Posts Tagged ‘Germany’

Photography | The High Life & The Horror

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017

Serge Lifar, 1935,
Madame d‘Ora
Gelatin silver print



Madame d’Ora.
Make Me Beautiful!
Museum für Kunst
& Gewerbe Hamburg
Hamburg | Germany
21 December 2017
> 18 March 2018



Separated Calf’s Head,
before 1958, from the
Slaughterhouse series,
Madame d‘Ora
Gelatin silver print



Having your portrait photographed by Madame d’Ora underpinned your claim to a place in the world of the beautiful, the well educated and the famous. But then the world changed. Madame d’Ora (1881 > 1963), who from 1910 had dedicated her work exclusively to Viennese and Parisian fashionable society was Jewish and, as the Germans advanced, was forced to flee the French capital.

Born into a wealthy family – her father was a lawyer at the Viennese palace court – Dora Philippine Kalmus would adopt Madame d’Ora as her professional pseudonym. Having trained as a photographer in Berlin, she established a photography studio with Arthur Benda in Vienna in 1907. The two operated a summer studio from 1921 until 1926 in Karlsbad, Germany, and set up an atelier in Paris in 1925. In the 1920s, she courted the rapidly evolving illustrated press, where her images would appear in upmarket magazines such as Die Dame, Madame, and L’Officiel de la Couture et de la Mode.

Fashion designer
Emilie Flöge
wearing a dress with
Kolo-Moser-Motifs, 1908,
Atelier d’Ora
Gelatin silver print



Woman supporting an
ailing man, 1945/46,
from the Refugees series,
Madame d‘Ora
Gelatin silver print



She photographed fashion for the Wiener Werkstätte, and the long list of those who sat for Madame d’Ora included the clothing designer, businesswoman and lifelong companion of Gustav Klimt, Emilie Flöge. She produced portraits of Coco Chanel, Colette, Russian prima ballerina, Anna Pavlova, and Tamara de Lempicka. Aristocrats like Comtesse Heléne Costa de Beauregard and the modernist patron Marie-Laure de Noailles, Vicomtesse de Noailles, became her clients. However, her camera wasn’t reserved for women; considered the chief architect of modern French ballet, Serge Lifar sat for her, as did Picasso and Maurice Chevalier. In the 1920s Madame d’Ora had photographed flamboyant Jazz-Age entertainer, Josephine Baker, who – by now a French citizen – when war came, joined the Resistance.

Tamara de Lempicka
with a hat by Rose
Descat, 1933,*
Madame d‘Ora
Gelatin silver print



Skinned Rabbit Body,
before 1958, from the
Slaughterhouse series,
Madame d‘Ora
Gelatin silver print



By 1945 d’Ora, incensed and appalled by the cruelty of the Nazis, had adopted a tough-edged, no-frills photographic style that she used to document the fate of refugees in the area around Vienna. Returning to Paris and to the glamorous world of portraiture, her personal artistic response to the horrors of war would nevertheless reach its apotheosis in two haunting photographic series of 1950 and 1958 depicting the bloody, dismembered remains of dead animals in the city’s slaughterhouses.

The exhibition Madame d’Ora. Make Me Beautiful! at the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg (MKG) presents the first-ever survey of d’Ora’s work and features some 250 photographs spanning her career from the 1910s to 1950s.

All photographs courtesy Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg.
All photographs © Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, except (*) from a private collection in Vienna


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Architecture | Brutalism Bites Back

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

Plumbers and Gasfitters
Employees’ Union Building,
Melbourne, Australia, 1968 > 1971.
Architect Graeme Gunn
Photo Graeme Gunn c 1971



SOS Brutalism
Save the Concrete Monsters!
Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM)
Frankfurt am Main | Germany
9 November 2017 > 2 April 2018



Birmingham City Library,
Birmingham, UK, 1969 > 1973,
demolished 2016.
Architect John Madin
Photo Jason Hood 2016



Brutalism has been given a hard time. Over the past thirty years or so many brutalist buildings across the globe have been destroyed. Many more are now at risk. Some of those bent on their demolition see themselves as avenging angels, ridding the world of ugly, unloved monsters that should never have been erected and which the world would be better off without. Often brutalist buildings were commissioned from noteworthy architects by big companies, cities or governments as symbols of success and of civic and national pride; they were constructed on prime sites, the current real estate values of which give pause for thought.

