Archive for the ‘Gardens’ Category

Photography | Christmas Trees

Friday, December 4th, 2015

Monkey puzzle /
Araucaria araucana



Christmas Trees
Carlisle Park | Morpeth | Northumberland | UK
Photographed by Pedro Silmon



European beech /
Fagus sylvatica
Common lime /
Tilia x europaea



Sycamore /
Acer pseudoplatanus



European larch /
Larix decidua



European beech /
Fagus sylvatica



Horse chestnut /
Aesculus hippocastanum



All photographs © Pedro Silmon


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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Books | Go Dutch. Lendeert Blok + Marie-José Jongerius

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

Narcissus ‘Polar Ice’, ‘St Agnes’, ‘Mount Hood’, ‘La Riante’, and ‘President Lebrun’



Lendeert Blok.
Les Extravagantes
Éditions Xavier Barral
Photographs Lendeert Blok
Text (in French) Gilles Clément
Cloth-bound hardcover
176 pp, 85 colour and
b/w photographs

+

Marie-José Jongerius
– Edges of the Experiment
Published by Fw:Books
Designed and edited
by Hans Gremmen
Texts (in English) by various
authors, including Jongerius
2 x softcover volumes in slipcase
340 pp



Remarkable plant photographer Karl Blossfeldt (1865-1932), who would have been 27 years in old in 1892 when the first practical and commercially available colour process became available, and would live for another 40, evidently never used colour. Thirty years his junior, the Dutch plant photographer, Lendeert Blok (1895-1986), who took inspiration from Blossfeldt, but was passionate about photographic innovation, would, eventually become famous for his pioneering use of colour.

Blok had studied journalism in South Africa before returning to Lisse, near Amsterdam, and establishing his Photo Technischbureau company, for which he procured work from nearby horticulturalists, producing their display catalogues while experimenting with panoramic formats and colour photography. From 1925, when the use of colour photography remained relatively rare, he began using the autochrome technique, which involved making composite colour images from three colour separations – blue, red and green – on glass plates with potato starches. The resulting images were unique, and could not be duplicated.

Tulipa ‘Fantasy’



Iris ‘Ismene’



Whereas Blossfeldt celebrated the wonder of plants as nature created them, the pioneering Blok was drawn toward horticultural invention and manipulation. And, just as softness and radiance were anathema to the former’s painstakingly detailed and ultimately static, scientific approach, Blok’s images – shot, like Blossfeldt’s, in the studio against plain backgrounds – are strongly redolent of the outdoors. Remaining true to the original flowers, they suggest movement, shifting light and painterly romance, values that harp back to the 19th century aesthetic.

Gilles Clément, who wrote the text for Lendeert Blok: Les Extravagantes, is a French landscape designer, botanist and ecological theorist. He created the André-Citroën Park in Paris (1999), and designed the vast public gardens at the Musée du Quai Branly (2006) in Paris in collaboration with architect, Jean Nouvel.

As the publishers were unable to send The Blog a review copy, we are unable to comment on its design or printing quality.




In stark contrast to Les Extravagantes, Marie-José Jongerius – Edges of the Experiment is, at first sight, a bleak, two-book, boxed set about a bleak subject – America’s ruination of its western landscape, via its unquenchable thirst for water and development in areas where it is naturally scarce. However, somewhat contradictorily, the matter-of-fact images, the non-precious layout treatment and spare packaging contrive to deliver a washed-out, grungy kind of beauty.

Eschewing luxury, the books and slipcase are in various grades of recycled paper or board, while foil-blocking is used as an ironic gesture on both covers.

The opening spread of
volume 1: an arid smog-ridden
shot of Los Angeles,
photographed in 2007 by
Marie-José Jongerius

Hans Gremmen’s Cactus
Desert Scenes: Playmobil
Western, cactus from
the 5251 set
(2 variations)



The project’s editor and ‘curator’, Hans Gremmen, who received a Gold Medal in the Dutch Design Awards for his work on the book Cette Montagne C’est Moi (2012), was also responsible for the design of the complete package. Its feel – the way it is assembled, the layout and typography – has the mainland Northern European design aesthetic, literally, written all over it. More mood-board than structured non-fiction publication, this is collaborative collage, or printmaking in book form. It’s a publishing project, but also an art event and a design project, in which photography, design, journalism, history, and ecological protest, all form a part, and to which 17 international writers and artists, a curator, two architects, a translator, two photographers and an editor/designer have contributed.

Spread within a section
by Taco Hidde Bakker
and Felix van de Vorst,
illustrated with a Krazy Kat
comic strip, stills from
John Ford’s Cheyenne
Autumn
, 1964, and classic
1950s desert scene
photographs by Josef Muench

One of a series of
diagrammatic spreads by
Hans Gremmen, this one
illustrating lakes and
surface water in California



Photographer and researcher, Marie-José Jongerius, is based in Amsterdam. In her studiously calm, simple documentary landscape pictures, over 60 of which, produced over a 10 year period, appear in volume one of Edges of the Experiment, she ‘looks for boundaries, limits and edges between nature and the man-made world.’ Volume two is a collection of essays about the making of the American landscape, illustrated with a wide variety of diverse imagery that includes simple, and beautifully-drawn food production and surface water diagrams, stills from Roman Polanski’s film Chinatown (1974) and westerns, Playmobil cactus scenes, maps, ariel survey photographs, and a portrait of musician Captain Beefheart, among many others.

Lendeert Blok: Les
Extravagantes
images
courtesy Éditions
Xavier Barral,
© Leendert
Blok / Stichting
Spaarnestad Photo

Marie-José Jongerius
– Edges of the Experiment

images,
courtesy Fw:Books



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Art | Beatriz Milhazes takes Rio to Hong Kong

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Turkish garden, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



Beatriz Milhazes
White Cube Hong Kong
Hong Kong
People’s Republic of China
13 March > 30 May 2015



Beatriz Milhazes
Photo Christian Gaul



Beatriz Milhazes’ studio, where she has worked since 1987, is adjacent to Rio de Janeiro’s botanical gardens, and for this latest series of mixed media works, the artist has allowed the exuberant jungle foliage to creep inside, to spread over and mingle with her collection of collaging materials, carrying choice finds along with it to decorate – with her helping hand – the surfaces of the cardboard sheets she uses as her baseboard, thereby producing a group of multi-layered, remarkably vibrant works – a unique abstracted celebration of 21st century Brazil’s tropical splendour and the natural world – opulent compositions which blend mix all manner of influences, most noticeably in this instance from Matisse – in cut-out mode – whose presence extends across much of the show, and is perhaps most apparent in the combination of colours and cut-out shapes in O passeio, (The ride, or The tour).

Yellow sunshine, 2014
Mixed media – Collage of various papers
and acrylic paint on cardboard



Referencing the collage technique invented by the early 20th century cubists, Turkish garden, includes chocolate wafer biscuit wrappers, cut into leaf shapes, as well as rose-patterned, holographic, spotted and striped wrapping papers. The central, river-like horizontal axis of Yellow sunshine gives more than a nod to Sonia Delauney, and in Jardim Kadiwéu (Garden of the Kadiwéu) Milhazes pays homage to local and world-famous painter, printmaker, ecologist, naturalist, artist, musician and landscape architect, Roberto Burle Marx – designer of the undulating op art Copacabana promenade mosaic (completed 1970). Elsewhere, Emilio Pucci patterns reflecting 1960s and 70s glamour overlay radiant colours and textures suggestive of the wild exuberance of the Rio carnival.

Jardim Kadiwéu, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



O Passeio, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



Beatriz Milhazes (b 1960 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) has had numerous international solo exhibitions, including those at Pérez Art Museum / Miami /USA (2014 > 2015), Museu Oscar Niemeyer / Curbita / Brazil (2013), Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation / Lisbon / Portugal (2011), Fondation Cartier/ Paris / France (2009). In 2003, she represented Brazil at the Venice Biennale. As well as the forms and patterns of flowers and leaf shapes that find their way into her painting and mixed media oeuvre, Milhazes has incorporated the rich atmosphere of Rio via its cheap, colourful fabrics and jewellery, its embroidery and folk art, and references to its rich and multi-facetted urban architectural mix.

Mysterious and dream-like, there is no real centre to one of her works. For Milhazes, composition is never static. She wants the viewer’s eyes to move continually across her creations, ‘…That way’, she says, ‘I feel like you have communication with the entire world.’ And, perhaps, in these works in her eponymous show Beatriz Milhazes at White Cube Hong Kong, her intention is to do just that. Beneath the obvious ostentation, there would seem to lurk a far less frivolous intention. Through what might appear as her blithe inclusion of elements such as the mass-produced and ubiquitously discarded, biscuit wrappers, her purpose may be to draw attention, however subliminally, to the threat posed by man to his environment, in which much of the rarer flora is in danger of disappearing from the natural world, and is destined to survive only in our botanical gardens. Poignantly, the remaining 1,400 Kadiwéureferred to above in the title of the work Jardim Kadiwéu – are the last surviving group of Mbayá, a once large and powerful tribe that controlled large parts of Brazil and are now confined to life on a reservation.

