampling experiences that began life in the ‘hippie’ era. Indeed, regarding them as fundamentally important to her life and work, 86-year old Kusama, who talks of seeking a cosmic vision, longs for love and peace.

Corita Kent
yellow submarine, 1967

Silkscreen
Corita Art Center, Immaculate Heart Community, LA
Photo Joshua White



Sheila Levrant de Bretteville
Women in Design: The Next Decade, 1975

Poster, cut blue-line process print
Courtesy Sheila Levrant de Bretteville


The conceptual work of the Viennese group Haus-Rucker-Co, founded in 1967, explored the performative potential of architecture through installations and happenings in which, using pneumatic structures or prosthetic devices that altered perceptions of space, viewers became participants with the possibility of influencing their own environments. The radical ideas promoted by seminal British group Archigram include Walking City, a peripatetic giant reptilian structure, Living Pod a miniature capsule home and Instant City, an airship containing all the cultural and education resources of a metropolis which could land in remote areas giving inhabitants a taste of city life, ideas that were not lost on Richard Rodgers and Renzo Piano when they came to design the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, and later on Future Systems, founded by experimental non-conformist architect Jan Kaplický, said by fellow Czech and also British-based Eva Jiřičná to be ‘considered one of the visionaries of modern architecture’.

As radical as they come, Ant Farm, though rooted in architecture, was devoted to cultural critique in different forms, especially video with Cadillac Ranch Show (1974), Media Burn and The Eternal Frame (both 1975) ranking among the most poignant early examples of the genre: the collective is infamous for having briefly ‘kidnapped’ their hero Buckminster Fuller, whose ideas and work continue to influence new generations of designers, architects, scientists and artists working to create a sustainable planet.

Fuller’s former protégé, Icelander Einar Thorsteinn (1942 > 2015), sometimes referred to as architecture’s mad scientist, worked with Frei Otto from 1969-1972 helping to design the futuristic Munich Olympiapark for the 1972 Summer Olympics and later designed mobile lunar research laboratories for NASA. In 1996, he would team up with Danish-Icelandic Olafur Eliasson, 25 years his junior, and become the mad scientist collaborator behind some of Eliasson’s more renegade works. It would be Eliasson, who would pick up the torch of countercultural experimentation and carry it into the third millennium, in so doing making himself into one of the most successful artists of our era. In 2003 he installed The weather project at the London’s Tate Modern, converting the massive open space of the gallery’s Turbine Hall into an awe-inspiring sun-worshipper’s paradise. His design for the annual London’s Serpentine Pavilion in 2007 was produced in collaboration with Kjetil Thorsen of Oslo and New York’s Snøhetta architectural practice. The timber-clad structure, resembling a spinning top, acted as a ‘laboratory’ where, every Friday night, artists, architects, academics and scientists lead a series of public experiments. The programme culminated in an extraordinary, two-part, 48-hour marathon event exploring the architecture of the senses. In November 2013, at the Falling Walls Conference in Berlin, Olafur presented with Ai Weiwei, connected via an internet link from Beijing, their collaboration Moon, an open digital platform that allows users to draw on an enormous replica of the moon via their web browser, is a statement in support of freedom of speech and creative collaboration. For Contact, which ran from December 2014 to February 2015 at Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, and reflected Olafur’s on-going investigations into the mechanisms of perception and the construction of space, artworks appeared as a sequence of events along a journey. Moving through passageways and expansive installations, visitors become part of choreography of darkness, light, geometry, and reflections. Rooted in the late 1960s and 1970s, Eliasson’s ideas lead us on into the future.

Neville D’Almeida and Hélio Oiticica
CC5 Hendrixwar / Cosmococa Programa-in-Progress, 1973

Coloured hammocks, 35mm slideshow, audio disc
Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
T B Walker Acquisition Fund, 2007



Explorations into domestic living during and after the hippie period led to innovative designs such as Ken Isaac’s Superchair – a frame structured structure with inbuilt shelving, suitable for books, and supporting a platform that doubles as an easy chair or bed. In 1973, Switzerland’s Ubald Klug combined diverse elements into ‘lounge landscapes’, comparable to layered topographical models, on which Mick Jagger posed for an advertising shot illustrating the extent to which the concept captured the contemporary zeitgeist. Also in Switzerland, Danish architect and designer Verner Panton, who idiosyncratically fused pop art with design, created a domestic utopia in his own home, which he used as a showroom and laboratory for his experiments. Echoes of this pioneering spirit could be seen at London’s V&A Museum in 20111, when French designers Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec laid a striped field of fabric loungers inside the Raphael Court as part of the London Design Festival. The Textile Field installation covered 240 square metres of the gallery floor and encouraged gallery visitors to sit or even lie down, to contemplate the renaissance artworks exhibited rather than merely to view them.

