Posts Tagged ‘Imogen Cunningham’

Photography | Edward Weston: The Master Set

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Sotheby’s
Photographs
Exhibition 26th > 29th September 2014
Auction 30th September 2014
New York City | USA

What an exciting day it will be for photography buffs, fans and collectors next Tuesday at Sotheby’s, New York. The morning auction session starts at 10 am with lots 1 > 107, and resumes at 2pm, when lots 109 > 236 will go under the hammer. What about the missing lot 108, you may ask?

These two sessions include work by many masters of the medium, and will be especially strong in 20th Century modernist images. Alexander Rodchenko’s Steps (1929), and Imogen Cunningham’s Amphitheatre (Mills College) (c1928), along with Lewis Hine’s Mechanic at Steam Pump in Electric Power House (1925), together with examples of Ansel Adams, El Lissitzky, and Edward Steichen’s work, and that of many other important photographers, are on view during the pre-auction exhibition beginning today. But these sessions shrink to mere sideshows when compared to the extraordinary sale of lot 108, which falls between them, and must represent the most fabulous single lot in a photography auction, ever.

Lot 108 consists of a job lot of 548 photographs, many of them rare and unseen, by the great American photographer Edward Weston (1886 > 1958), printed by his son Cole Weston mostly between 1958 and 1988, and is likely to become legendary. Mounted, 536 stamped and signed by Cole Weston, 12 with the Cole Weston Trust stamp, signed by (Edward’s granddaughter) Cara Weston, and nearly all with title, date, and negative number, spanning the entire range of the photographer’s career, and called The Master Set, they are expected to sell for an estimated $2,000,000 > 3,000,000 (£1,220,500 > 1,830,700).

Please accept our apologies for the lack of individual details for each image; on this occasion, Sotheby’s was unable to grant our request to provide any.

Edward Weston Photographs courtesy Sotheby’s, New York


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Sculpture | Ruth Asawa: Line as Form

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

Ruth Asawa: Objects & Apparitions
Christie’s Private Sales
Rockefeller Center
New York City, USA
Exhibition 6th -31st May, 2013

Associated with the formulation of modernism, the concept of line as form is an ineffable paradox that was first explored at the Bauhaus in the 1920s and early 30s. Unlikely then, in 1947, for high-school graduate Ruth Asawa, to stumble upon a language that expressed the complex notion in the looped-wire baskets used for selling eggs in Mexico’s markets. But the promising and curious student, born in 1926 of Japanese immigrant parents, who had grown up during The Great Depression and began studying drawing and painting with professional Japanese artists in the internment camps, where she and her family were confined during World War II, had already travelled to Mexico two years earlier to study Spanish and Mexican Art, and by the time her return visit came around had come under the influence of former Bauhaus master Josef Albers and architect Buckminster Fuller, both teachers at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, where she had enrolled. ‘The artist must discover the uniqueness and integrity of the material’, Albers had explained, and intrigued with the idea of experimenting with wire as a medium, Asawa began to loop and twist it in a similar fashion to the Mexican basket makers, producing 3D forms – essentially, drawings in space – made from a single continuous wire. ‘I was interested in wire sculpture because of the economy of a line,’ Asawa said, ‘making something in space, enclosing it without blocking it out. It’s still transparent.’ Many of these sculptures were designed to be hung from the ceiling, and later Asawa hit upon the idea of creating transparent forms within the transparent forms, increasing the complexity and playfulness of her creations.

It wasn’t until 1953 that Asawa began exhibiting her work – in the meantime having been married and given birth to two of the six children she would have by 1959 – in solo and group shows at the San Francisco Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of Modern Art and at The Museum of Modern Art in New York. By this time she had met and formed a life-long friendship with legendary photographer Imogen Cunningham (1883 -1976). Cunningham, famed for her images of flowers, nudes and industrial landscapes, sensitively captured the sublime lightness and fluidity of Asawa’s work in still life compositions. She produced many pictures of the artist working, as well portraits in which Asawa becomes an element inextricably enmeshed with the sculptural forms of her creations.

In the 1960s, Asawa received major commissions to make public art and in 1970, her work was exhibited in the American Pavilion at the Osaka World’s Fair. So well-established as an artist was she by the early 70s that her sculpture and paintings began being shown in a string of retrospectives at important US venues – San Francisco Museum of Art (1973), Fresno Art Center (1978 and 2001). Asawa is reprented by the Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco. Virtually unknown in Europe, in New York, her work can be found in major collections including that of the Solomon R Guggenheim and Whitney Museum of American Art; Objects & Apparations is her first major solo show in the city in over 50 years. Forty-eight works, including sculpture and works on paper – for sale or for private loan – will be presented in a show that takes place in the elevated setting of the 20th floor of 1230 Avenue of the Americas, at Rockefeller Center. Christie’s will offer the sculpture Untitled, above, from the Ruth Asawa Family Collection at their May 15th Post-War and Contemporary Art evening sale.

Imogen Cunningham photographs from top
Ruth Asawa, Sculptor, 1956
(Ruth Holding a Form-Within-Form, 1952)

Untitled
Hanging, six-lobed, multi-layered continuous form within a form
Estimate $250-350,000 (£160-225,000)

Ruth Asawa 2, 1957

All photos: archive pictures ©Imogen Cunningham
Courtesy Christie’s New York

Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, gardens, books, design and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Photography | Margaret Bourke-White in Berlin

Friday, January 18th, 2013

Margaret Bourke-White: Photographs 1930 – 1945
Martin Gropius Bau
Berlin, Germany
18th January – 14th April, 2013

The cover photo of the first ever issue of Life magazine (November, 1936) was by Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971). In the 1920s, like other women photographers, writers, artists and editors who broke into the male-dominated professional world, lighting the way for women’s liberation – Lee Miller, Gertrude Stein, Dorothea Lange, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Imogen Cunningham, among others – Bourke-White had been ahead of her time.

She wanted to be the ‘eyes of the age’, and had ‘an unquenchable desire to be present when history is being made’, as she put it. She had the knack of being in the right place at the right time and, aggressive and relentless in her pursuit of pictures, she was prepared to go far further than most to achieve her goal.

One of the first photojournalists, her career began in 1927 in Cleveland, USA, where she photographed the city’s steel mills. She travelled to the USSR when the first five-year plan was being implemented – becoming the first Western photographer to document post-revolution Soviet industry. Bourke-White documented the drought of 1934 in the USA, the German invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, and the Allied bombing of Germany – she became the first woman to go on a bombing mission, in 1943, at a time when women were not allowed in combat zones, gaining herself international celebrity status. Present at the liberation of the Buchenwald concentration camp and the Leipzig-Mockau forced labour camp, her photograph The Living Dead of Buchenwald went round the world. Soon after she was in India recording the release of Mahatma Ghandi from prison, in 1946, and then in South Africa documenting the effects of labour exploitation during the 1950s.

The focus of the Martin Gropius Bau Margaret Bourke-White: Photographs 1930 – 1945 exhibition is on the pictures the photographer took in the 1930s and 40s in the former Soviet Union, former Czechoslovakia, Germany, the UK and Italy and consists of 154 photographs, letters and periodicals. Some of her word-picture sequences for the photo magazines Fortune and Life are on view as well as extracts from her correspondence with the likes of Winston Churchill and Georgia O’Keeffe.

Images from top
Russian worker on the turbine shell of the Dnejprostroj-hydro-electric power plant Soviet Union, Saporishya (today, Ukraine), ca 1930
Masters by Getty Images
©Time & Life/Getty Images

The Reverend Spiegelhoff from Milwaukee and American GIs at the mass in the Cologne cathedral, April 1945
Syracuse University Library Collection, New York
©Time & Life/Getty Images

Russian film director Sergej Eisenstein being shaved on the terrace of Bourke-White’s studio in the Chysler Building, NYC, 1932
Syracuse University Library Collection, New York
©2012 Estate of Margaret Bourke-White/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, USA

Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, gardens, books, design and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Photography | Camera Works

Friday, September 30th, 2011

Photographs
Sotheby’s New York, USA. Sale October 5th, 2011
Exhibition opens 30th September

Maybe you can’t afford to buy but if you are interested in 19th, 20th and 21st century collectable photography, many of the biggest names are here and Sotheby’s exhibitions are open to the public. Let’s start with fashion – Avedon, Horst, Penn. Peter Beard is also represented by his enormous and beautiful illustrated work: Maureen Gallagher and Late-Night Feeder (see below). A rare print of Diane Arbus’s disturbing portrait Viva is going under the hammer. Ansel Adams prints for sale include, among others: Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico, and a mural of Leaves, Mt. Rainier National Park. There are works by Edward Weston, Paul Strand, Edward Outerbridge and Imogen Cunningham. Prints of two well-known images – Spectacles and The First Round (see above) – by French modernist Pierre Dubreuil are also in the auction. From earlier times there’s a massive print of Alexander Gardner’s portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In addition to the prints, a complete collection of Alfred Stieglitz’s famed quarterly, Camera Work, is up for sale.

Top. Lot 110 Estimate $150/250,000
Pierre Dubreuil The First Round. Circa 1932

Above. Lot 170 Estimate $120/180,000
Peter Beard Maureen Gallagher and Late-Night Feeder, 2:00am. 1987

Please leave a comment
Look out for The Blog’s posts on art, architecture, gardens, books, design
and anything else that interests me and I think might interest you

Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin