Posts Tagged ‘London’

Design | The Art of the Useful

Friday, April 13th, 2018

Johanna Grawunder
Specchio d’Italia, from
the Street Glow series, 2005
Acrylic, mirrored glass,
fluorescent lighting.
Produced for Galerie Italienne
.
Estimate £5,000 > 7,000



Important Design
Phillips
London | UK
Public viewing 19 > 26 April 2018
Sale 26 April 2018



Since the early decades of the 20th century when design, as we currently understand it, was ‘invented’, functionality – at least in theory – has been its defining feature. Ettore Sottsass’s Nefertiti writing desk, below, might appear to be more suited to a gallery space than to one that people inhabit but it was designed to be used. And if at first glance, many of the other items in this ‘Design’ sale can be mistaken for works of art, they are all also, notionally, functional. (In saying that, it’s difficult to imagine what objects such as Shiro Kuramata’s Hammer House hammers, see final image, below, could purposefully be used for).

Sottsass is only one of the many Italians, whose work dominates this sale, which also includes a large number of items by French creators, as well as others from a broad gamut of international names. Like Sottsass, while few of them are artists, per se, many of them, such as American, Johanna Grawunder, whose Specchio d’Italia fluorescent light (above) shines like a beacon celebrating the spirit of the event, have produced work across several disciplines. Based in Milan, Italy and San Francisco, Grawunder’s practice extends from large-scale public installations, across architecture and interiors, to limited edition furniture and the lighting for which she is particularly well-known.

Gio Ponti
Two hand mirrors,
designed 1932, executed 1960s

Mirrored glass, coloured glass.
Produced by Fontana Arte.
Estimate £3,000 > 5,000



Jean Royère
low table c 1955

Indian rosewood-
veneered wood.
Estimate £30,000 > 50,000



László Moholy-Nagy
Prototype desk set, 1946
Pen rest and letter holder,
chromium-plated brass, brass.
Parker 51 pen designed by
Kenneth Parker and Marlin
Baker, 1938.
Estimate £60,000 > 80,000



Bauhaus master and polymath, László Moholy-Nagy, is perhaps best-known for his ground-breaking experiments in art and photography but, vehemently opposed to creative limitations of any kind, in 1946 he designed a prototype for the pen rest and holder shown above.

Throughout his long career, unwilling to be tied to a single discipline, at various times, and often concurrently, Gio Ponti was an architect, ceramicist, interior designer, furniture designer and magazine editor. The two minimal, glass hand mirror designs he created in the 1930s, being sold here as a single lot, above, had not dated by 1963 when they were finally put into production.

Ettore Sottsass Jr
Nefertiti writing desk, 1968 > 1969

Plastic-laminated wood, steel.
Manufactured by Poltronova.

Estimate £40,000 > 60,000



Shiro Kuramata
Pair of Hammer House hammers
designed c 1985

Steel, painted steel, painted wood.
Manufactured by WEST.
Property from the Soseikan House,
Takarazuka, Hyogo, Japan.
Estimate: £2,000 > 3,000



With a total of 171 lots, Important Design at Phillips, also includes items designed by revered creators such as Harry Bertoia, Gabriella Crespi, Pietro Chiesa, Jean-Michel Frank, Shiro Kuramata, François-Xavier Lalanne, George Nakashima, Ico Parisi, Jean Prouvé, Jean Royère, Gino Sarfatti, Carlo Scarpa and Line Vautrin among a host of others.

Images courtesy Phillips


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design, gardens and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Art | Richard Platt’s Ordinary Extraordinary Prints

Friday, December 29th, 2017

Washing Fish
Lithograph



Richard Platt
Works on Paper Fair
Royal Geographical Society
London | UK
1 > 4 February 2018



The Octopus
(Fairground)

Lithograph



Richard Platt would be pleased. The forthcoming selling exhibition of his lithographs will help further his dream of helping raise Falmouth School of Art, where he taught from the early 1960s, to national status. Having lain undisturbed at his Cornish home for many decades, these extraordinary prints were produced in the mid-1950s when a furious battle between realism and abstraction in British art was raging and barriers separating high and low culture were being torn apart.

In the early 1920s his father, J G Platt – from Lancashire – had attended the Royal College of Art, studying alongside Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth. Evidently better off than his fellow RCA students, when Richard was also accepted at the College in the early 50s, he bought works from his peers, including Peter Blake, Joe Tilson, and John Bratby – who was best man at his first wedding. According to his second wife, the artist Diane Ibbotson, in one timely transaction, when Platt was keen to acquire a colourful picture from Peter Blake that, at £15, he couldn’t afford, he settled for the monochrome Three Young Bathers – which Blake was about to discard – for £5.

Boiling Crabs
Lithograph



Pearly King
and Queen for
the Coronation

Lithograph



George & Vulture
Chop House

Lithograph



Meanwhile, Platt used his own adept pen and ink drawing skills to create compositions based on commonplace situations involving ordinary people at work or leisure that he transposed into strikingly original colour lithographs and paintings. When he left college he was commissioned to paint a mural of a livestock market on the canteen wall of the Working Men’s College, Camden. From 1949 to 58, he exhibited at the Royal Academy, and between 1950 and 1959 at the New English Art Club. His work was shown with The London Group and at The Wilton Gallery. He also had a one-man show at The Leicester Galleries in 1956. Throughout this period, Platt lived in north London (Highgate, then Hampstead) and often found his subjects in the city or on England’s east coast.

Richard Platt (1928 > 2013), became an etcher, woodcutter and engraver and was the principal of Hornsey School of Art before leaving London for Cornwall in 1965. From the late 40s through to the early 60s his approach developed from social realism in the direction of abstraction. His work is held in important public collections, including the Government Art Collection, The British Council, the Victoria & Albert Museum, and Bradford Museums & Galleries.

Richard Platt’s lithographs will be shown by Emma Mason Prints at next month’s Works on Paper Fair at The Royal Geographical Society.

All prints by Richard Platt (1928 – 2013), courtesy Works on Paper Fair, to be exhibited by Emma Mason Prints


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design, gardens and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Exhibition | Hella Jongerius: Lost in Colour

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Hella Jongerius prepares
for Breathing Colour
at the Jongeriuslab



Breathing Colour
by Hella Jongerius
Design Museum
London | UK
28 June > 24 September 2017



A grey ‘colour catcher’
destined for the Noon
section of the show



Although she claims to feel like an absolute beginner with it, Berlin-based, Dutch designer, Helen Jongerius lives and breathes (and probably eats and sleeps) colour. In March this year, she received the 2017 Sikkens Prize. One of the Netherlands’ oldest independent art prizes, it was established in 1960 – three years before the designer’s birth – and is awarded to individuals or institutions that are considered to have made a special contribution to the field of colour. Previous winners include Gerrit Rietveld (1960), Le Corbusier (1963), Donald Judd (1993) and Bridget Riley (2013). However, her Woven Movie that is a continuation of German textile designer Anni Albers’ pioneering work at the Bauhaus, which focussed on finding new, mass-production weaving techniques, will run the length of her forthcoming show at the Design Museum.

To label Jongerius, who founded the aptly-named Jongeriuslab design studio in 1993, where she has pursued independent, experimental projects with polyurethane, ceramics and textiles, while simultaneously creating products for clients such as Maharam, Danskina, IKEA and KLM, and has earned respect for her skill at fusing industrial and crafts methods, high- with low-tech, and traditional with contemporary, simply as an industrial designer, would be an injustice.

Jongerius has earned
respect for her skill
at fusing industrial and
crafts methods



Everyday life at the studio



Mixing quirky with classic, Jongerius has also designed furniture and household accessories for Vitra. At CasaVitra during Salone del Mobile Milano 2016, visitors were met with giant, twirling spinning tops and colour wheels, representing the past ten years of collaboration between Jongeriuslab and Vitra on the company’s colour and material library. Pitting the power of colour against that of form, the Breathing Colour exhibition will also be an installation – a natural extension of the free-flowing investigative work that is part of the everyday life of the studio – exploring the behaviour of colour and light. Like Plato, Jongerius says, she has become convinced that people can only observe a colour if they can observe the light, the reflection and absorption, and the shadow of it, ‘No wonder then, that people can get lost in colour.’ A series of three-dimensional objects she describes as colour catchers – the faceted surfaces of which are designed to absorb and reflect nearby colours – will be positioned throughout the exhibition space that will be divided into three areas, with simulated daylight conditions for morning, noon and evening.

Semi-translucent
beads mimic the
crisp colours of cold
morning light



The Morning section of the exhibition will explore the differences between lightness and brightness and the hazy feeling of waking up, via a series of illuminated hanging, translucent and semi-translucent beads, whose fragmented reflections mimic the intense and crisp colours created by cold morning light. In the Noon section, projected light will create an illusion of the transition of early morning haze to the intensity of midday, causing the facets of grey catchers displayed on bright surfaces show sharp, bright reflections. Evening will use examples of Eames, Jean Prouve and Verner Panton furniture, to explore the nature and colour of shadows.

Alongside other, existing works from the Jongeriuslab Breathing Colour by Hella Jongerius at the Design Museum will include a circular display of 100 of the designer’s Colour Vases (series 3), from 2010.

All photos Roel van Tour, courtesy the Design Museum


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Exhibition | Drawing as Evidence

Friday, May 12th, 2017

Erik van Lieshout
Untitled, 2014
Charcoal, acrylic
& ink on paper
© Erik van Lieshout.
Courtesy the artist
and Anton Kern
Gallery, New York.
Photo Thomas Müller
and Anton Kern Gallery



Graphic Witness
Drawing Room
London | UK
18 May > 9 July 2017



Andrea Bowers
Fascist Police (Inside
Eastside 1968 no 14,
page 7), 2015
Graphite on paper.
Courtesy the artist and
Kaufmann Repetto,
Milan/New York.
Photo Andrea Rossetti



On 7 January 2015, ten journalists were killed during the attack by three gunmen on the office of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, in Paris. Afterwards, the cartoons published all over the world in tribute to the dead, carried versions of the same message – that the pencil is mightier than the gun.

Beatriz González
Las Delicias 6, 1998
Charcoal on paper.
Courtesy Galeria
Casas Riegner, Bogotá



The forthcoming exhibition at Drawing Room makes the case that pencil drawings, as a medium of witness, can be as effective as photography. ‘To witness’, Kate Macfarlane, co-director of the gallery and the show’s curator, explains, ‘is to have observed, either as a participant, or remotely.’ Whereas a documentary photograph is often an immediate response to a given situation, the graphic response produced by drawing presents the evidence from a different, more measured perspective. ‘When photography is unavailable or inappropriate, drawing can act as witness, and produce subjective commentary on injustice… drawings can prompt a more wide-ranging debate about miscarriages of justice and conflict, and act as tools to prompt social change.’


Joy Gerrard
Protest Crowd,
Chicago, USA,
Trump Rally (2016), 2017
Japanese ink on linen.
© Joy Gerrard.
Courtesy the artist



Mounira Al Solh,
Are you pretending
to be Jesus?
Oil, acrylic, black
ink and charcoal
on canvas.
Courtesy the artist
& Sfeir-Semler Gallery,
Hamburg / Beirut



Graphic Witness at Drawing Room brings together the work of a broad selection of international artists from the 1930s to today, and features new work made especially for the exhibition.

All images courtesy Drawing Room


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Art | Drawing: an End in Itself

Friday, February 17th, 2017

Grayson Perry
Studio Afternoon, 2017
Ink, crayon and
graphite on paper



Drawing Biennial 2017
Drawing Room
London | UK
2 March > 26 April



Claudia Wieser
Untitled, 2016
Gold leaf, coloured
pencil and
coloured paper



For the majority of artists a drawing is not a finished item – it’s a visual note, a study, or a working rough leading towards something more complete that might be executed in another medium: a painting, a sculpture, a film, performance art, architecture. Nevertheless, as with those in this forthcoming exhibition, which includes A4 mounted works by 200 British and international artists of different generations, many of them well-known, such as Nidhal Chamekh, Michael Craig-Martin, Richard Deacon, Antony Gormley, Mona Hatoum, Chantal Joffe, Anish Kapoor, William Kentridge, Michael Landy, Humphrey Ocean, Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze, Julian Opie, Cornelia Parker, Grayson Perry, Gavin Turk, Julie Verhoeven, Yu Chen Wang, Mark Wallinger, Alison Wilding, and other less famous names, it can equally be an end in itself.