Works on show in a new exhibition at the Walker in Minneapolis include Ken Isaac’s pioneering The Knowledge Box (1962 > 2009), a room-size chamber where one is immersed in a montage of projected images culled from the popular press. According to the Time Life website ‘built in 1962, [it] predated the internet by three decades — but also hinted at information-gathering techniques that we all use today, everyday, online.’ An integral part of the Black Panther Party, Emory Douglas designed potent, hard-hitting artwork for newspaper illustrations, posters and pamphlets that became symbolic of the movement and which inspired many to act are also included. Meanwhile, work by Corita Kent, aka Sister Mary Corita, who gained international fame for her vibrant typographic silk screen prints during the 1960s and 1970s, who was a sister of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, running the Art Department at a convent until 1968 when she left the order to pursue her commitment to social justice and hope for peace, is featured.

Loosely assembled around the American psychologist, writer and advocate for psychedelic drugs, Timothy Leary’s famous mantra, ‘Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out’, Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia, at The Walker Art Museum in Minneapolis examines the intersections of art, architecture, and design of the era.

All images courtesy The Walker Art Museum


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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All Categories | Here, There + Everywhere

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

Piet Mondrian (1872 – 1944),
Komposition in Oval mit Farbflächen 2, 1914

© Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Netherlands.
On show at Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, see below



The Blog’s regular posts won’t appear on
Friday 11 and Friday 18 September.

We’ll be back on Friday 25 September.
Until then, here are a few events around
the globe you might like to know about



London | UK
Don McCullin: Eighty
Hamiliton’s Gallery
9 September > 3 October
Exhibition honouring McCullin’s 80th birthday: each print in the exhibition is in an oversized format – the scale enhancing their monumentality and power.

The London Art Book Fair
Whitechapel Gallery
10 > 13 September 2015
Highlights include Michael Craig-Martin in discussion with his former student Fiona Rae.


Berlin | Germany
Piet Mondrian. The Line
Martin-Gropius-Bau
4 September > 6 December 2015
Exhibition illustrating the development of Mondrian’s work from before lines and the organisation of image areas dominated his abstract creations.

Sol Lewitt – Wall Drawings, Grids on Black and White
Konrad Fischer Galerie
3 September > 31 October

+

Düsseldorf | Germany
Sol Lewitt – Wall Drawings, Grids on Color
Konrad Fischer Galerie
4 September > 31 October
Two solo exhibitions of LeWitt’s wall drawings running almost concurrently at both the gallery’s venues.


New York City | USA
Mike Kelley
Hauser & Wirth
10 September 10 > 24 October 2015
Exhibition on the late Los Angeles artist who reworked the imagery and mythology of the popular American comic book hero, Superman.

Gego: Autobiography of a Line
Dominique Lévy
10 September 10 > 24 October 2015
Exhibition of German-born Venezuelan artist Gego (Gertrude Goldschmidt, 1912 > 1994), in whose intricate wire sculpture, line becomes a dimensional language with which to describe architectural space and engage the human body.


Paris | France
Toshio Shibata: Night Photographs
Polka Gallery
12 September > 31 October 2015
Japanese photographer of the postwar generation is particularly known for his monumental infrastructure photographs. The Night Photographs, taken exclusively at night in the 80s, but only now put on to the public display are black and white pictures when his current work is in colour.


Hong Kong | China
Nam June Paik – The Late Style
Gagosian Gallery
17 September > 7 November 2015
Video sculptures, paintings, and drawings produced during the last decade of Paik’s life, many of which have never been exhibited, will be presented together with key works from the 1960s through the 1980s.


Milan | Italy
Atlante del gesto
Fondazione Prada
18 September > 3 October 2015
A series of choreographic actions conceived by Virgilio Sieni for Fondazione Prada’s new Milan venue.


Lausanne | Switzerland
The memory of images:
The iconographic collection of the Canton de Vaud
Musée de l’Elysée
18 September 2015 > 3 January 2016
Founded in 1896 by the pastor Paul-Louis Vionnet (1830-1914), the collection contains hundreds of thousands of images covering the history of the medium. This presentation chronicles the beginnings of documentary photography applied to the inventory of local heritage and the history of the Canton of Vaud.


Amsterdam | The Netherlands
ZeroNow: on the Topicality of Zero
Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
24 September > 25 September 2015
A symposium about Zero one of the mid-20th century’s most interesting and influential art groups, with Rem Koolhaas (OMA, Rotterdam), among other prominent international speakers.


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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Home | Not Living Alone

Thursday, September 3rd, 2015

Villa van Vijven, Almere,
The Netherlands, 2008,
by NEXT architects
Photo Iwan Baan



Daheim – Bauen und Wohnen in Gemeinschaft /
At Home – Building and Living in Communities
DAM Deutsches Architekturmuseum
Frankfurt am Main | Germany
12 September > 28 February 2016



BIGYard, Berlin, Germany, 2010,
by Zanderroth Architekten
+ Herrburg Landschaftsarchitekten
Photo Michael Feser



For those who are middle-aged and beyond, the new buildings of the world’s 21st century cities closely resemble, and may even exceed, the promise of those portrayed in the futuristic drawings in the science fiction comics of our youth. New housing, however, in many suburban areas of the UK and in towns and villages, more stylistically homogenous than ever before, while aspiring to deliver a reassuring message to the masses that nothing in the lifestyle and tastes of the average Brit has changed, misrepresent reality. Due, not least, to the reconfiguration of our lives as a result of technological advancement, climate change and the need to conserve natural resources, global living patterns are slowly but surely altering.

Since 1980, when Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative government passed legislation making implementation of their Right to Buy policy possible – for the first time, allowing council house tenants to purchase their previously rented homes – Englishmen and English women have commonly believed it is their right to own the property in which they live, and very often these are houses, as opposed to apartments.

Studio building,
Yokohama, Japan, 2009,
by
ondesign & partner
Photo Koichi Torimura

The Roof Top, Vienna, Austria,
2012, by
PPAG architects GmbH
Photo Roland Krauss



In 2004, the last time the international Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s figures were updated, Spain at 83% had the largest number of owner-occupiers in the world, with Ireland at 81% coming in a close second. The UK was 6th on the list following Mexico, Greece and Belgium. Australia, the USA and Canada all scored fairly high. At the other end of the scale, Germany, at only 41% ranked among the lowest in the developed world for homeownership, with only the Swiss buying less. Germans, it would seem, aren’t interested in buying a home, and prefer to rent. There are specific reasons why this should be so – suffice to say that, in fairly quick succession, during the first half of the 20th century, the country went through two ruinous wars, in which hundreds of thousands, if not millions of homes were obliterated, later to be replaced by privately-owned apartment buildings, and that the government does not offer any tax cuts to homebuyers. According to the OECD, more than 93% of German respondents said they were satisfied with their current housing situation, which for the vast majority means apartment living in rented accommodation.

Nevertheless, there is evidence that the trend is beginning to change in Germany, across the rest of Europe, and elsewhere in the world, toward resident-owned community living in purpose-built, or reconditioned property.

Meanwhile, in the UK, house prices have risen so steeply that young people can no longer afford to buy them, so they rent. But, because the demand for rental properties far outstrips their availability, rents have risen to unprecedented levels, forcing many to search for alternative ways to live. In the past, community living here was seen as something quirky, for those wishing to lead an ‘alternative’ lifestyle, and we have a talent for sneering at our compatriots who choose to depart from the norm. Housing projects like Bowden House Community, near Torquay in Devon, earnestly describing themselves as, ‘A group of families and individuals aspiring to compassionate and eco-mindful living’ were previously dismissed as ‘hippies’. The UK co-housing Network, however, is growing steadily and now lists over fifty such projects, including Coflats Stroud, which, ‘partly inspired by the 1930’s Isokon Building in Hampstead’, albeit sounding rather retro, is at least more in tune with contemporary tastes.

Spreefeld, Berlin, 2014,
by
ArGE Carpaneto + FAT Köhl
+ BAR Architekten + The co-workers

Photo Ute Zscharnt

Hillside Housing Complex,
Kaltern, Italy, 2010,
by
feld72 Architekten
Photo Hertha Hurnaus



To discover what forms of the cooperative housing phenomenon are taking shape, and what role architecture is playing in this context, At Home – Building and Living in Communities, opening next week at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum in Frankfurt, examines 26 case studies, taking in co-op and housing association building projects in countries such as Germany, Spain, Austria, Italy and even Japan.

The different concepts for the diverse projects included can be seen as responses to the needs of those who live and work in diverse locations. Through their involvement and contributions made during the genesis of each project, innovative, custom-made solutions are developed that are geared directly to the owner / residents’ requirements and desires. The idea of living in individual apartments, and often under one roof, nurturing neighbourly relations and friendship, as well as sharing space and social responsibility, reflects living concepts that are capable of combining traditional as well as modern living models.

All images courtesy Deutsches Architekturmuseum, © the photographers


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The Blogs publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Exhibitions | Reminder: Don’t Miss These…

Saturday, August 1st, 2015

McDermott & McGough, Those Moments, 1955, 2010
Tricolour carbon print. Courtesy the artists and Cheim & Read, New York.
On show at The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, see below



The Blog team return next week.
Whether you’re staying at home or travelling,
here’s our selection of some of the best
of what’s on show this summer >>>



Doug Aitken, Sunset (black and white), 2011
Hand carved foam, epoxy with LED lights and hand silk-screened acrylic.
Courtesy the artist, 303 Gallery, New York, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich, Victoria Miro Gallery, London and Regen Projects, LA. Photo © Brian Forrest.
On show at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, see below



>>> Until 23 August 2015
Coop Himmelb(l)au
Frankfurt Lyon Dalian

DeutschesArchitekturmuseum (DAM)
Frankfurt | Germany
Vienna-based architectural practice with the long-winded name Coop Himme(l)blau Wolf D Prix & Partner, long-time player on the international architecture scene, founded in 1968 in response to the predominance of rectilinear grids, set out to liberate architecture from its functional confines by rendering space more dynamic and buildings gravity-defying. The exhibition presents three of the studio’s latest projects: the new European Central Bank building (2015) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the Musée des Confluences (2014) in Lyon, France, and the Dalian International Conference Centre in China (2012), see image below.

>>> Auction 28 Aug 2015
Japanese Whisky
Christie’s
Admiralty | Hong Kong
Featuring Hanyu Ichito’s Full Cards Series of 54 bottles of the spirit, each with beautifully-designed individual labels on a playing card theme, which are expected to sell for HK$1.8 m > 2.4 m / £150,000 > 200,000 / US$230,000 > 310,000.

>>> Until 28 August 2015
Joana Vasconcelos:
Material World

Phillips
(Selling exhibition)
London | UK

Forty works representing various periods of sculptor and installation artist Joana Vasconcelos’s career to date, coinciding with the publication of her monograph by Thames & Hudson.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Perfect Likeness:
Photography and Composition

The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles | USA

Having reached a point when everyone thinks he / she is a photographer, and where photography of every possible style and quality pervades every corner of our daily lives, this exhibition looks at the carefully composed images of fine art photographers such as Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, McDermott & McGough and Jeff Wall.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Design Derby:
The Netherlands – Belgium (1815 > 2015)

Museum Boijmans
Van Beuningen

Rotterdam | Netherlands

Like for like Dutch and Belgium design objects – from sumptuous and elegant Belgian art nouveau to the more austere Dutch version, and from the contemporary tours de force of Belgium design to the level-headed Dutch design of today – confront one other in friendly competition.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Fast Fashion
The Shadowy Side of Fashion

Museum für Kunst und
Gewerbe Hamburg

Hamburg | Germany
A critical glimpse behind the scenes of fashion – consumerism, economic interests and ecological issues – throwing light upon fashion and its victims; poverty and affluence; global and local effects; wages and profits; garments and chemicals; clothes and ecology; as well as new fibre technologies.

>>> Until 26 September 2015
Larry Bell 2D-3D:
Glass & Vapor

White Cube, Mason’s Yard
London | UK
Larry Bell (b 1939, Chicago) is a leading exponent of the California ‘Light and Space’ movement. The exhibition includes three early glass installations as well as collages on paper and new, kinetic Light Knot sculptures. To coincide with a major presentation of a Standing Wall installation of thirty-two, six foot square glass panels (c1989 >2014) currently on show at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, USA, at White Cube, Bell has installed 6 x 8 An Improvisation.

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Doug Aitken
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
Following on from his Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening extravaganza at London’s Barbican, The Shirn dedicates its entire exhibition space, inside and out, to the impressive work of American multimedia-artist Doug Aitken, in the most comprehensive solo presentation of his film, music, architecture, performance and sculpture in Germany and elsewhere to date, see image above

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Germaine Krull
A Photographer’s Journey

Jeu de Paume
Paris | France
The idea of the female career photographer – rather than dabbler or dilettante – didn’t properly materialise until free-spirited women such as Gertrude Krull (1897 > 1985) thrust herself headlong into the male-dominated mêlée in the 1920s.



One-sheet poster for Sullivan’s Travels, directed by Preston Sturges, 1941
Poster art direction by Maurice Kallis. Courtesy Sikelia Productions.
On show at MoMA in New York, see below

Dalian International Conference Centre, China, by
Coop Himmelb(l)au Wolf D Prix & Partner, in Vienna, Austria

Photo © Duccio Malagamba.
On show at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt, see above



>>> Until 27 September 2015
What is Luxury?
V&A
London | UK
The world’s biggest museum of the decorative arts and design has a permanent, historic collection of over 4.5 million objects. By definition it is a museum of things, many of which are extremely valuable and considered to be luxurious items. With over 100 objects, ‘From a diamond made from roadkill to a vending machine stocked with DNA, a golden crown for ecclesiastical use to traditional military tailoring, this exhibition addresses how luxury is made and understood in a physical, conceptual and cultural capacity.’

>>> Until September 30
Scorsese Collects [film posters]
Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
In celebration of director Martin Scorsese’s enduring commitment to the preservation of international film culture, MoMA presents 34 works from his collection, centred around a rare, billboard-size poster for the 1951 film Tales of Hoffmann. The exhibition will be accompanied by the film series Scorsese Screens throughout August.

>>> Until 4 October 2015
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires:
Grete Stern & Horacio Coppola

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
The first major exhibition of the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who, in the 1930s, established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic.

>>> Until 18 October 2015
The 80s. Figurative
Painting in West Germany

Städel Museum
Frankfurt | Germany
Shedding light on the new and dynamic figurative painting that developed in the 1980s almost simultaneously in Berlin, Hamburg and the Rhineland. Works by among many other artists, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, and Salomé.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture
for a Modern World

Tate Britain
London | UK
Retrospective of one of Britain’s greatest artists, Barbara Hepworth (1903 > 1975), one of the few women artists to achieve widespread recognition and international prominence, featuring many of her most significant sculptures in wood, stone and bronze alongside her rarely seen works that exemplified modernism from the 1920s onwards.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Gilbert & George:
The Early Years

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
‘It’s not a collaboration. . . We are two people, but one artist,’ say the inseparable British artists, Gilbert and George, who have been creating art together for almost fifty years. This exhibition focuses on their early years, from 1969 to 1975, when the art world around them was largely engaged in pop, minimal, and conceptual work, while the pair developed a wholly unique vision.

>>> Until 26 October 2015
Radikal Moderne Planen
und Bauen im Berlin
der Sechziger Jahre

/ Planning and Building
in Berlin in the 1960s

Berlinische Galerie
Berlin | Germany
Via 300 known works and recently rediscovered material representing 30 architects, planners, photographers and artists, this is the first detailed examination of a decade in architecture and urban planning that shaped a city divided not only by a wall, but also by political ideologies.

>>> Until 31 October 2015
Stone Fenoyl (1945 > 1987).
An Imaginary Geography.
A Documentary Record

Château de Tours
(in association with Jeu de Paume)
Tours | France

Famous for his ability to discover and nurture new photographers, and for his admiration of anonymous 19th century photographs, iconographer, curator, art buyer, gallery and Vu agency (now Viva) founder, Pierre de Fenoyl was the first director of France’s National Foundation Photography in 1976. Champion of the work of Brassai, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Duane Michals and André Kertész, alongside prints, documents, films and publications, this retrospective also shows the black and white landscape photography he created himself from 1984.

>>> Until 1 November 2015
Fotografia Futurista
Galleria Carla Sozzani
Milan | Italy
With over one hundred original photographs, representing the work of over thirty photographers, this exhibition demonstrates how, over a fifty-year period, the futurists took possession of the photographic language and used it as a medium to capture the pulse of early 20th century life. In so doing, they transformed photography into the dynamic, potent and multifaceted force it became in both art and commerce in the twentieth century.

>>> Until 31 January 2016
Shoes: Pleasure and Pain
V&A
London | UK
Exploring the euphoria and obsession they can inspire, more than 200 pairs of historic and contemporary shoes from the V&A’s unrivalled international collection, worn by or associated with high profile figures including Marilyn Monroe, Queen Victoria, Sarah Jessica Parker and the Hon Daphne Guinness are on display. Famous shoes, such as the ballet slippers designed for Moira Shearer in the 1948 film The Red Shoes, are exhibited alongside footwear by 70 named designers including Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Jimmy Choo and Miuccia Prada.



Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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