All works © Beatriz Milhazes
All images Courtesy White Cube
All works photographed by Motivo,
except Yellow sunshine,
photographed by Pepe Schettino



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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All Categories | Storms, Smoke & Power Cuts

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

Apologies!
Due to a combination of wild storms that blew smoke from the wood fire back down the chimney, setting off  alarms in every room, and covered everything in a fine layer of soot, and the power cut that, in amongst all of this, plunged our friends’ isolated, converted corn mill where we were staying into deep, velvety darkness, The Blog isn’t posting this week.

In the meantime, you might like to take a look at our reminder of the diverse range of international visual arts and events-related subjects we posted in 2014.

Best wishes for 2015



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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All Categories | Omnipresence 2014 / 2015

Friday, December 26th, 2014

2014 proved to be an exciting year at The Blog.

We published posts relating to exhibitions as diverse as Egon Schiele; The Radical Nude at London’s Courtauld Gallery, and Robert Heinecken: Object Matter at MoMA in New York, to another about VKhUTEMAS – often called the Russian Bauhaus – at Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Bau museum. We admired rare and exotic posters in The Art of Travel, exhibited at Cannes during the annual film festival and auctioned afterwards by Christie’s.

We showed a selection of compelling images from Roxanne Lowit Photographs Yves Saint Laurent, a glitzy new book – with an introduction by no less a figure than Pierre Bergé – and wrote about Vitra’s more modest new publication Everything is Connected, which relies totally on visual language rather than written text to relate the company’s labyrinthine story.

We loved Korean artist Lee Bul’s captivating installations at the UK’s Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, and the Museum für Gestaltung’s 100 Years of Swiss Design exhibition – as well as the accompanying Lars Müller book – showing selections from the Museum’s consolidated collections, now housed at the Schaudepot in Zürich’s burgeoning New Toni development.

We covered the Saul Steinberg 100th Anniversary Exhibition at Pace MacGill in New York, and we assembled our own photographic tribute to The Years of ‘La Dolce Vita’, from the paparazzi images on show at the Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, in London.

We published extracts from Christie’s International Head of 20th Century Decorative Art & Design Philippe Garner’s scintillating interview with Zeev Aram, on the subject of Japanese furniture designer Shiro Kuramata. And we salivated over Serge Mouille’s 1950s sculptural lighting included in Phillips Design sale in New York.

We hope the journey so far has been as interesting for you as it has for us.

As the globe – at least in communication terms – continues to shrink, the cultural landscape forever widens and diversifies. What was formerly remote has often become more easily accessible. In response, 2015 will see The Blog extending its reach and venturing into geographical and subject areas we may have so far ignored, exploring and gaining entry for our followers to a broader range of thought-provoking, disparate and topical events in the omnipresent visual arts and associated artistic disciplines.



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Books | Horst, Photographer of Nature

Friday, October 31st, 2014

Photographic pattern, (unidentified)



Horst: Patterns from Nature
By Martin Barnes
Merrell Publishing
Hardback + jacket
104 pages
50 duotone illustrations



Its title deviating by only the replacement of an apostrophe and an s with a colon, a new publication Horst: Patterns from Nature focusses in on a little-know series of photographs, nine of which appeared in the final pages of the 1946 book, Horst’s Patterns from Nature, augmenting them with a large number of mainly previously unpublished works made around the same time. The book is an expanded version of an essay by distinguished author Martin Barnes that appears in the main catalogue for the current exhibition, Horst, Photographer of Style at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, edited by Susanna Brown, and as such complements the exhibition, while considerably widening our knowledge of the photographer, his methods, and the breadth of his oeuvre.

Photographic pattern, (Calladium)



Photographic pattern, (Xanthosoma Lindenii)



Barnes’ short introduction, succinctly places the esteemed German-born photographer, the former Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann (1906 >1999) – who later took the name Horst P Horst – into historical context. He provides us with an insight into how, starting out as an architectural draughtsman in Le Corbusier’s Paris office in 1930, taught photography by his lover, the great George Hoyningen-Huhené, Horst rose quickly to recognition and fame, becoming friends with Marlene Dietrich, Nöel Coward and Coco Chanel. Barnes describes how, Horst fled German conscription and was spirited away by Vogue to America, becoming a US citizen in 1943. Best known for his slick studio-lit fashion and beauty images – the sexy Mainbocher Corset (1939) perhaps the most well-known – there is evidence to suggest, Barnes explains, that Horst embraced natural light and organic forms towards the end of World War II, as a way of associating himself with such untainted pre-war German cultural figures such as Johan Wolfgang von Goethe (1749 > 1832). Goethe’s definition of art: ‘Art is Nature seen through a temperament,’ is quoted by Alexander Lieberman, a Horst collaborator and art director of American Vogue from 1943 to 1962, in his blurb on the back flap of the dust jacket of the 1946 Patterns book. The front of this jacket is shown inside the new book, as well as a number of the double page spreads that appeared in it. For comparison, examples of work as they appears in books by other revered, early to mid-twentieth century photographers of nature are included, notably by Edward Weston, Paul Strand and German teacher and photographer, Karl Blossfeldt (1864 > 1932), who Horst acknowledged as an important influence.

Via repetition and mirroring techniques, and some influence from surrealism – Horst also collaborated with Salvador Dali – he pushed nature into the realms of semi-abstract pattern. Helpfully, by showing a succession of images – first the single original shot, then a group of four of these fitted together, the top ones a mirror image of those below, followed by a complete picture made up of sixteen images arranged on the same basic principles, Barnes demonstrates how the complete final images were made up. Some of these, in the run of plates, which make up over two thirds of the book’s content, are very graphic, while others are much softer, prettier, almost dream-like. Somewhat reminiscent of the images one sees in a kaleidoscope, but in square rather than circular format, not all of them are constructed solely from close-up shots of plants. For some the photographer has stepped back, thus changing scale in order to include, for instance, large palms trees, or palm fronds together with architectural details, or sections of a wicker chair.

Photographic pattern, (Prunus Pennsylvania Bark)



Photographic pattern, (Palm Trees)



Horst’s Kodak negative album of 1946, fits into the palm of the hand, and is reproduced at actual size in the new book, along with one of the negatives and a representative selection of the contact prints it contains. Barnes discovered that the negatives used to make the original large prints are not the same as those chosen for the construction of the complex patterned images that became the subject of the new publication. Ever the modernist, despite his respect for classical influences, Horst said of these: ‘[They] are photographs shown in simple repeat. The resulting patterns are immediately applicable to industrial fields, such as textiles, wallpaper, carpets, plastics, glass, ceramics, china, leather, bookbinding and jewellery.’ He went on to explain that they were also a demonstration of how modern design can be achieved through modern means. It’s possible that some of them may indeed have made it to a production line somewhere, but, so far, Barnes has been unable to uncover any evidence of this having happened.

Horst: Patterns from Nature is the end-result of inspired and painstaking investigative research by Martin Barnes, who, as it happens, is also Senior Curator of Photographs at the V&A. The images in this book are as surprising as they are beautiful. While the text in photography and art books can sometimes feel like unnecessary padding, here the writing is an integral and indispensable element of the package. Merrell Publishers are pretty choosy about what publishing projects they get involved in, and with obvious relish have gone to town on this slim volume’s production values, reproducing all of the images in exquisite quality duo-tone, spot-varnished on heavy matt coated paper.

All images from Horst: Patterns from Nature
All images © Conde Nast / Horst Estate



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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All Categories | The Blog Will Return Next Week

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

Untitled #1, Norfolk, UK

Untitled #2, Norfolk, UK

Untitled #3, Norfolk, UK

Photographs by Pedro Silmon, 2014




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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier




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All Categories | The Blog Team is on Holiday

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Kielder Water from below the Kielder Observatory, Northumberland, UK

Kielder Observatory, by Charles Barclay Architects, completed 2008

Photographs by Pedro Silmon, 2014




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The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Books | Dankeschoen Karl Blossfeldt

Friday, April 11th, 2014

Bryonia alba
White bryony, tendrils
Photogravure




Karl Blossfeldt
The Complete Published Work
By Hans Christian Adam
Hardcover, 544 pp
13.97 x 19.558 cm / 5.5 x 7.7 ins
Multilingual edition: English, French, German
Published by Taschen, 2014

I happened to be living in Munich, in 1996, when Taschen published an earlier, slightly larger format, softback predecessor of this book that ran to only 96 pages. A German friend, aware of my interests in both plants and gardens, as well as photography, kindly gave this little gem to me as a present. However, I made the dreadful faux pas of blurting out that I had just bought a copy myself only the day before. While I sat there wishing that the ground beneath me would open and swallow me up, my friend, crestfallen and humiliated, took back the present with a rueful smile saying that perhaps it would make a valuable addition to her own book collection.





Polypodiaceae Aspidieae
Polypody, young unrolling leaf
Photogravure




Bryonia alba
White bryony, tendrils
Photogravure




Karl Blossfeldt, (1865 > 1932) was not a photographer. His plant photography was a by-product of the teaching philosophy he developed over thirty years and intended to publish. However the publishing project never came to fruition, nor did his plan to create an archive of plant photographs.

Growing up in the central mountains of Germany, Blossfeldt began his working life as an apprentice modeller in an ironworks before he was granted a scholarship for a drawing course in Berlin. By 1890, having won another drawing scholarship to study nature, he found himself travelling throughout southern Europe, collecting plant specimens, and using Rome as a base. Influenced by his Professor, Moritz Meurer, who was already using his own photography as reference for drawing, Blossfeldt began systematically photographing plants.

Back in Berlin in 1898, by now assistant to the director of the Kunstgewerbeschule and giving drawing lessons, he soon became a permanent instructor teaching ‘Modelling from Plants’. He was appointed professor of the school in 1921. His photographic work having come to the attention of a prominent gallerist, Karl Nierndorf, in 1925, Blossfeldt had his first exhibition the following year, as a result of which his pictures were widely published in periodicals and books on design theory and architecture. Nierndorf having taken over the management of Blossfeldt’s photographic output, arranged to have a book of his prints published under the title Urformen der Kunst / Art Forms in Nature. It received enthusiastic acclaim and quickly became recognised by critics as a major work of photography, leading to a second edition the same year. Wundergarten der Natur / The Magic Garden of Nature, his second book, a continuation of the same theme, was published in the year of his death, 1932. Both books are much sought after by collectors.

A product of the arts and crafts movement of the 19th century and scientific in their presentation and purpose, Karl Blossfeldt’s carefully-lit and simply arranged photographic plant portraits are never clinical; his compelling images of leaves, stems and flowers reveal their subjects’ tactile qualities, their intricacies and often almost magical forms. Pioneering an artistic approach to image-making that would be enormously influential on twentieth century photography – from the still lifes of Irving Penn, the white background portraits of Richard Avedon, to the houses and water towers of Berndt and Hilda Becker – his legacy is one of the most important and most beautiful collections of plant photography ever created.





Aesculus parviflora
Bottle brush, tips of twigs
Photogravure




The book I had bought in 1996 had only the photographer’s name, Karl Blossfeldt, as its title and contained a short, succinct and well-written text by Professor Doktor Rolf Sachsse, who currently teaches History and Theory of Design at the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste (Fine Arts Academy) Saar in Saarbrücken. Moving around a fair bit during the intervening years, somewhere along the line I mislaid my copy. I remember that it had cost me around 20 Deutschmarks, equating to about £8.27 or €10, in today’s money. The original price of Taschen’s bumper Karl Blossfeldt. The Complete Works was £24.99 / €30, however this new 544 page edition is available at a mere £12.99, about €16.00. Its author, Hans Christian Adam is a specialist in historical images, and has published numerous articles and books, including titles on travel and war photography, is the author of Taschen’s Edward Sheriff Curtis: The North American Indian, Eugène Atget: Paris and Berlin, Portrait of a City.

In 2002, my time in Germany drawing to an end, I was justly repaid for my earlier insensitivity and social clumsiness when, having bought another Taschen book Kunst des 20. Jahrhunderts / Art of the 20th Century as an auf wiedersehen – and thank you for your patience – present for my German teacher, an art history student, she promptly handed it back to me with a smile and a Dankeschoen, but telling she already had a copy.





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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Photography | New York Garden City

Friday, October 11th, 2013

Oblivious to the beautiful location – Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building Plaza in the heart of Manhattan, with pool, dancing fountains, and Maidenhair tree resplendent in September sunshine – a woman makes a call on her mobile phone.

Did she fall or was she pushed…? Drama at the sedate Museum of Modern Art Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden, designed in 1953 by Philip Johnson.

Had Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood founder member, the painter Sir John Everett Millais, still been around and encountered this scene on New York’s High Line, he might have been moved to recreate Ophelia (1851-52), set in a modern context.

Images from top
Seagram Building Plaza, 2013
MoMA Sculpture Garden, 2013
The High Line, 2013

All Photographs ©Pedro Silmon

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The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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