Richard Forster
Untitled, Levittown
Study
, 2014

Pencil and acrylic
medium on
Bristol board



Julian Opie
Beard,
headphones
, 2016

Vinyl on paper



Antony Gormley
SITE XXIII, 2016
Carbon and
casein on paper



Marcel van Eeden
No title, 2015
Black chalk on paper



Richard Deacon
4.11.16.1, 2016
Crayon and felt tip
pen on lino



Lubaina Himid
La Force, 2016
Pencil on paper



Drawing Biennial 2017 at Drawing Room is a free exhibition and culminates in an online auction in support of the gallery’s ongoing programme, with individual works available from £250.

All images courtesy Drawing Room © the artists


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Illustration | Brian Eno meets Quentin Blake

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Brian Eno
‘What are you like?’
Estimate £1,000 > 1,500



English Literature,
History, Children’s Books
and Illustrations

Sotheby’s
London | UK
13 December 2016



Quentin Blake
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £3,000 > 5,000



An original illustration by the seemingly unlikely figure of Brian Eno will go on sale alongside contributions from the likes of Quentin Blake, Peter Brookes and Posy Simmonds at Sotheby’s London next week to support House of Illustration. On the set theme ‘What Are You Like?’, autobiographical contributions by leading, contemporary British illustrators, such as Lauren Child, Emma Chichester Clark, Peter Brookes, and Chris Riddell, along with fashion designers, Paul Smith and Margaret Howell, as well as Dr Who actor, Peter Capaldi, and pieces by fine artists David Shrigley and Peter Blake, are also on offer to the highest bidder.

Jeff Fisher
‘What are you like?’
Estimate £800 > 1,200



Peter Brookes
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £1,500 > 2,000



House of Illustration identifies and promotes new illustration talent, commissions new work and has a pioneering illustrator-led education and outreach programme. Set up in 2014, at the heart of the King’s Cross regeneration area, it is the UK’s only public gallery dedicated solely to illustration is a registered charity and receives no public funding. It needs to raise a substantial amount of money each year to fund illustrator-led learning work with schools, teachers, families, students and enthusiasts of all ages.

Bruce Ingman
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £1,000 > 1,500



Lauren Child
‘What are you like?’
Estimate  £2,000 > 3,000



English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations at Sotheby’s, also includes rare and highly collectable items such as six handwritten manuscript copies of J K Rowling’s The Tales of Beedle the Bard, and a first edition copy of Jane Austen’s Emma.

All images courtesy Sotheby’s


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Photography | Mert & Marcus: Generation Sex

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Mert & Marcus
Tied Up, 2001



Mert & Marcus
Works 2001 > 2014
Phillips
London | UK
24 October > 3 November 2016

>

Phillips
Paris | France
9 > 16 November 2016



Mert & Marcus
Time for a Swim, 2005



For all the fetishism and indeed, nudity, of their imagery, sexiness, as such, is often in short supply in the work of fashion photographers Mert & Marcus, a selection of which will go on show from next week in a series of selling exhibitions at Phillips in London and Paris. But has ’sexy’ fashion photography gone out of fashion and, if so, how has the situation come about?

It was no co-incidence that M&M were commissioned by Vogue Paris to create the magazine’s September 2013 Grunge Fever cover. When grunge had emerged in Seattle’s music scene in the mid-80s, it brought with it a certain attitude personified by the band Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain – in photos he invariably appeared tortured and listless – who struggled with an addiction to heroin before committing suicide, aged 27, in 1994. That year, Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, both born in 1971 – Alas in Turkey and Piggott in Wales – met in England. Piggott was assisting fashion designer Alexander McQueen and taught Alas how to use a camera. Deciding to work together, three years later they took their first photographs to style magazine Dazed & Confused, who used one on the cover.

In 1990, photographer Corrine Day’s first collaboration with Kate Moss for The Face had captured grunge’s so-called ‘truth over perfection’, zeitgeist. Day and Moss’s deadpan British Vogue debut in 1993 would prove enormously influential, sending shock waves throughout the fashion industry and setting fashion photography on a course from which it has since struggled to break free. Overnight, the accessible sexiness that had first appeared in David Bailey’s pictures of Jean Shrimpton in the 1960s vanished. It was as if the life behind the eyes of the waif-like models the agencies began recruiting had been switched off. Encouraged by fashion editors, as the models stared into the void, their angular limbs falling into ungainly shapes, the younger photographers’ lenses drooling unaccountably, eroticism in fashion photography simply drained away.

Like fashion itself, sexual allure is a generational thing, but the phenomenon couldn’t be put down entirely to that – what was construed as alluring in the 1920s was still relevant in the sexually excessive 60s and 70s and the hedonistic 80s. Grunge, however, while dumping flirtation entirely, replaced the closeness of the model, who wore either a wary expression or one of of sheer boredom that communicated nothing, with distance.

Looking back, it’s not difficult to conclude that Beaton’s theatrically-posed fashion photography had lacked intimacy; Parkinson’s were too polite, and that Penn was more interested in lighting their elegant shapes than he ever was in expressing the sexuality of his models. Taking a cue from Germany’s Twen and French Elle, in the 60s and 70s, British magazine Nova made sex a mainstay: its photographers, such as Harry Peccinotti, Hans Feurer and Duffy inviting everyone to the seductive orgy that extended across its fashion and feature pages. Peccinotti’s 1971 landmark How to Undress in Front of Your Husband cover was a sensation, and the same year the magazine published a cover featuring a fetishist image of a masked blonde model in a black corset and fishnet stockings holding a coiled whip. Guy Bourdin’s photography for Nova and elsewhere was dark, sexy and challenging. Darling of the foot fetishists, interestingly, a search for his shoe images on Google, yields, among others, M&M’s Parallel Lines (included in the Phillips exhibition), miscredited to Bourdin on Pinterest. But Helmut Newton is generally given credit as the photographer who introduced fetishism, S&M and bondage into commercial photography. M&M’s inspiration is clear, but the lust and pent-up energy in Helmut Newton’s Big Nude (1978) is totally missing from their coolly stark, Lara, 2010. In his earlier work, technique and personality were foremost for Avedon, but his 1992 fetishistic photographs of model Stephanie Seymour, probably exerted an influence on M& M’s direct approach and cropping. The pair undoubtedly looked at Herb Ritts work, too, when creating Peeling Apple, 2010.

The chill wind of minimalism blew through fashion photography in the late 90s, crystallising it into frigid images of stiff, skeletal models – sexless beings that relentlessly haunted the pages of style magazines from Paris to Milan and London to New York. It was as if passion had suddenly died. The legacy of grunge wasn’t entirely to blame; in Comme des Garçons’s Spring / Summer 1997 show, Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body, Japanese designer, Rei Kawakubo, by freely adding to and adapting the female body’s lumps and bumps, was attempting to re-cast womenswear as gender-neutral.

Mert & Marcus
Peeling Apple, 2010



Mert & Marcus
Lara, 2010



A polished slickness began to materialise around about this time in the work of the emerging fashion photographers, amongst them Mert & Marcus, that would lead to enduring careers at the pinnacle of their profession. The emotion and inclusivity that are essential elements of sexy fashion images, however, remained absent. Mario Sorrenti and Miles Aldridge’s work still bears that same sense of detachment – the eroticism rarely ringing true.

Of the most successful photographers who have consistently produced glamorous and erotic fashion or fashion-based portrait images in recent years, M&M’s stablemate at the Art Partner agency, Mario Testino, stands out. Bucking the trend towards making sex a dirty word in fashion, it was Testino who helped Tom Ford present 1990s Gucci fashion as the antithesis of Kawakubo and Miuccia Prada’s deliberately unattractive, unsexy aesthetic. And Testino has stuck by his guns. In his cover shot of Claudia Schiffer, for German Vogue’s Sex issue in 2008, a fetishist game is suggested by the patent, black mask, while eye contact and body language act as an invitations to play. When he shot a nude Kate Moss for Vogue Brazil’s May 2011 cover, though she coyly turns her body away from the camera, Testino ensured that she only had eyes for you. In the 1990s – he relentlessly continues to employ the same technique – working with the healthy bodied supermodels, mixing them with the most presentable of the new, and by using sophisticated hair and make-up, Steven Meisel, was able to acknowledge grunge, but to retain a high level of sexiness in his fashion photography for Italian, French and American Vogue. Elsewhere, from the 1980s onwards, photographers such as Ellen von Unwerth and Wayne Maser, flew and continue to fly the flag of sexiness, notably through their work for the Guess jeans campaigns.

With German photographer Juergen Teller, who arrived in the wake of grunge, it was always clear that he could do sexy if he wanted to, a fact that shines through in his more recent work, and especially when Giselle is the model. When he isn’t being too crass, Terry Richardson, too, consistently creates sexy and current fashion output.

There is one other twist in the story of fashion photography, which leads back to Marcus Piggott’s old boss, Alexander McQueen, and more specifically to his muse, Isabella Blow – both, sadly, like Kurt Cobain, took their own lives – whose gothic preoccupation with death and sex, though talented in many ways, cast a funereal pall over almost every shoot she was ever involved in.

No lust for life, no joy of sex.

For the exhibition Mert & Marcus: Works 2001-2014 at Phillips’ London headquarters which travels on to Phillips’ Gallery, Paris, the photographers have selected 18 works to be made available for sale for the first time, with subjects including Cara Delevingne, Kate Moss, Karen Elson, Lara Stone and Natalia Vodianova. In addition, four unique-sized one-off works will be offered in the Photographs auction at Phillips London on 3 November 2016.

All photographs by Mert & Marcus, © Mert & Marcus,
courtesy Art Partner and Phillips

Design consultant, photographer and writer, Pedro Silmon is a former art director of The Sunday Times Magazine and of German Elle, and creative director of Condé Nast UK’s Tatler 2001 > 2008. His book, The Bikini, was published by Virgin Books in 1986


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Exhibition | Fans of Raw Color

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

The Fans, 2014, detail



Raw Color – Blend
The Aram Gallery
London | UK
19 September > 29 October 2016



Tinctorial Textiles, 2013



‘Placed on a podium a group of fans will show their different states by performing a choreography blending colour and motion.’ Extracted from Eindhoven-based design studio Raw Color’s website, the text isn’t referring to a live piece of performance art enacted by their fans, as well it might be, but rather to an installation, The Fans (2014), at LYNfabrikken Box – Aarhus, Denmark in 2014, soon to be on show again during London Design Festival 2016.

This is a long way from standard design practice, but interdisciplinary Raw Power, run by Daniera ter Haar and Christoph Brach, have built their reputation on their individual approach. The new exhibition is intended to demonstrate the flow of ideas between the group’s self-initiated and commissioned work, that leads to innovative design solutions like their Tinctorial Textiles (2013), now available to order via the Ecological Textiles webshop, but originally produced for interior designers Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe as an installation at the renewed spaces of the ABN Amro bank office in Eindhoven.

Index, 2012



Chromatology, 2015



The starting point for The Fans, Raw Color explain, was the combination of colour and its physical quality with the element of motion and its dynamic nature. Electric fans were chosen as a tool to unite these properties. The group selected a trio of paper-shredders that reacts in response to visitors’ movements, creating a colourful paper trail for Chromatology (2015), which references Vincent van Gogh’s experimental colour mixing, and is also included in Raw Color – Blend, along with Index (2012), a collection of towels and blankets they designed that breaks down the graduations of tone in coloured, woven textiles.

A forum for experimental, contemporary design ideas, The Aram Gallery will also debut three new projects currently being developed by the group.

All images courtesy The Aram Gallery


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Art | Abstract China

Friday, July 15th, 2016

Qian Jiahua
Blue Space, 2016
Acrylic on canvas



The World is Yours, as Well as Ours
White Cube Mason’s Yard
London | UK
15 July > 17 September 2016



Liang Quan
Looking for Another Earth,
2016
Ink, colour and paper collage on canvas
Photo © White Cube (Ben Westoby)



The modernisation policies instituted in the late 1970s by Deng Xiaoping, offered Chinese artists opportunities – albeit limited and carefully-controlled – to explore and learn about the art that was being produced elsewhere in the world. At the same time, they were given the chance to work independently of state commissioning and outside the hitherto exclusively sanctioned socialist realist style. The result was work in a profusion of different styles, including abstraction.

If Kazimir Malevich’s abstract painting Black Square (1915) had symbolically blanked out Russia’s past, Chinese abstract art would develop into a symbolic way of welcoming back China’s.

A selection of contemporary Chinese abstract art goes on show from today at White Cube Mason’s Yard, where it can be seen that in terms of approach and materials, the artists have chosen to reference the values and artistic creations of their own history that had been systematically eradicated during the Cultural Revolution.

Zhou Li
Enjoyment of Water No.5,
2016
Mixed media on canvas



Jiang Zhi
The world is yours, as well as ours – Display 31,
2015>2016
Oil on canvas



Yu Youhan
Abstract 2007.12.1,
2007
Acrylic on canvas



Liang Quan (b 1948), for example, creates mixed media collages that incorporate rice paper and ink as ‘abstract diagrams of traditional Chinese landscape’. Strikingly modern and graphic, Jiang Zhi’s (b 1971) paintings – meticulously rendered copies of the fractured images that occur on computer monitors as a result of data glitches or system errors – nevertheless retain a strong link to traditional Chinese landscape painting. Also influenced by natural surroundings such as the mountainous areas of southern China, free-flowing charcoal lines and ink washes, overlaid with solid arcs and circles of white paint, in delicate, harmonious compositions are features of Zhou Li’s (b 1969) work.

Liu Wentao
Untitled,
2015
Graphite on canvas



On the other hand, Yu Youhan’s (b 1943) ‘Circle’ paintings are an exploration of the ying and yang concept of harmonious unity expressed within Taoism. Liu Wentao (b1973) takes inspiration from a central tenet of Taoism, producing works made with densely drawn pencil lines that interweave to create ambiguity between ‘the concrete and the void’. Liu studied in America, where he saw and was influenced by the minimalist works of Agnes Martin and Ellsworth Kelly. But at other times, as in Qian Jiahua’s (b 1987) spatial compositions that comprise solid blocks of colour, anchored with borders and lines that subtly disrupt the flatness of the image, the Chinese historical references are unclear.

All of the artists included in The World is Yours, as Well as Ours at White Cube Mason’s Yard were born, live and work in China.

All works © the artists, courtesy White Cube


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Photography | J.H. Lartigue / On Holiday

Friday, June 10th, 2016

‘Renée Biarritz, August 1930′



J.H.Lartigue ‘The Blink of an Eye’
Michael Hoppen Gallery
London | UK
8 June > 9 August 2016



‘Véra et Arlette, Cannes, Mai, 1927’



‘Florette, Monte Carlo beach, août 1953′



‘Bibi, Arlette and Irène. Cannes, 1929′



‘Coco on the terrace, Neuilly, June 1938’



The Blog team is on holiday.

If you’re in London, we recommend you try to see J.H.Lartigue ‘The Blink of an Eye’ at the Michael Hoppen Gallery. The exhibition is curated by Hoppen himself, together with author and Lartigue enthusiast William Boyd, who recently wrote an excellent piece – that we also recommend you read – about the great master of the snapshot, on The Guardian’s website

All photographs by JH Lartigue © Ministère de la Culture, France / AAJHL
All images courtesy Michael Hoppen Gallery


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin