Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

Photography | Le Tour by Sebastião Salgado

Friday, July 1st, 2016




France


Sebastião Salgado
Le Tour de France
Polka Galerie
Paris | France
2 > 30 July 2016



France

The Blog team is away, alas not in France, where the 103rd Tour de France begins this Saturday 2 July. Finishing on Sunday 24 July, this year’s cycling race will be made up of 21 stages and covers a total distance of 3,519 kilometres. In 1986, Brazilian documentary photographer and photojournalist, Sebastião Salgado, now 72 year old and famous the world over for his intensely moving images of human suffering and environmental concern, created a surprisingly sedate and unique set of portraits for the French newspaper Liberation, of those patiently waiting for the cyclists to arrive at their towns along the entire Tour route.France

France

France

Sebastião Salgado: Le Tour de France, including a selection of 18 images is on show at Paris’s Polka Galerie throughout July.

All images: Tour de France, 1986 © Sebastião Salgado / Amazonas Images, Courtesy Polka Galerie


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Photography | J.H. Lartigue / On Holiday

Friday, June 10th, 2016

‘Renée Biarritz, August 1930′



J.H.Lartigue ‘The Blink of an Eye’
Michael Hoppen Gallery
London | UK
8 June > 9 August 2016



‘Véra et Arlette, Cannes, Mai, 1927’



‘Florette, Monte Carlo beach, août 1953′



‘Bibi, Arlette and Irène. Cannes, 1929′



‘Coco on the terrace, Neuilly, June 1938’



The Blog team is on holiday.

If you’re in London, we recommend you try to see J.H.Lartigue ‘The Blink of an Eye’ at the Michael Hoppen Gallery. The exhibition is curated by Hoppen himself, together with author and Lartigue enthusiast William Boyd, who recently wrote an excellent piece – that we also recommend you read – about the great master of the snapshot, on The Guardian’s website

All photographs by JH Lartigue © Ministère de la Culture, France / AAJHL
All images courtesy Michael Hoppen Gallery


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Photography | Isolating Thomas Struth

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Tokamak Asdex Upgrade Periphery,
Max Planck IPP, Garching 2009
Chromogenic print



Thomas Struth. Nature & Politics
Martin-Gropius-Bau
Berlin | Germany
11 June > 18 September 2016



Aquarium, Atlanta 2013
Chromogenic print



Surprisingly, German photographer Thomas Struth, who is based in Berlin and is – according to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, which has an unparalleled collection of his work – ‘one of the most important and influential photographers of the last half-century’ hasn’t had a retrospective in the city since 2004.

Having first studied art under Gerhard Richter, then photography under Bernd and Hilla Becher from 1973 to 1980, Struth (b 1954) won a scholarship to New York, where he would produce Streets of New York City, a series of intense, deserted panoramas, that earned him his first solo exhibition there, at MoMA PS1, in 1978.

Catapulted to success, retrospective exhibitions of his work began early in his career –Kunsthalle Bern (1987), Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston (1994), Carré d’Art, Musée d’Art Contemporain, Nîmes (1998), Dallas Museum of Art (2002), Museo de Art de Lima (2005) – and in 2011 London’s Whitechapel Gallery presented Thomas Struth: Photographs 1978 – 2010.

Basilica of the Annunciation,
Nazareth 2014

Inkjet print



Ride, Anaheim 2013
Chromogenic print



Research Vehicle,
Armstrong Flight
Research Center,
Edwards 2014

Inkjet print



But blockbuster retrospectives – as fashionable as they have become – while useful as reminders of the range and chronology of an artist’s development, can be overwhelming affairs that render the viewer, who can at best expect to be left with only an overview, grappling with a surfeit of competing concepts, each vying for their attention, confused and dissatisfied.

Perhaps by not being seen in isolation the work, too, sometimes suffers. Struth’s photographs may appear disarmingly matter-of-fact, but the thought processes behind them is deep and philosophical. Museum Photographs (1989 > 1992) – a large-scale colour series, consisting of voyeuristic observations of crowds of visitors, which reveals how historic paintings exhibited in famous museums are experienced today, requires time and space to be fully appreciated. It can be displayed alongside his earlier black-and-white portraits of individuals and almost unbearably frank depictions of family groups, or with his serene, unpopulated New Pictures from Paradise jungle images of the 1990s, but each of these also deserves proper consideration.