While no-one, in Britain at least, has gone so far as to prostrate themselves before the bulldozers, flying in the face of the destroyers’ views brutalism has reached cult status on Facebook and Instagram. On the British Brutalism Appreciation Society, Facebook page, one of its many members, Rhys Edmonds, a student at The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), expresses his excitement at having the Grade II listed One Kemble Street, built between 1964 and 1968 by Richard Seifert’s architectural company ‘right next to my Uni campus!’

Though it must be said that many were thrown up quickly and have little architectural merit, even some of the more functional buildings were executed with great care. In August this year, Westminster Council approved the demolition of the striking, brutalist Welbeck Street car park – just off Oxford Street  – designed by Michael Blampied and Partners in 1971. ‘While the car park on Welbeck Street stands out nationally as an exemplar of 1960s car parks, it does not meet the very high bar for listing buildings of this date,’ a spokesperson for Historic England said. The planners’ excuse is that removing the building is in line with the move away from the use of cars in central London.

Sainte-Bernadette du
Banlay,
Nevers, France,
1963 > 1966.
Architects Claude Parent
& Paul Virilio

Photo Bruno Bellec 2008



Sacré-Cœur Cathedral,
Algiers, Algeria, 1955 > 1963.
Architects Paul Herbé
& Jean Le Couteur

Photo Cyril Preiss 2005



Holy Trinity Church,
Vienna, Austria, 1971 > 1976.
Architect Fritz Wotruba
Photo Wolfgang Leeb 2011



Meanwhile, the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture held the day event Caring for Brutalism in Durham last month in response to the Secretary of State’s renewed decision not to list the city’s angular, concrete students’ union building. Designed by Architects Co-Partnership, Dunelm House was completed in 1966 under the supervision of internationally renowned engineer Sir Ove Arup – his remarkable oeuvre was celebrated in a major retrospective exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum in 2016 – whose adjacent Kingsgate Bridge opened two years earlier. Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the noted architecture historian, considered the building, ‘Brutalist by tradition but not brutal to the landscape…the elements, though bold, [are] sensitively composed.’

It’s interesting to note that the term brutalism does not originate from the English word ‘brutal’, but rather from ‘béton brut’ – the French term for exposed concrete. However, it was coined in the 1950s by a young generation of architects in Britain who used the expression ‘New Brutalism’ to distance their work from the dreariness of post-war architecture. Architecture critic Reyner Banham described the Hunstanton School by Alison and Peter Smithson (and their unrealised Soho House) as ‘points of architectural reference by which the New Brutalism in architecture may be defined’.

Rozzol Melara, Trieste,
Italy, 1969 > 1982.
Architects IACP
(Carlo Celli & Luciano Celli)

Photo Paolo Mazzo 2010



La Pyramide, Abidjan,
Ivory Coast, 1968 > 1973.
Architect Rinaldo Olivieri



Brutalist architecture celebrates rawness and bare construction, qualities that lend themselves well to photography. #SOSBrutalism is a growing database and interactive site that currently contains images of over 1000 brutalist buildings from all over the world. The passionate conservation group behind it, in whose view brutalist buildings are not always made of concrete, ‘but are all ‘rhetorical’ in that they blatantly place the focus on their material or sculptural form’, have joined forces with the internationally esteemed Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) to present the eponymously-titled SOS Brutalism exhibition. To coincide with the show, this month Park Books publishes SOS Brutalism – A Global Survey, the first ever worldwide survey of brutalist architecture from the 1950s to the 1970s.

All images courtesy the Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM)


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Photography | Albert Renger-Patzsch: Beautiful World

Friday, October 13th, 2017

Kauper, Hochofenwerk,
[Kauper, blast furnaces]
,
Herrenwyk, Lübeck, 1927
Albert Renger-Patzsch Archiv /
Stiftung Ann und Jürgen Wilde,
Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich



Albert Renger-Patzsch
Things
Jeu de Paume
Paris | France
16 October 2017
> 21 January 2018



Hände [Hands], 1926 > 1927
Collection Ann und Jürgen Wilde



Eminent photo-historian, the late Bruce Bernard’s Photodiscovery book (1980) contains useful, sometimes lengthy potted histories of the photographers whose work he decided to include. He was dogged and persistent in his research, so, as the German photographer’s entry is severely limited, it is safe to presume that when Bernard was gathering the material together almost forty years ago, little information was available on Albert Renger-Patzsch (1897 > 1966), whose work is the subject of a forthcoming retrospective at Jeu de Paume. During the intervening years, which have seen a revival of interest in the 1920s German Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity) group that included George Grosz, Otto Dix and Max Beckmann, with which Renger-Patzsch was associated, and fuelled by the popularity of the work of later and contemporary photographers such as Bernd and Hilla Becher, Martin Parr and William Eggleston – who it might be said followed in the same tradition – knowledge about him has grown and examples of his oeuvre have become more accessible.

Natterkopf [Snake's head], 1925
Berinson Gallery, Berlin



Landstraße bei Essen
[Country road
near Essen], 1929
Albert Renger-Patzsch Archiv /
Stiftung Ann und Jürgen Wilde,
Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich



Renger-Patzsch took his first photographs, aged twelve, in Würzberg, Bavaria. His first job was as a chemist, then he did a stint as a photography archivist before becoming a freelance documentary and press photographer in 1925. As with the somewhat older German photographer, Karl Blossfeldt (1865 > 1932), whose work would not achieve public attention until 1928 when his book Urformen der Kunst [Art Forms in Nature] was published, Renger-Patzsch’s scientific background exerted a strong influence on his photography. In his own very influential book Die Welt ist schön [The World is Beautiful], which appeared that same year, Renger-Patzsch displayed images from both nature and industry; all shot in a clear, uncluttered style closely related to the detached and literal renderings of reality espoused by the Neue Sachlichkeit painters, whose approach reflected the resignation and cynicism of the post-World War I period in Germany.

Stapelia variegata,
Asclepiadaceae, 1923
Albert Renger-Patzsch Archiv /
Stiftung Ann und Jürgen Wilde,
Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich



Jenaer Glas (Zylindrische
Gläser) [Jena Glassworks
(Cylindrical beakers)], 1934
Museum Folkwang, Essen



The development of the photographic process itself had been the result of in-depth scientific research. Some 19th century artists would take advantage of the medium’s capacity to record details that they could employ as reference for their paintings, and a few photographers would use it for its documentary potential, but it was generally viewed as a method of creating images that resembled paintings and executed in a style that intentionally distanced it from reality and was referred to as pictorialism. In his strong belief that his subjects did not require any enhancement Renger-Patzsch rejected pictorialism and forgoing painterly techniques, such as soft focus, recorded the exact, detailed appearance of his subjects, in an attempt to discover beauty in everyday things and places, in the ordinary and the mundane. Some of his contemporaries who were working in similar areas at the time and whose approach, like Renger-Patzch’s eschewed the emotional and the spiritual in favour of the rational and sometimes political, and whose photography was a response to the rapid industrialisation of Europe and America, included Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, August Sander and Edward Weston.

From the early 1930s Renger-Patzsch taught photography, and afterwards, while working as a freelance photographer, focused on personal projects. As with his early work, his later subjects were natural and industrial: Eisen und Stahl [Iron and Steel], 1930, Bäume [Trees], 1962), and Gestein [Stones], 1966.

Albert Renger-Patzsch: Things, at Jeu de Paume, including over 150 prints, is an overview of the themes and directions, which marked the photographers’ career.

All images by Albert Renger-Patzsch, courtesy Jeu de Paume
© Albert Renger-Patzsch / Archiv Ann und Jürgen Wilde, Zülpich / ADAGP, Paris 2017


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Art | Deconstructing the Diorama

Friday, September 29th, 2017

Richard Barnes,
Man with Buffalo, 2007
Inkjet print
137.2 x 167.7cm
© Richard Barnes



Diorama
Inventing Illusion
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
6 October > 21 January 2018



Hiroshi Sugimoto,
Earliest Human Relatives, 1994
Silver gelatin print
42.3 × 54.3 cm
© The artist
Courtesy Sugimoto Studio



Contemporary artists such as Jeff Wall, Isa Genzken, and Hiroshi Sugimoto have dusted off the long redundant diorama format and updated it. Examples of their visions of how aspects of our culture can be re-staged via the revived medium, have been gathered together with that of many others, for new major exhibition in Germany highlighting the stories behind the development of this form of presentation, alongside a chronology of events that took place in parallel to it.

Mark Dion,
Paris Streetscape, 2017
Diverse materials
180 x 250 x150 cm
Courtesy Mark Dion /
Galerie in Situ
– Fabienne Leclerc, Paris.
Photo Aurélien Mole



Redolent of museum visits on rainy Sundays in our youth, their subject matter often anthropological, dioramas were intended to transport us to another time and place. The time was often hundreds, thousands or even millions of years ago; the place was conjured up in painted papier-mâché and invisibly joined to a painted backdrop. While it sometimes references the past, and employs many of the established techniques – albeit with a technological twist – the new work is imbued with irony and even humour, and the main emphasis is on the here and now.

Jean Paul Favand,
Naguère Daguerre 1, 2012
Digital light installation
with 19th Century canvas
270 x 410 cm
Musée des Arts Forains
© Jean Paul Favand
Photo Jean Mulatier



The museum scenes were invariably miniaturised and usually viewed through a peephole: turning the scale on its head, Jeff Wall places a giant-sized ageing, nude, female figure in a labyrinthine modern museum interior. In Richard BarnesMan with Buffalo, a curious buffalo approaches the set-builder. For his life-sized Paris Streetscape, Mark Dion adopts a deconstructed approach, cramming the diverse elements inside an internally illuminated glass-fronted box set on wheels.

Jeff Wall, The Giant, 1992
Lightbox with transparent
photography
39 x 48 x 13 cm,
Private collection
© Jeff Wall



Jean Paul Favand’s Naguère Daguerre (2012), which relies on two restored canvases from a nineteenth-century mechanical theatre references Louis Daguerre – inventor of the daguerreotype photographic process in the 1830s, and one of the fathers of photography – who was involved, in the early 1820s, in developing the first diorama theatre as a walk-in, optical-mechanical playhouse in Paris.

Diorama Inventing Illusion at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is the first comprehensive examination of the diorama.

All images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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Exhibition | 1937: Munich’s Degenerate Summer

Friday, July 21st, 2017

Exhibition view,
Entartete Kunst,
Munich, 1937

Stadtarchiv München



Munich, Summer 1937.
The ‘Great German Art Exhibition’
and ‘Degenerate Art’
Haus der Kunst
Munich | Germany
Until 4 September 2017



Exhibition view,
Große Deutsche
Kunstausstellung,
Munich, 1937
Stadtarchiv München



In the summer of 1937, when the Haus der Deutschen Kunst (The House of German Art), opened in Munich – Adolph Hitler’s chosen capital of German culture – over 735,000 sightseers came to the city. As the first representative monumental building of the ‘Third Reich’, the building was intended to play a central role in the Führer’s political vision. Aware of the importance of making big statements to maximise impact, Hitler chose Paul Ludwig Troost, who specialised in building ocean liners, to design it. Impressed, lulled into false calm by Nazi propaganda – the extreme political aggression and murderous racism of the regime having not yet manifested itself – visitors also flocked to see, and to have themselves photographed, alongside other architectural projects such the classical Königsplatz, which Troost had redeveloped as a National Socialist parade ground.

Its name simplified, the Haus der Kunst – which for ten years after the war ended was commandeered for use as a US Army casino, and afterwards played host to a motley array of exhibitions – re-opened in 1990 as a museum of modern art. With no permanent collection of its own, it has been a leading international centre devoted to diversity in contemporary art since 2003.

Mel Bochner’s
The Joys of Yiddish,
Haus der Kunst, 2013,
installation view
Photo Wilfried Petzi



Exhibition view,
Große Deutsche
Kunstausstellung
,
Munich, 1937

Stadtarchiv München



In stark contrast, Entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art) – the museum’s inaugural exhibition – was part of a propagandist stunt carefully orchestrated by Joseph Goebbels. Consisting of seized modernist works from the collections of 32 German museums, and literally thrown together in such a way as to make the art look worthless, it opened the day before another well-planned and carefully laid out exhibition, the Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellung (The Great German Art Exhibition) was launched at the adjacent, historic Hofgarten Gallery.

The idea of staging the Entartete Kunst exhibition in this way was not just to mock modern art, but also to encourage the public to view it as part of an evil plot against the German people. Although only six of the 112 artists featured in it were Jewish, the Nazis claimed that modern art was the product of Jews and Bolsheviks. One display of entirely abstract paintings, was labelled ‘the insanity room’. While Entartete Kunst included works by internationally recognised painters, such as Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Oskar Kokoschka, alongside others by famous German artists of the time such as Max Beckmann, and the expressionists, Emil Nolde and Georg Grosz, the Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellung showed regime-approved paintings and sculptures of statuesque nudes, idealised soldiers and romantic landscapes.

Legalising the previous year’s seizures – each having been alphabetically indexed by the Propaganda Ministry – the Law on Confiscation of Products of Degenerate Art would be passed in 1938. Some of the expropriated works were sold at auction in Switzerland; others were disposed of through private dealers, while around 5,000 items were secretly burned in Berlin the following year: a phenomenal loss to 20th century art.

Ironically, while many of the amateur snaps and films included in this archive-based exhibition at the Haus der Kunst would have today’s visitor believe it was a season of idyllic pleasures, Munich, Summer 1937 documents a nightmarish, cultural disaster.

All images courtesy Haus der Kunst


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Photography | Regina Schmeken on Bloody Ground

Friday, July 7th, 2017

Theodoros Boulgarides (41)
15.06.2005 München Trappentreustraße
, 2013



Regina Schmeken
Bloody Ground. Scenes of NSU Crimes
Martin-Gropius-Bau
Berlin | Germany
29 July > 29 October 2017



Halit Yozgat (21)
06.04.2006 Kassel Holländische Straße
, 2015



Enver Şimşek (38)
09.09.2000 Nürnberg
, 2015



Much of the work of conveying the oppressive atmosphere of a Nazi arena is done for photographers by the overblown architecture that stands as a stark reminder of the misplaced ideals of the sinister powers responsible for their construction. The barbed wire and lookout towers of death camps, such as Buchenwald, prompt vivid recollections of the atrocities perpetrated there. An old man in a flat cap sitting at a bus stop in an ordinary street lined with apartment buildings; a couple on a scooter riding past a forlorn flower stall beside a rainwater puddle; the chequered, tiled floor of a bike shop – were not much for German photographer Regina Schmeken to go on.

The dead bodies and the blood were long gone, however, in 2013 when Schmeken returned to the crime scenes where ten people were executed by right-wing National Socialist Underground extremists in Dortmund, Hamburg, Heilbronn, Kassel, Cologne, Munich, Nuremberg and Rostock between 2000 and 2007. Schmeken worked with what she found. Other than choosing to shoot in contrasty black and white – which she always does, anyway – and using a wide-angle lens, she employed no special tricks to successfully evoke the carnage that had taken place in these very nondescript locations.

Mehmet Turgut (25)
25.02.2004 Rostock Neudierkower Weg
, 2013



Süleyman Taşköprü (31)
27.06.2001 Hamburg Schützenstraße
, 2015




Born in 1955, Schmeken has been an editorial photographer for the Süddeutsche Zeitung newspaper since 1986 and is well known in Germany for her sport, dance, political reportage, and portrait photography.

Through her photographs – simply captioned with only the names of the dead, their ages, the dates and locations of the crimes – in the exhibition Regina Schmeken: Bloody Ground. Scenes of NSU Crimes at Martin-Gropius-Bau, the photographer seeks only to commemorate the victims of the murders, but the underlying message powerfully conveyed is that these abhorrent events could have happened on any German doorstep.

The dead numbered eight male victims of Turkish origin, another was Greek and one was a German policewoman. The trial of Beate Zschäpe, Ralf Wohlleben and the five others allegedly involved in their murders began in 2013 in Munich; the verdict is yet to be delivered.

All photographs © Regina Schmeken, courtesy Martin-Gropius-Bau


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Design | A Tribute to Willy Fleckhaus

Friday, May 19th, 2017

twen, No 2, 1962, cover.
Art direction Willy Fleckhaus
Photography Christa Peters
© MAKK



Willy Fleckhaus.
Design, Revolt, Rainbow
Museum Villa Stuck
Munich | Germany
1 June > 10 September 2017



Frankfurter Allgemeine Magazin,
No 28, 1980, cover.
Art direction Willy Fleckhaus
Photographer unknown
© Hans Döring


Edition Suhrkamp,
Suhrkamp Verlag
Book series, 1963.
Design Willy Fleckhaus
© Carsten Wolff,
Fine German Design,
Frankfurt am Main

xxx



David Hillman: ‘In terms of design, twen was the most admired magazine of the sixties… [Fleckaus’s] utterly uncompromising attitude allowed his outrageous and defiant vision to be translated on to the page… No art director has had such power before or since.’

Willy Fleckhaus was born in 1925, and died in 1983. Willy Fleckhaus. Design, Revolt, Rainbow, at Museum Villa Stuck includes over 350 examples of work spanning his entire career in design, magazines and book publishing.

All images courtesy Museum Villa Stuck


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Photography | Juergen Teller: a Kind of Self-portrait

Friday, April 21st, 2017

Kanye, Juergen & Kim, No. 51
Chateau d’Ambleville 2015



Juergen Teller.
Enjoy Your Life!
Martin-Gropius-Bau
Berlin | Germany
Until 3 July 2017



Anne & Elisa, No. 1
Man About Town

Magazine cover,
spring/summer 2016



Kanye, Juergen & Kim, No. 70
Chateau d’Ambleville 2015



‘I hate nothing more than sugary photographs with tricks, poses and effects. So allow me to be honest and tell the truth about our age and its people.’ August Sander (1876 > 1964)

Juergen Teller was born in Germany, in the year that the great German portrait and documentary photographer August Sander died. Like Sander, he doesn’t idealise, and makes no effort to romanticise or prettify his subjects. His sincerity is infectious and the honesty of his approach to his work is inspiring. Nevertheless he likes to have fun, too. ‘What Helmut says goes, what Rei says goes, what Vivienne says goes, what Marc says goes… I take the whole thing seriously, but I couldn’t do a job where I didn’t have any fun, and just to make money,’ he told the Independent newspaper.

Photographing the actress Charlotte Rampling for Marc Jacobs’ 2004 advertising campaign, and including himself in some of the intimate shots – one showed Teller curling up in bed with Rampling, him sucking her toes – was the start of a close working relationship that led to their collaboration on a provocative series of images, involving his own nudity, that would become a book and an exhibition. In 2009, Teller was involved with Vivienne Westwood and Pamela Anderson for an ‘Everything ugly and beautiful at the same time’ campaign that also resulted in a book. Westwood, with whom he continued to work, would also appear, draped over a car on a dirt road, in Teller’s monograph, Keys To The House (2012). ‘In the wider sense, everything is a kind of self-portrait. It’s just the way you see things and how certain things rouse your curiosity and get you all excited,’ he has said. Kanye, Juergen & Kim, a later book published in 2015, contains a series he shot with Kanye West and his wife Kim Kardashian at Château d’Ambleville in France, but no château. Instead he chose to make the most of this rare opportunity alone with them away from the public gaze by capturing the couple – and himself – in seemingly private, intimate moments, out in the open countryside.

Love, Bataclan
Memorial

Paris 2016



My mother,
Plates/Teller, No. 174

2016



Having studied photography in Munich, and speaking no English, Teller had moved to London in 1986 and managed to find work shooting record covers. He photographed Sinéad O’Connor in 1990 then went on tour with Nirvana the following year. His image of Kate Moss for a British Vogue cover in 1994 launched his career as a fashion photographer and by 1996 his success earned him a solo exhibition at London’s Photographers’ Gallery, followed by work for Calvin, and later, Céline and Yves Saint Laurent. He had been involved in advertising campaigns for Marc Jacobs since 1998, his work becoming synonymous with the brand, and the subject of another book Marc Jacobs Advertising 1998 – 2009. His photography has featured in an array of influential international publications such including W Magazine and i-D.

Self-portrait
London 2015



Teller is one of a few artists since Robert Mapplethorpe – an exhibition of whose work he was recently invited to curate at Alison Jacques’ gallery in London – who has been able to straddle both the art world and that of commercial fashion photography.​ Woo, a retrospective of work, opened at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts in 2013 and was the most well attended exhibition in the venue’s history. In 2014, his exhibition MACHO was staged at DESTE Foundation in Athens. His previous exhibitions include Man with Banana (2011), at Dallas Contemporary, Texas, and The Girl With the Broken Nose (2012) at the Palazzo Reale in Milan. His work is included in numerous collections around the world, including the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, International Center for Photography, New York, and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

There are some tricks, there are some poses, but his photography is never sugary, indeed his more personal work can have a very serious, poignant edge to it. What Teller sees and is interested in is essentially, what you get. His unique vision has led to him becoming regarded by many as one of the world’s great contemporary photographers.

Juergen Teller. Enjoy Your Life! was shown previously at the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn and the Galerie Rudolfinum in Prague. It’s now a must see at Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin.

All images © Juergen Teller, courtesy Bundeskunsthalle


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Art | Drawing: a Place in Space

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Hermann Glöckner,
From the series: 3 Phases, 1980
Foldings, tempera on cardboard,
Deutsche Bank Collection
at
the Städel Museum,
Frankfurt am Main
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017



Into the Third Dimension:
Spatial Concepts on Paper from
the Bauhaus to the Present
Städel Museum
Frankfurt am Main | Germany
15 February > 14 May 2017



Globalisation has created a situation where, too often, the larger galleries and museums around the world choose to gather material from a wide variety of collections and private sources, which combine to produce blockbuster exhibitions that might have the advantage of being comprehensive, but lack any sense of place. This one is different.

Despite the work included having been produced by an international array of artists 13 artists, among them Argentine-born Lucio Fontana (founder, in Italy, in 1947 of the Spatialism (Spazialismo) movement), Spanish sculptor Eduardo Chillida, and the American artists, Sol LeWitt, who produced countless spatialist works in the latter decades of the 20th century and on into the 21st, and James Turrell, who, during the same period used projected light to create illusionary geometric bodies, the vast majority of it is drawn from the Museum’s own extensive holdings, which gives the show a strong local flavour.

El Lissitzky
Proun. Kestner Portfolio 1
(sheet IV), 1923
Lithograph
Städel Museum,
Frankfurt am Main



Sol LeWitt
Distorted Cubes (B), 2001
Lino cut
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017



Eduardo Chillida
Yunque de sueños VII
(Anvil of Dreams VII),
1954 > 1959

Iron and wood,
Städel Museum,
Frankfurt am Main
© Zabalaga-Leku /
VG Bild-Kunst,
Bonn 2017



It had been the cubists, in Paris in the early 1900s, sticking pieces of newspaper, wallpaper, tickets and packaging on to the paper or canvas surfaces on which they were working, who pioneered the spatial concept, but they soon moved on to pursue other interests. El Lissitsky, a Russian, and Hungarian Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, however, while both based in Germany during the 1920s, experimented extensively with spatial ideas, producing work that would have enormous, international impact. Important examples of these from the Städel’s permanent collection including Lissitsky’s Proun (1923) portfolio of graphic works, and Moholy-Nagy’s Constellations (1923) portfolio of prints, are used as an introduction to the exhibition.

László Moholy-Nagy
Construction, 1924
Oil on canvas
Permanent loan of
Commerzbank AG,
Frankfurt am Main



The Museum is also displaying a selection of works by important German spatial art masters, Hermann Glöckner (1889-1987) and Norbert Kricke (1922–1984), who were both strongly influenced by constructivism. Glöckner, was one of former East Germany’s leading abstract artists, who, from 1935 started to create collage-like, folded pieces that tested the notion of a shallow pictorial solid and foreshadowed 1960s minimalism, while in post-war Düsseldorf, Kricke began producing sculptures made from welded together metal rods that reached out dynamically into space.

The Third Dimension: Spatial Concepts on Paper from the Bauhaus to the Present at the Städel Museum might be dominated by works on paper, but, of course, due to the nature of its subject, also features sculpture and even some paintings on canvas.

All photos Städel Museum – Artothek, Frankfurt am Main, courtesy Städel Museum


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Design | 100 Best German-Speaking Posters

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

Striped Hills
Designed by Timo Lenzen, Germany
For Durex China, Shanghai
(via S-LAB, Beijing/Shanghai).
Digital print
© Timo Lenzen/100 Beste Plakate eV



100 Best Posters 15
Germany Austria Switzerland /
100 Beste Plakate 15
Deutschland Österreich Schweiz
MAK
Vienna | Austria
28 September 2016 > 5 February 2017



Hello Hello
Designed by Yvo Hählen
+ Priscilla Balmer, A3 studio, Switzerland

Commissioned by the artists.
Digital print
© A3 studio/100 Beste Plakate eV



More than 2000 were entered by 125 agencies and graphic design studios, 465 individual designers and 15 clients, and 964 posters made it through to the final round of the Vienna-based competition. In the true spirit of fairness which the organisers pride themselves upon, only two posters from Austria itself will appear in the 100-strong exhibition, along with 50 by Swiss designers and 48 from Germany.

Was glaubst du, wer du bist? /
Who do you think you are?
Designed by Günter Karl Bose
+ Uwe Langner,
LMN-Berlin, Germany
For Theater Bonn.
Digital print
© LMN-Berlin/100 Beste Plakate eV



Zwickl – Schwandorfer Dokumentarfilmtage 2015 /
Zwickl – Schwandorf documentary film days 2015
Designed by Oliver Hofmann + Benjamin Buchegger
+ Daniel Car, Beton – Gruppe für Gestaltung, Austria
For City of Schwandorf, Anne Schleicher.
Offset print
© Beton – Gruppe für Gestaltung/100 Beste Plakate eV



The most popular graphic design competition in the German-speaking world, the formidable jury consisting of chairman Gunter Rambow (Germany) , Günter Eder (Vienna) and Megi Zumstein (Lucerne), is augmented by Barcelona and Berlin-based, British designer Patrick Thomas, and Latvian-born, Igor Gurovich, graphic designer and tutor at the National Design Institute (Moscow).

Design x Taipei
Designed Jianping He, Hesign, Germany
For Taiwan Poster Association, Taipei.
Silk-screen print
© Hesign/100 Beste Plakate eV



Howlong Wolf
Design Isabelle Mauchle, Switzerland
For Neubad, Lucerne.
Digital print
© Isabelle Mauchle/100 Beste Plakate eV



According to Rambow, who has been designing since 1960, is a former professor of graphic design at the University of Kassel and of Visual Communication at the Staatliche Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe, and who regularly designs the posters for the Frankfurt Opera, the poster scene is on the move. New tendencies from youth culture are becoming visible, he says, and many graffiti sprayers have become designers. However, ‘Although they have always had intense competition, posters as images in public space will maintain their significance,’ he reassures us.

A catalogue for the MAK exhibition 100 Best Posters 15. Germany Austria Switzerland / 100 Beste Plakate 15. Deutschland Österreich Schweiz (Atlas 15), by Anita Kühnel will be available at the MAK Design Shop.

All images courtesy MAK


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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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