Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

All Categories | Storms, Smoke & Power Cuts

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

Apologies!
Due to a combination of wild storms that blew smoke from the wood fire back down the chimney, setting off  alarms in every room, and covered everything in a fine layer of soot, and the power cut that, in amongst all of this, plunged our friends’ isolated, converted corn mill where we were staying into deep, velvety darkness, The Blog isn’t posting this week.

In the meantime, you might like to take a look at our reminder of the diverse range of international visual arts and events-related subjects we posted in 2014.

Best wishes for 2015



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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All Categories | Omnipresence 2014 / 2015

Friday, December 26th, 2014

2014 proved to be an exciting year at The Blog.

We published posts relating to exhibitions as diverse as Egon Schiele; The Radical Nude at London’s Courtauld Gallery, and Robert Heinecken: Object Matter at MoMA in New York, to another about VKhUTEMAS – often called the Russian Bauhaus – at Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Bau museum. We admired rare and exotic posters in The Art of Travel, exhibited at Cannes during the annual film festival and auctioned afterwards by Christie’s.

We showed a selection of compelling images from Roxanne Lowit Photographs Yves Saint Laurent, a glitzy new book – with an introduction by no less a figure than Pierre Bergé – and wrote about Vitra’s more modest new publication Everything is Connected, which relies totally on visual language rather than written text to relate the company’s labyrinthine story.

We loved Korean artist Lee Bul’s captivating installations at the UK’s Ikon Gallery in Birmingham, and the Museum für Gestaltung’s 100 Years of Swiss Design exhibition – as well as the accompanying Lars Müller book – showing selections from the Museum’s consolidated collections, now housed at the Schaudepot in Zürich’s burgeoning New Toni development.

We covered the Saul Steinberg 100th Anniversary Exhibition at Pace MacGill in New York, and we assembled our own photographic tribute to The Years of ‘La Dolce Vita’, from the paparazzi images on show at the Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, in London.

We published extracts from Christie’s International Head of 20th Century Decorative Art & Design Philippe Garner’s scintillating interview with Zeev Aram, on the subject of Japanese furniture designer Shiro Kuramata. And we salivated over Serge Mouille’s 1950s sculptural lighting included in Phillips Design sale in New York.

We hope the journey so far has been as interesting for you as it has for us.

As the globe – at least in communication terms – continues to shrink, the cultural landscape forever widens and diversifies. What was formerly remote has often become more easily accessible. In response, 2015 will see The Blog extending its reach and venturing into geographical and subject areas we may have so far ignored, exploring and gaining entry for our followers to a broader range of thought-provoking, disparate and topical events in the omnipresent visual arts and associated artistic disciplines.



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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All Categories | The Blog Will Return Next Week

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

Untitled #1, Norfolk, UK

Untitled #2, Norfolk, UK

Untitled #3, Norfolk, UK

Photographs by Pedro Silmon, 2014




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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier




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All Categories | The Blog Team is on Holiday

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Kielder Water from below the Kielder Observatory, Northumberland, UK

Kielder Observatory, by Charles Barclay Architects, completed 2008

Photographs by Pedro Silmon, 2014




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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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All Categories | The Blog is on Holiday

Friday, September 6th, 2013

This Way, 2012, Pedro Silmon

Our Mapplethorpe Curated by Huppert blog post was published early this week

Watch out for our next post on, or around, September 27th

Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, gardens, books, design and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Art | Sounding Out MoMA

Friday, August 9th, 2013

Soundings: A Contemporary Score
The Museum of Modern Art
New York City, USA
10th August – 3rd November, 2013

Galleries and museums, except on private view evenings, when most people – rather than looking at what’s on the walls or arranged on the floor – go to see and be seen, to have a couple of free drinks, and perhaps to hob-nob with the artist, when the sound of endless How-are-yous, How’re-you-doins, Haven’t-seen-you-since-the-such-and-such-openings, loud introductions, air-kissing mwah-mwahs!, excited chit-chat and raucous laughter fill the air, are generally quiet, contempletive places, where one is hardly aware of the gentle scrape of leather on polished parquet, the squeak of rubber on polished concrete, the slow, broken clatter of Louboutin heels, the odd whispered praise, questioning, or muffled criticism.

Soundings: A Contemporary Score, the title of MoMA’s first major ’show’ of sound art begs the question what can one expect to see? Quite a lot, actually. The exhibition, which, echoing the rebellious nature of sound itself, struggling against containment, permeates the museum, occupying the Special Exhibitions Gallery on the third floor, drifting down the Bauhaus staircase, and bursting out into the Sculpture Garden, includes architectural interventions, visualisations of inaudible sound, field recordings with accompanying videos on subjects as diverse as bats, abandoned buildings in Chernobyl, New York City bells, and a sugar factory in Taiwan.

Sixteen innovative, international artists working with sound, have been invited to contribute and to make as much, or as little noise as they like, and at a time when personal listening devices are commonplace – those who wander around exhibitions like zombies, moving from one exhibit to the next, wearing headphones, must be pointedly ignored and studiously avoided – the art they create is not anti-social, but rather intended to connect visitors via communal immersion in sound fields and through installations that provide a shared experience.

Camille Norment’s Triplight, the title of which refers to the song lyric ‘trip the light fantastic’, started with an iconic 1955 Shure microphone – the model used by Billie Holliday, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, and other legendary jazz singers – from which the artist removed the internal parts, replacing them with a small flickering light. The light casts a shadow, projecting onto the wall what might be a luminescent rib cage, evocative of an absent performer.

Travelling to remote corners of the earth – for Disco Bay (2007) she visited Greenland – to make field recordings, Jana Winderen uses hydrophones (sensitive underwater microphones) to collect sounds inaudible or inaccessible to unassisted human ears, which she painstakingly pieces together to construct sound collages.

A Bell for Every Minute (2010), commissioned by among others, Friends of the High Line, from American artist, Stephen Vitiello, and reminiscent in essence of Christian Marclay’s phenomenally successful film, The Clock, consists of recordings of fifty-nine bells from around New York, one for every minute, including the famous New York Stock Exchange bell, the well-known United Nations (Japanese) Peace Bell, but also bicycle bells, those attached to cats’ collars, and alarm bells.

Perhaps the most visual soundings in the exhibition are the series Scores and Transcripts (2012) by Christine Sun Kim – born deaf – who combines elements of American sign language, musical notation, spoken English and body language into large expressive drawings. ‘This work is a re-enactment of the unconscious sound I make while concentrating,’ she says, ‘I asked Mader (her partner) to describe my unconscious sound in a short text. Then I attempted to re-enact his description like one would re-enact a murder scene with actors and props.’ Screaming is not allowed within the precincts of the museum.

Images from top
Christine Sun Kim, All. Night., 2012
From the series Scores and Transcripts
Score, pastel, pencil, and charcoal on paper

Camille Norment, Triplight, 2008
Microphone cage, stand, light, electronics
Courtesy the artist

Hong-Kai Wang, still from Music While We Work, 2011
Multi-channel sound and two-channel video installation
Courtesy the artist

Marco Fusinato, Mass Black Implosion (Shaar, Iannis Xenakis), 2012
Ink on archival facsimile of score, Part 1 of 5 parts
Courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne & Sydney

Stephen Vitiello, A Bell for Every Minute, 2010
5-channel sound installation with aluminum sound map
Commissioned by Creative Time, Friends of the High Line
and the City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation
Photo Stephen Vitiello


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, gardens, books, design and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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