Although it’s only a matter of time before a major retrospective of Struth’s work is shown there, perhaps, for the moment, Berlin is getting it right.

Thomas Struth. Nature & Politics – the photographer’s first exhibition at Martin-Gropius-Bau – is not a retrospective, but a carefully composed survey of just 37 large-format photographs of work from the years 2005 to 2016. It homes in on the photographer’s more recent and ongoing preoccupation with the creation of images of the highly complex apparatus, structures and constructions that humankind is able to imagine and build that shape our everyday, contemporary, existence.

All images by and © Thomas Struth, courtesy Martin-Gropius-Bau


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Photography | Kathy Ryan: Modern Times

Friday, May 6th, 2016

Office Romance, 5:39 p.m. October 30, 2014



Office Romance, 9:15 a.m. August 14, 2014



Office Romance, 9:43 a.m. September 23, 2013



Kathy Ryan
Office Romance
Howard Greenberg Gallery
New York City | USA
Until 19 June 2016



To say that Kathy Ryan knows her subject inside out is an understatement. She shot every image in this exhibition inside the New York Times building – the workplace she loves. But the visual subjects that matter to her are not restricted to architect Renzo Piano’s landmark structure (built 2000-2007); although nowadays her more appropriate title is director of photography, Ryan has been chief picture editor of The New York Times Magazine since 1987.

Office Romance, 10:32 a.m. September 17, 2015



Office Romance, 9:54 a.m. November 20, 2015



Office Romance, 9:59 a.m. August 11, 2013



Ryan is one of the few who commission and select photography for prominent editorial publications who have become legendary. Echoes of legendary photographers’ work – Man RayLaszlo Moholy NagyBerenice AbbotErwin Blumenfeld – are evident in hers, and serve as evidence of the gamut of her visual knowledge. Here the atmosphere pays homage to painter Edward Hopper, there the minimal treatment is reminiscent of some of Frank Stella’s stripe work. However there is nothing nostalgic in her pictures, which were first published on her Instagram feed (kathyryan1 with 96K followers); she has a great talent for commissioning new and interesting contemporary photography, often from unexpected sources, in particular from artist photographers such as Taryn Simon and Thomas Struth, among many others. Kathy Ryan’s own pioneering spirit is reflected in these intimate images from her everyday world.

Each 6 x 6 inch (15.25 x 15.25cm) image produced as an archival pigment print on 14 x 11 inch (35.55 x 27.95cm) paper for Kathy Ryan, Office Romance at Howard Greenberg Gallery, was photographed on Ryan’s iPhone. Office Romance was published in book form by Aperture in 2014.

All images courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery


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Photography | Brasilia, Utopia, and Inertia

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Chamber of Deputies (Annex IX) #2, 2012



Vincent Fournier
‘Brasilia’
The Ravestijn Gallery
Amsterdam | The Netherlands
16 April > 28 May 2016



Brasilia, the purpose-built federal capital of Brazil, constructed from scratch in the middle of the 1950s by urban planner Lucío Costa with landscape designer Roberto Burle Marx and architect Oscar Niemeyer, is grappling with a dilemma. Planned for around 500,000 inhabitants, in 1960 – the year of its inauguration – there were already almost 140,000 people resident in the city. By 1970 the figure had grown to 537,000. It has now reached 2.5m and is growing at a phenomenal rate of almost 3% per year. The question is how to reconcile the pressing needs of the increasing population with the utopian dream on which the city was founded.

The Claudio Santoro - National Theatre,
ceramic tile panel
by Athos Bulcão, 2012



The torpid atmosphere pervading the narrative in Vincent Fournier’s ‘Brasilia’ series seems to imply that a solution, which deals effectively with the situation, if indeed one does emerge, might be a long time in coming. The anonymous single figure in his Chamber of Deputies (Annex IX) #2, 2012, could be looking for an inspired idea in the landscape beyond his circular window. The image conveys no sense of anticipation, but the bored children photographed at The Claudio Santoro National Theatre appear to have been waiting for some time – the security man, a permanent fixture, is rooted to his position.

The Itamaraty Palace - Foreign Relations Ministry,
spiral stairs, 2012



Having been declared a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1987, Brasilia’s extremely strict planning controls ensure that, unlike it’s close contemporary, Le Corbusier’s Chandigarh (still only tentatively listed for UWHS status), which is gradually being eroded and is at risk from the ad hoc mixed development that scars most other Indian cities, and where slum areas have already been established, the pristine Brazilian city’s limits are still easily distinguishable from the expanse of virgin landscape into which it was introduced.

The Itamaraty Palace - Foreign Relations Ministry,
wood and steel panel
by Athos Bulcão, 2012



Inertia stops the energetically curving spiral staircase in Fournier’s photograph of the Foreign Relations Ministry, at The Itamaraty Palace, dead in its tracks, while a busy wood and steel decorative panel at the same location masks a hive of inactivity.

Unesco go so far as to admit that Brasilia is vulnerable to urban development pressure including increased traffic and public transport requirements, but insist that the singular and outstanding value of Lucio Costa’s scheme, ‘which remains wholly preserved, both physically and symbolically’, is not in jeopardy.

The Ravestijn Gallery is showing a selection of 36 photographs from Vincent Fournier’s ‘Brasilia’ series, prints from which form part of the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the LVMH Contemporary Art Foundation in Paris.

All photographs are C-prints on Ilford Fine Art Baryta with white border
All images courtesy The Ravestijn Gallery


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Photography | A Surreality Check

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

Man Ray, Rayograph (Spiral), 1923
Photogram on silver gelatin paper
© Man Ray Trust / 2015, ProLitteris, Zurich



Real Surreal
− Masterpieces of Avant-Garde Photography
The New Look 1920 > 1950
Museum Bellerive
Zürich | Switzerland
1 April  > 24 July 2016



František Drtikol, Circular segment (Arc), 1928
Pigment print
© František Drtikol-heirs, 2015



So familiar are we with the classic artworks of the surrealist era – lobster telephones, bowler-hatted men with apples floating in front of their faces, and fur cups and saucers – that with a little dexterity, we can easily create entertaining images inspired by them ourselves on our computers or tablets and even on our phones. But, perhaps we’ve allowed our idea of what surrealism was, or indeed is, to be confined to just a few stereotypes, while the thinking on which surrealism was founded provided a point of departure for infinitely diverse imagery.

As World War I raged, the Dada movement threw out all the established conventions of what constituted art. Forming in their wake, the surrealists – originally a literary movement established in 1924 that would, after initial reluctance, welcome painters, then photographers – found new inspiration in founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud’s theories about the unconscious and the interpretation of dreams. Taking Freud’s fundamental rule that his patients must be absolutely honest, and never leave anything out, even if it is unpleasant to expose, together with his interest in the internal mental conflicts that kept experiences buried deep within the mind, as the basis for their explorations they would produce art that was unfettered by rules and conformed to no previously-established formulae.

Grete Stern, The Eternal Eye, 1950
Photomontage on silver gelatin paper
© Estate of Grete Stern
Courtesy Galeria Jorge Mara,
La Ruche, Buenos Aires, 2015



Genia Rubin, Lisa Fonssagrives.
Dress: Alix (Grés)
, 1937

Print on silver gelatin paper
© Sheherazade Ter-Abramoff, Paris



Innovative technical developments that emerged in photography at the time rendered the medium far more accessible, allowing the surrealist photographers to be prolific and move rapidly from one experiment to the next. Man Ray would contrive new ways of looking at and presenting subject matter and invented innovative dark room techniques such as solarisation that allowed him to produce prints that were like nothing that had been seen before. He experimented with multiple exposures and produced photograms in the darkroom without a camera.

Bauhaus master László Moholy-Nagy also produced radical surrealist photography, and there is a long list of photographers including Eugène Atget, Herbert Bayer, Hans Bellmer, Brassaï, Florence Henri, Germaine Krull, Herbert List, August Sander and Umbo, among others, some of whom were associated with the movement from its early days, and others who produced surrealist photographs afterwards and right up into the 1950s, each of whom interpreted surrealism from their own individual viewpoint. Real Surreal is an exhibition of the extraordinary work of these photographers, among which certain stylistic approaches to mood, lighting and sometimes propping was common, and form a discernible link, but that bristles with unparalleled innovation in terms of ideas that combine to form the influential and enduring legacy of the movement.

Albert Renger-Patzsch, Self-portrait, 1926/27
Print on silver gelatin paper
© Albert Renger Patzsch Archiv /
Ann und Jürgen Wilde, Köln / 2015,
ProLitteris, Zurich



From the 1960s up until his death in 1991, the French fashion photographer Guy Bourdin, who had first-hand inspiration from Man Ray himself, produced powerful, often shocking and incredibly stylish images, borne out of a surrealist mindset, without ever falling into the trap of aping his hero’s work.

It’s apparent in the work of contemporary fine art photographers such as Cindy Sherman, who approaches her compelling self-portraits from a standpoint which asserts that identity lies in appearance, not in reality, that it remains possible to create work from a unique surrealist perspective. Younger photographers, too, like Amsterdam-based Viviane Sassen, who, having looked hard at the original surrealist imagery then put it to one side, are creating fresh and intense, original work – the stuff that dreams are made of.

Previously shown at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg in Germany, Real Surreal − Masterpieces of Avant-Garde Photography is showing around 220 works from The Dietmar Siegert Collection.

Related event
Neues Sehen Photographs of
the 1920 and 1930s
from the
Ann und Jürgen Wilde Collection

Pinakothek der Moderne
Munich | Germany
Until 30 September 2016

All images courtesy Museum Bellerive


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Art | Nasreen Mohamedi Meets Taca Sui in New York

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Nasreen Mohamedi, Untitled, c 1975
Ink and graphite on paper
Sikander and Hydari Collection



Nasreen Mohamedi
The Met Breuer
NYC | USA
18 March > 5 June 2016

+

Taca Sui: Steles – Huang Yi Project
Chambers Fine Art
NYC | USA
31 March > 28 May 2016



Taca Sui, Tomb of Prince Lu #2, 2015
Archival pigment print on baryta paper



One relatively young and having established his reputation fairly recently, the other being afforded posthumous, retrospective acclaim, parallels, contrasts and coincidences exist between their respective work and the life stories of two Asian artists of different generations, who almost certainly never met, but have shows opening in New York.

Indian modernist Nasreen Mohamedi (1937–1990) was brought up in Mumbai, often, like New York, described with the epithet ‘the city that never sleeps’. Fine art photographer, Taca Sui was born in Qingdao, like New York, albeit smaller, a port city of skyscrapers. In the mid-1950s, Mohamedi would travel to London to study at Central Saint Martin’s School of Art, while having attended the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing in 2003, Taca went to the United States to continue his studies in 2005.

Taca Sui, Pagoda of Six Harmonies, 2015
Archival pigment print on baryta paper



Nasreen Mohamedi, Untitled, c 1975
Ink and graphite on paper
Sikander and Hydari Collection



The work of both artists is essentially monochrome, but whereas painter, photographer and draughtswoman Mohamedi, influenced by Russian suprematist Kazimir Malevich – a founding father of abstract art – among others, made non-representational paintings, semi-abstract photographs and drawings that bear no relation to Indian traditional art, Taca, who left college to assist American abstract expressionist painter Ronnie Landfield – well-known for his use of vibrant colour –produces work that is strongly rooted in China’s landscape, his images relate to geographic locations suggested in classical Chinese literature and are tied to the history, myths and religious traditions of ancient Han culture.

The calmness of mood in Taca’s work, and the reduction of the elements that make up each image, brings to mind Japanese minimalist Hiroshi Sugimoto’s photography, but the artists’ approach to and treatment of respective subject matter is entirely dissimilar. More redolent of the Italian futurist architect Antonio Sant’Elia’s drawings, Mohamedi’s graphic work has drawn comparisons with that of minimalist sculptor Carl Andre. It would be a mistake to label either Mohamedi or Taca as minimalist.

Nasreen Mohamedi, Untitled, c 1972
Gelatin silver print
Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi



Taca Sui, Feilai Peak, 2015
Archival pigment print on baryta paper



On the road to success: their work transformed by their experiences abroad, neither artist completely abandoned their own country for life in the west. Nasreen Mohamedi, having worked for a time in Europe and after spending time in Bahrain, travelled extensively through India, Iran and Turkey, visiting Japan and the USA, before returning to India in the early 1970s to teach in the Faculty of Fine Arts at MS University in Baroda (now Vadodara), while Taca Sui is now based in both Beijing and New York.

Joined in spirit, located in disparate areas of New York, Nasreen Mohamedi opens today at Madison Avenue’s The Met Breuer on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, while Taca Sui: Steles – Huang Yi Project starts in two weeks’ time at Chambers Fine Art in Chelsea, afterwards the shows run concurrently.

All Nasreen Mohamedi images courtesy The Met Breuer
All Taca Sui images courtesy Chambers Fine Art


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Architecture | All Hail the Image Resolution!

Friday, January 29th, 2016

The Leadenhall Building, London, UK
Photograph by Mark Gorton
Architects Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners



Philharmonic Hall, Szczecin, Poland
Photograph by Laurian Ghinitoiu
Architect Estudio Barozzi & Veiga



Building Images
Sto Werkstatt
London | UK
5 February > 25 March 2016



The winners of the Arcaid Images Architectural Photography Awards 2015, showcasing the world’s most renowned architectural photographers, were announced in early November at The World Architecture Festival 2015, so it’s very likely that regular subscribers to daily newsletters from architecture and design sites such as Designboom or Dezeen, or those who follow the likes of ArchDaily or Architizer on Twitter, have already seen these pictures: or at least some of them, albeit fleetingly, online, as here, at 72 dpi.

Overall Winner 2015
EPFL Quartier Nord, Ecublens, Switzerland
Photograph by Fernando Guerra
Architect Richter Dahl Rocha & Associés



Sede Transforma, Torres Vedras, Portugal
Photograph by Fernando Guerra
Architect Pedro Gadanho + CVDB



But looking at photography only on our computers, on our tablets or on our phones does the images and their respective photographers little justice. We may be able to scan a tremendous volume of architecture images every day in this way, but whereas a few single images – usually of buildings designed by famous architects – might have the power to stick in our minds, the majority tend to blend into one amorphous mass, soon to be replaced by another. And besides, architecture is generally concerned with scale and space, elements that are not easily transported at low resolution from within the confines of a laptop monitor, and tend to appear coarse and lacking in detail on larger screens.

De Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Photograph by Ryan Koopmans
Architect Rem Koolhaas OMA



Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai, China
Photograph by Su Shengliang
Architect Atelier Deshaus



Yick Cheong Building, Hong Kong
Photograph by Lingfei Tan + Song Han
Public housing development



There are a great number of hard copy architecture magazines in which the winning images from this competition and even some of the runners up will also have appeared, where the photographs can be better examined and appreciated, providing they were well laid out. But if this wasn’t the case, the printing was a bit off, or the pictures were overwhelmed by text, their quality may have been compromised, or they could have been denied their potential in terms of scale.

As Lynne Bryant, co-founder of Arcaid Images, reminds us, ‘…the earliest known image [View from the Window at Le Gras, 1826 or 1827 by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce] taken with a camera obscura, could be said to be architectural,’ therefore as a genre architectural photography is particularly worthy of our respect and should be treated with due dignity.

It might be stating the obvious, but the advantage of visiting the Building Images exhibition at Sto Werkstatt is that all the Arcaid Images Architectural Photography Awards 2015 winning pictures, and all of the runners up, are each displayed at their best, as large, high resolution prints, all accurately credited and captioned. The experience must knock the socks off  viewing these photographs by any other method.

All images courtesy Sto Wekstatt and Arcaid, © the photographers


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Photography | Man v Nature: An Interface Acted Out

Friday, January 15th, 2016

Joshua Tree (CA), 2002

Taft (CA), 2008

Joshua Tree (CA), 2007

Joshua Tree (CA), 2002

Claremont (CA), 2004

Twentynine Palms (CA), 2002

Sierra Nevada (CA), 2007



Marie-José Jongerius
‘The Magic Tree’
The Ravestijn Gallery
Amsterdam  | Netherlands
16 January > 27 February 2016



Distant, challenging, imbued with obscure meaning: if the British performance artist, model, and fashion icon Tilda Swinton was a landscape, she might resemble the photographs in this exhibition. There’s no denying that Swinton has an enigmatic stage presence that is impossible to ignore, on which her success is based, and these images demand attention for the same reasons. Produced in the hot, dry landscapes spanning the south-western United States, from the Pacific Ocean to the mountaintops of Sierra Nevada and down to the Mojave Desert, despite the golden light – like Swinton’s various personae – each studiously muted  image, resonates with coldness rather than warmth.

Marie-José Jongerius at work



At first sight, the seemingly empty, innocuous snatches of landscape might be an amateur’s snapshots from a road-trip to nowhere, but seasoned Dutch photographer Marie-José Jongerius’s photographs are carefully choreographed scenes in which she employs trees to act out the uneasy relationship between man and nature in this arid region, where the artificial interfaces awkwardly with the organic world.

While Marie-José Jongerius ‘The Magic Tree’ at The Ravestijn Gallery is restricted to only the seven large format images shown here, sixty of her landscape works can be found in the two volume book set Edges of the Experiment – The Making of the American Landscape (2015), which we blogged about in April 2015.

Main images courtesy The Ravestijn Gallery, © Marie-José Jongerius.
Portrait by Marcello Scopelliti


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Books | Flying in the Face of Adversity

Friday, January 8th, 2016


Burkitshi horsemen hunt with eagles in the Altai mountains of western Mongolia



Hunting with Eagles
In the Realm of the Mongolian Kazakhs
Photographs by Palani Mohan
Published by Merrell
Hardcover + jacket
128 pp / 85 duotone illustrations
Available now



The exotically dressed chap with an eagle perched on his gloved hand set in a dramatic, mountainous landscape, on the front cover of this book, might be modelling Alexander McQueen menswear. Only he’s not. The photograph could be an example from an early 20th century anthropological study similar, say, to Martin Gusinde’s formidable work on the tribes of Tierra del Fuego. But it isn’t. It was taken just recently by Indian-born, Hong Kong-based photographer Palani Mohan in the wilderness of the vast and isolated Altai mountains of western Mongolia, close to its borders with China and Russia, and shows a real life, nomadic Kazakh using a golden eagle to hunt his prey, just as his ancestors have done for hundreds of years before him.

Unusual clouds form at high altitudes as the wind rises over the mountains



While the subject matter is lent a heroic, even stylish dimension by the photographs it is, nevertheless, infused with pathos. Ethnic Kazakhs, numbering around 100,00 are Mongolia’s largest minority, but no more than fifty to sixty true eagle-hunters or burkitshi, as they are known locally, are left. ‘I have an important job to do’, Mohan told Orazkhan, one of the oldest and wisest of the men who hunt with eagles, who sipped yak’s milk tea while howling winter winds brought fresh snow to the desolate valley outside, ‘to document the burkitshi before they disappear.’ And over the years he photographed them, Mohan would learn the intimate details of their relationship with the birds that are integral to the existence of these stoic people. How they take female eagles – larger and more powerful than the males – from the nest as pups then treat them as part of the family. How the burkitshi hand-feed the eaglets – as they do their own children – to develop a bond of trust, even love, before training them to hunt their prey: the foxes that provide food for the hunters’ wives and children, whose pelts are made into the warm clothing that is essential for survival in the harsh Altai climate. It is this close family bond that ensures the mature eagles return to present their kill to the hunters. Poignantly, however, after ten to fifteen years, the eagles past their prime, all bonds must be broken and every bird returned – with the reluctance of all parties involved – to the wild.

Golden eagles – like children – are treated as part of the family



Exceptionally well-printed – perhaps appropriately, in nearby China – on premium quality smooth coated paper, Merrell PublishersHunting with Eagles is simply designed in the tradition of the best documentary photography books, with all of the emphasis on Palani Mohan’s extraordinary pictures, which, judging by those on his website, are the most accomplished he has produced to date.

All photographs courtesy Merrell Publishers
© Palani Mohan







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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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