Posts Tagged ‘Chanel’

Fashion | Vintage Couture Sale You Can’t Afford to Miss

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

Chanel haute couture, 1963
Black sequined cocktail dress from the wardrobe of Romy Schneider
Estimate €1,500 > 2,500



Rencontres Couture à Paris
de la Collection Didier Ludot
/
Paris Encounter with Couture
from the Didier Ludot Collection
Sotheby’s
Paris | France
Exhibition 4 > 8 July 2015
Sale 4:00 CEST 8th July 2015



Thierry Mugler, S/S 1990
‘Rainbow jacket’ in gabardine wool
Estimate €500 > 700



A stone’s throw from the Louvre, in Paris’s premier arrondissement, in the prestigious Palais Royale, La Petite Robe Noire is dedicated to original haute couture versions of the little black dress. ‘A magical garment which exacerbates the femininity of a woman,’ according to Didier Ludot, who was so besotted with it that he opened the shop in 1999, designed his own line that is also sold there, and went so far as to publish a book on the subject. La Petite Robe Noire is one of three shops, the first established in 1975, all owned by Ludot, around the Palais Royal, one specialising in evening couture, the other in ready-to-wear, where – although you may not be able to afford to buy anything – you can touch, feel, and even try on some of the most extraordinary, and impeccably-detailed items of clothing ever produced. Chanel, Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, Givenchy, Balmain, Lanvin, John Galliano, Yohji Yamamoto and Hermes, are among the many other famous names in couture that appear on the labels.

Yves Saint Laurent haute couture, A/W 1977 > 1978
Velvet strapless sheath, edged in spiralling flounces of shot wine and green taffeta
Estimate €1,500 > 2,500



Pierre Cardin haute couture, 1966
Pink wool cape with circlet armholes and glass bauble buttons
Estimate €1,200 > 1,800



Schiaparelli haute couture, S/S 1938
‘Circus’ collection. Silk crepe gown printed with designs after Marcel Vertès
Estimate €2,000 > 3,000



Each piece is carefully selected for its technical skill, its beauty, the trademark style of the couturier who created it, and often simply for the elegance of the woman or man – Ludot also stocks menswear – who wore it. Ludot’s vintage collection provides a comprehensive overview of 20th century fashion, and is a tribute to the expertise of the designers, tailors, embroiderers, leatherworkers, feather merchants and lace makers responsible for its creation.

Elegant dressers themselves, Ludot’s mother and grandmother’s wardrobes were always fit to burst with clothes they diligently copied from haute couture. As a small boy, he had attended the fittings and has been specialising and dealing in the fashion business himself for over 40 years. He also curates exhibitions, using his exclusive shop windows as gallery space.

Balenciaga haute couture, A/W 1965 > 1966
Evening dress in satin covered in ostrich feathers
Estimate €6,000 > 8,000



Commes des Garçons by Rei Kawakubo A/W 2000 > 2001
‘Punk’ collection. Tartan jacket with tousled, tasselled hem
Estimate €700 > 900



Needless to say, Ludot’s much written about shops are a mecca for the international fashion crowd, among them American Vogue’s Hamish Bowles, who is a fellow collector and loves to compare notes with him. The rich and famous are discreet visitors, too, but a selection of Ludot’s vintage haute couture is also available to buy in the luxury department stores: Printemps, London’s Harrods and New York’s Barneys. And now, his private collection having grown so large, he has decided to sell over 170 exceptional items via auction at Sotheby’s in Paris, in their Rencontres Couture à Paris de la Collection Didier Ludot sale, next week. ‘Sotheby’s is very chic,’ he told Style.com at the auction house, ‘the first couture show I ever saw was right in this very spot, around 1970.’

All images courtesy Sotheby’s Paris, © Sotheby’s Paris


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Exhibition | The Architecture of Fashion

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Tour LVMH, Manhattan, New York,
by Atelier Christian de Portzamparc, 1995 > 1999

Photo © Atelier Christian de Portzamparc



Archimode
Six architects for fashion
Villa Noailles
Hyères | France
22 February > 22 March 2015




Mobile Art by Zaha Hadid Architects for Chanel 2008
Top, in Hong Kong, above, in New York
Photos © François Lacour



The Mobile Art Chanel Contemporary Art Container – to give it its full title – Karl Lagerfeld and Zaha Hadid’s touring pavilion, was conceived in 2007 when the design magazine Wallpaper* got the unlikely couple together for a photo shoot. Making its first appearance in Hong Kong in March 2008, the travelling pavilion, showcasing the work of twenty leading international artists, each inspired by Chanel’s quilted 2.55 bag, visited Tokyo and New York before it was given a permanent home in 2011 at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris – designed, incidentally, by another famous architect, Jean Nouvel.

Beneath the heading, ‘Chanel, Hugo Boss, Rick Owens: Fashion’s Latest Muse Is Architecture’, in summer 2014, writer Nick Remsen explained on the vogue.com website, ‘There’s a certain modishness – and beauty – in the urban blueprint, its pylons and crosswalks and anterooms rife for creative repurposing. I wasn’t particularly surprised, then, to see Karl Lagerfeld close his Emirati resort 2015 show via looks embellished with motifs of the world’s tallest building, the local Burj Khalifa [830m to tip].’ Soon afterwards, Lagerfeld showed Chanel’s fall 2014 couture collection, citing building materials, including concrete, as a inspiration, ‘Le Corbusier goes to Versailles!’ he told Vogue’s Hamish Bowles.

Remarkable and unique as it was, and remains, Mobile Art was not the first instance of a relationship between architecture and fashion, a phenomenon which dates as far back as the first decades of the 20th century – if not further – when opinionated, pioneering, Viennese functionalist architect, Adolf Loos (1870 > 1933), asserted that the naked woman is unattractive to man, and told the world that women dress and ornament themselves to appeal to man’s sickly sensuality. Fervent anti-ornamentalist, Loos, in his book Why a man should be well-dressed, didn’t confine his critical interest in fashion to women. The list of built works attributed to him includes an office building, several villas and houses, a café, a bar, and between 1910 and 1913 he designed the men’s haberdashery Kníže’s second floor, and later its shop front. Oddly, illustrating his story with amusing images of badly-dressed architects and their buildings, Hadley Freeman explained on The Guardian website, in 2008, that architects as a group ‘are just as style-conscious as fashion designers.’ On the other hand, in an interview on the Dezeen site last year, world-renowned Australian industrial designer Marc Newson, who has dabbled in architecture – Azzedine Alaia Boutique, Paris, 2006 – Qantas First Class Lounge, Sydney, 2007 – said, ‘Most industrial designers don’t have a clue about fashion… There’s never very successful crossovers, creatively.’ Putting the problem down to the ‘terrible snobbery’ between the two industries, Newson summed up by saying that the fashion industry was faster, more efficient and more in tune with contemporary culture than design and architecture.

Kris Van Assche Boutique, Paris, by Ciguë, 2013
Photo © Maris Mezulis



In London, Casablanca-born Joseph Ettedgui, who, with his family, established the Joseph brand and retail chain in 1972, achieved success through his ability to spot up-and-coming talent, working with many young designers and architects before they became famous. In the early years, well before the brand was sold and went global, Kenzo Takada, Margaret Howell, Katharine Hamnett, John Galliano and Azzedine Alaïa produced collections of clothes for Joseph, while Norman Foster, Eva Jiricná and Andrée Putman designed the company’s shops and restaurants.

Between 1993 and 1995, British architect John Pawson built the Calvin Klein Collections Store in New York, followed closely by the flagship Jigsaw Store in London. As Archie Juinio observed on the vogue.it website, ‘Since the ‘90s important changes have taking place in the business strategies for fashion: big groups have bought prestigious fashion houses, while flagship stores have acquired an essential importance in marketing strategies. In this scenario, the architect is called upon and assumes a key role: he or she has to translate their ideas into tangible forms, underlining the brand’s values.’

Before she dedicated herself to the pursuit of stricter, modernist design and architectural ideals – which owed much to Loos and his many followers across Europe – Eileen Gray had designed the art deco front of her Paris furniture and home accessories shop, Jean Desert, in 1922, where wealthy avant-garde patrons Elsa Schiaparelli, and Charles and Marie-Laure de Noailles, keen to experience a different kind of living, would congregate. The Noailles would commission architect Robert Mallet-Stephens to design their modernist Villa Noailles in Hyères, the venue for the forthcoming Archimode: Six architects for fashion exhibition, which includes, among others, Zaha Hadid’s Mobile Art for Chanel, Prada Transformer by Rem Koolhaas OMA in Séoul, and the Tour LVMH building by Christian de Portzamparc in New York. It also features work by less well-known contemporary architects, Diplomates, who designed the Boutique Damir Doma, as well as Ciguë’s Boutique Isabel Marant and Boutique Kris Van Assche.

Photos courtesy Villa Noailles



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due must be borne by the source supplier



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mouth2mouth | Philip Treacy on Photography

Friday, February 1st, 2013

mouth2mouth | interview
philip treacy | milliner

Over 30 of his hats were worn at HRH Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding. Probably the world’s best-known hat designer, Philip Treacy began his career in 1990, in London, having been taken under the wing of the late Isabella Blow. Milliner of choice for many top fashion designers, he created hats for Alexander McQueen’s white haute couture collection at Givenchy, for Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel, as well as for Valentino, Ralph Lauren and Donna Karen. In 2000 Treacy was invited to present the first ever Paris couture show dedicated to millinery. Named British Accessory Designer of the Year five times at the British Fashion Awards, he created hats for film – Harry Potter – for Grace Jones, Daphne Guinness, Naomi Campbell, Lady Gaga and Madonna. A new book, Philip Treacy by Kevin Davies, the result of a 20-year collaboration between the milliner and his long-time friend, photographer Kevin Davies, is published in February by Phaidon. Former creative director at Tatler turned photographer, Pedro Silmon asked Treacy about his passion for photography and photographers.

In the introduction to your and photographer Kevin Davies’ book you say that every hat you ever made began, in your mind, as a photograph. Who is the photographer?
Always Irving Penn. He was the quintessential hat photographer.

A hat is an idea. A suggestion. A hat isn’t an inanimate object you put on your head – it’s supposed to do something – you’re drawing with material to create an illusion. I identify with photographers because they’re doing the same thing as I am.

Is there a particular genre of photographer you like best?
Iconic Hollywood. Greta Garbo’s photographer, Clarence Sinclair-Bull, George Hurrell. Those I discovered in the books I saw for the first time when I went to art college in Dublin. The photographers who invented glamour and made people look beautiful: Hoynigen-Huhne, Edward Steichen, Horst, Cecil Beaton, Angus McBean.

Which other photographers’ work do you like?
Helmut Newton. He was very persuasive and impressed me so much with his charm that I felt I couldn’t seriously say no when he asked to photograph me, who hates having his photograph taken – topless!
Bruce Weber is amazing. His black and white is really colour. So many tones… He put my hats on male models. Such a simple idea but it worked and just looked fantastic. Avedon asked me to make a hat specifically for an Egoïste cover he was shooting with Stephanie Seymour as the model. He was like a teenager – full of energy – really excitable.

Photographers are engaging and obsessive and I understand that. I like photographers that have a point of view and who put their stamp on a picture as if they’ve painted it. You can always tell a Sarah Moon, a Deborah Turbeville, a Paolo Roversi – they have a signature look and extraordinary personality. People like Nick Knight continue experimenting but his pictures are always identifiably his. I like David LaChapelle, who’s charming and has amazing vision. Although I haven’t worked with him a lot, I find Steven Meisel’s work exceptional and unusual – unlike anyone else’s.
One of the biggest influences on me and someone who has been a great inspiration, is Jean-Paul Goude. He’s so talented he doesn’t need to be an arse-hole. He’s a intriguing and charismatic. A designer’s dream. He has incredible ideas that are so simple they show he’s a genius.

What about newer photographers?
I think Mert & Marcus are great. They asked me to make a lace mask for them for the 90th Anniversary cover of French Vogue (2010). I’ve also been working with the German photographer, Cathleen Naundorf, who produces massive, very stylised polaroids.

Which photographers you haven’t enjoyed working with, and why?
I don’t think I’ve come across any… Photographers are like a race of people. I like working with them all.

Sometimes my hats are sent out by publicists to be photographed and I hate it when the photographer tries to do something edgy that just doesn’t work. The best photographers just photograph the hats – no tricks.

Do you like to go on shoots?
Shoot culture has become very irritating and makes going to a shoot daunting experience. So many people. And every time an image pops up on the computer screen, everyone has something to say. I remember when it was the photographer’s point of view that was important. That’s why I was such a fan of Irving Penn, who once took a portrait of me for American Vogue in his little glass-roofed Paris studio, where there was no lighting, no assistant, just a simple chair and a small table, his little camera, him and his charm. Fascinating!…

Do you collect photographs?
I have two wonderful Penn prints – one black and white, one colour – and five of Garbo by Clarence Sinclair Bull, plus a few others by Bruce Weber, Arthur Elgort and Ellen von Unwerth.

Do you have a preference for black and white or colour photographs?
I prefer black and white – it’s more dramatic. But it depends… Colour is a different language. Black and white is more romantic… But, I don’t see it in black and white. I love all the colours in it. What I also love are the really dark pictures that people like Clarence Sinclair Bull did in the 1920s and 30s. The pictures were about darkness, not about light – a lot of photography now is too bright.

You mention in the book that there were always photographers around the studio at 69 Elizabeth Street in the 1990s. Who were they?
Isabella (Blow) was always bringing people in: Michael Roberts, Alastair Thain – all absolutely obsessed – it was wonderful, manic!

Do other photographers still come in or does Kevin now have exclusive access?
They do, Yes. Kevin doesn’t have exclusive access but with him it’s not in your face. He’s a one man band. Quiet. Not loud. Easy. Often, I don’t notice he’s around. I didn’t really understand the pictures when he first starting doing them. They seemed to be the opposite of what people would imagine – not really about the hats, more about the environment. Now I have some of them framed and up on the wall.

Which photographers’ work is on your mood board right now?
… Everybody’s! Because I’m developing another book, with Rizzoli, that won’t be out for another couple of years.

Images from top
In the Studio, 10th February, 1999

The Royal Wedding, Battersea Studio, 27th April, 2011

In the Studio, 69, Elizabeth Street, 11th November

Images by Kevin Davies from the book
Philip Treacy by Kevin Davies
Phaidon
www.phaidon.com
192 pages, hardback, £39.95/€49.95, February 2013

All photographs © Philip Treacy

Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, gardens, books, design and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Photography | Ellen von Unwerth

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Ellen von Unwerth: Do Not Disturb!
Michael Hoppen Gallery, London, UK
Until 21st July, 2012
You go to D+V Management’s website. Ellen von Unwerth being European, you select the London option rather than USA. You go to Artists + Production, then to Photographers. The list is alphabetical. Few of the names mean an awful lot and at the bottom is Ellen’s. Out of idle curiosity, to see if she’s also listed under USA, you give that a go as well. This time, at the top of the list, is Ellen von Unwerth. Funnily enough, the US list is also alphabetical, but here an exception appears to be made to give prominence to one of the most talented and commercially successful fashion photographers, male or female, of the last 20+ years.

Circus performer, turned model – she modelled for 10 years – turned photographer, Von Unwerth (54) learned how to use a camera from her photographer boyfriend and – after an early shoot with a then unknown Claudia Schiffer for the jeans company Guess? that shot her to fame – quickly became sought after by magazines such as Vogue, Vanity Fair, Interview, The Face and i-D. There followed album cover work for Duran Duran, Janet Jackson and later Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, then Rhianna. Among many other celebrities von Unwerth has photographed Kate Moss, Vanessa Paradis, Lindsay Lohan, Dita von Teese, Carla Bruni, Eva Green and Monica Bellucci. Many of these appeared in Fraülein her celebration of our era’s sexiest female icons (Taschen, 2009). Ever popular with the international fashion crowd, she is listed as one of Time magazine’s 100 Fashion Icons. Her major advertising campaigns include Victoria’s Secret, Banana Republic, Lacoste, Diesel, and Chanel. Her acclaimed photo-novella Revenge (Twin Palms, 2002) was accompanied by exhibitions in New York, Paris, Amsterdam, Hamburg, Moscow and Beijing. She’s directed film, too, for fashion houses and made commercials for Revlon and Clinique.
Apart from the up-dating of the fashion content – and much the same could be said of the work of German-Austrian photographer Helmut Newton, who died in 2004 and with whom Frankfurt-born von Unwerth draws obvious comparisons and who she herself has cited as an influence – there is little to differentiate her current work from that which she produced at the start of her career as a photographer. In her case, that’s a good thing because in an era where the real world takes Botox and cosmetic sugery for granted and the imagined world of fashion photography is dominated by artifice – digital images are often retouched to such a degree that the models become little more than sexless avatars, posed within hyper-real environments – von Unwerth’s work remains fresh, genuine, unaffected and good fun. Undoubtedly, to a large degree, this is the result of her continuing preference for using 35mm film cameras. Indeed she was recently quoted in an interview for the online photography magazine, Faded + Blurred, as having said that digital cameras produce images with too much information, that are too sharp, and that you have to spend too much time trying to make them look good. Digital shutters, she has said, have a very slight delay, causing her to miss the shot she has in her head.

In my previous post I wrote about American photographer Ralph Gibson’s photography and described how his pictures appear to exude a close understanding of female sexuality. Von Unwerth’s images are the real deal; the playfulness, the larking around, the intimacy, the very feminine take on erotic fantasy are the result of having a woman, rather than a man, behind the camera. And the the new work doesn’t disappoint; Do Not Disturb! exhibited at London’s prestigious Michael Hoppen Gallery, narrative images shot against the décor of some of the unique and fantastical rooms at the famous Madonna Inn – located mid-way between Los Angeles and San Francisco – is executed in the signature sexy, provocative and imaginative style one expects from the female photographer at the top of my list.

Images from top
Room 77, 2012 © Ellen Von Unwerth
A recent portrait of photographer, Ellen von Unwerth
Room 1002012 © Ellen Von Unwerth
All images (except portrait) from the series Do Not Disturb!

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Photography | Laetitia Casta | Dominique Issermann

Friday, January 6th, 2012

Exhibition | Laetitia Casta par Dominique Issermann
Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris, France
January 17th – March 25th, 2012
Book | Dominique
Issermann Laetitia Casta
Editions Xavier Barral. January 2012

In winter, high up in the Swiss mountains, the great slabs of roof over the spa at Hotel Therme Vals protect it from snow and ice. Come spring the frozen covering melts away to reveal roof sections that are a grassed-over, flower studded alpine meadow. 2009 Pritzker Architecture Prize-winner, Peter Zumthor, incidentally the same architect who built the 2011 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, hortus conclusus (enclosed garden), in London’s Hyde Park, with Piet Oudolph’s lavish garden as it’s centrepiece, chose geology and mountainscape as his role models, designing the massive spa complex in local Valser gneiss stone to look as if it had been there forever. Inside it’s a sanctuary. The building’s precise yet simple composition and use of materials, the treatment of scale and the effect of light in the minimal series of spaces within are designed to emphasise sensory, contemplative and spiritual experience.

Doyene Paris-based photographer, Dominique Issermann, has shot Sonia Rykiel’s publicity campaigns for more than 10 years, lending the images a natural and spontaneous aesthetic quality. She has exhibited widely throughout the world and numerous books have been produced about her work. Haute Couture labels: Christian Dior, Lancôme and Yves Saint Laurent have all found use for her unique skill. On Youtube you can look behind the scenes at Issermann’s recent Chanel No 5 advertising shoot, featuring Audrey Tautou. It’s a difficult task to decide which is the star of her series of rich, black and white, nude images of beautiful model Laetitia Casta, shot over three days at the Hotel Therme Spa that will be on show at Paris’s Maison Européenne de la Photographie from the middle of this month: the model, the photographer or the building.


Images, top, by ©Dominique Issermann. Four images above by Nico Schärer, courtesy Hotel Therme Spa

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