Posts Tagged ‘Los Angeles’

Exhibitions | Perfecting Warhol

Friday, February 1st, 2019

Candy Spelling, 1985,
photographed
at The Factory
Polaroid



Andy Warhol at Casa Perfect
Casa Perfect
Los Angeles | USA
15 February > 22 March



Edie & Kipp
Film still



The Couch
Film still



We feel very honoured. Casa Perfect – which, in our ignorance, The Blog had never heard of, but which somehow has heard of us – has kindly sent us an invitation to a private cocktail party celebrating its first fine art installation, during Frieze Los Angeles, when it is hosting a selling exhibition of ‘never-before-seen’ photographs and films made by Andy Warhol.

Photography was central to Warhol’s oeuvre. In the early 1960s, he began appropriating images of Marilyn Monroe, Jackie Kennedy, Marlon Brando, and Elvis Presley. Enticingly, Casa Perfect is located at Presley’s former home – he lived there for six years at the height of his career – in an exclusive area of Beverly Hills. The mid-century property recently became the LA outpost of David Alhadeff’s painstakingly-curated, contemporary furniture and interior accessories outlet, The Future Perfect.

Diana Vreeland, 1983,
photographed
in her infamous red
living room at her
5th Ave apartment
Polaroid



Crosses, 1982,
photographed at
The Factory and
used as source
material to create
prints and paintings
Polaroid



Alhadeff, who founded his company in 2003, and who also has galleries in New York and San Francisco, thinks that shopping has become a chore. Casa Perfect, where visitors are welcome strictly by appointment only, presents gallery-like vignettes in a residential setting. Alhadeff says that it is his way of providing clients with a more intimate, personal experience with important, collectable design and of ‘reawakening the excitement of discovering the new’.

It’s perhaps something of a paradox, however, that Alhadeff, whose business prides itself in presenting short-run, often handmade pieces by named designers – items that are out of reach to the vast majority of people – has chosen to exhibit Andy Warhol’s work at Casa Perfect. Despite the artist’s fixation with wealth, money and fame, he probably did more to democratise art than any artist before him. He was strongly opposed to the noble ideals of the 19th-century British Arts and Crafts movement that espoused a return to craftsmanship and rejected the Industrial Revolution. Famously embracing mass-production, Warhol once declared that he wanted to be a machine.

Lou Reed
Film still




Archie & George
Film still



Andy Warhol at Casa Perfect, featuring images of, among others, Jane Fonda, Lana Turner, Tina Chow, Candy Spelling, Diana Vreeland and Lou Reed, will include photo-booth strips, silver gelatin prints and short films. Apologies: the company refuses to share the prices of its exhibits, and there is no available online link to the show for us to post for you.

All images by Andy Warhol, from the James Hedges Foundation, courtesy Casa Perfect


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Auction | One Man’s Vicarious Visions of America

Friday, December 1st, 2017

Elizabeth Heyert (1951 >)
Death portraits, from
the series ‘The Travelers’ 6

£2300 > 3800
$3000 > 5000



The Producer’s Pix
Photographs from the
Collection
of Bruce Berman
Bonhams
Los Angeles | California | USA
Exhibition 9 December > 14 December
Sale 14 December 2017



Manuel Alvarez Bravo
(1902 > 2002)
La Operacion Hospital,
Juarez, Mexico

£1500 > 2300
$2000 > 3000



Presumed Innocent, New Jack City, The Client, GoodFellas, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, Malcolm X, The Bodyguard, JFK, The Matrix trilogy, Ocean’s Eleven, Mystic River, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and The Logo Movie are just a few of more than 100 major Hollywood films that Bruce Berman has been passionately involved in producing since 1984. Berman also has another passion: photography.

Steven Soderbergh, who directed some of those movies, was asked to write an introduction to the catalogue for this forthcoming sale of a portion of Berman’s collection of photographs. In it he explains that a great photograph is a story. A great collection also tells a story about its collector.

William Christenberry
(1936 >)
House in Summertime,
Greensboro, Alabama

£1500 > 2300
$2000 > 3000



Andrew Moore
(1957 >)
War of 1812 Mural,
Building 125, Governors
Island, New York

£3000 > 4500
$4000 > 6000



Berman’s advice to someone who wants to start a collection is ‘to go with what strikes them, with whatever hits that button in them.’ His own taste in photography was formed by his early experiences. Having been given a Kodak Brownie camera for his eighth birthday, he immediately began taking pictures. In his teens he graduated to an SLR and while at college – inspired by Jack Kerouac’s On The Road novel – made epic road trips across America, stopping at the roadside to photograph whatever caught his eye.

Christian Patterson
(1972 >)
No Nothing, from
‘RedHeaded Peckerwood’

£600 > 900
$800 > 1200



As his career progressed, he began buying work he liked by photographers such as Diane Arbus and William Eggleston. And when, in 1988, after a decade in the film business, he was earning enough to pay photographers to travel around the country producing their own work on his behalf, he dispatched them to the Midwest, to Minnesota and Wisconsin, or to the South. Revelling in his vicarious wanderings and describing himself as ‘totally addicted’ to collecting, by 2007, Berman, aided by his wife, Nancy, had amassed 2,600 photos. He donated many to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, which that year mounted the exhibition, Where We Live: Photographs of America from the Berman Collection. By focussing on one particular genre, and, via his commissioning and discovery of new talent, having made a direct contribution to the formulation of the genre itself, Bruce Berman had justly earned a place in the history of American photography.

The film mogul currently owns a mere 700 prints. Having accepted that he is now at a different phase in his life, he says that he no longer gets sad when he sells or donates his a photographs.

Dorothea Lange
(1895-1965)
Funeral Cortege,
End of an Era in a
Small Valley Town

£11000 > 19000
$15000 > 25000



Sheron Rupp
(1943 >)
Shawnee; and Utica, Ohio 2
£750 > 1100
$1000 > 1500



Elsewhere in the catalogue, The Getty’s Judith Keller and Anna Lacoste describe Berman’s personal collection as ‘an archive of late twentieth-century American life’. If one presumes that the images being offered in this auction are a representative selection from the work he accumulated, it might be fair to conclude, however, that in avoiding extremes – of poverty, of wealth, of depravity, of political, environmental, racial, and sexual issues – despite the pioneering spirit on which it was founded and pursued, the richness and quality of its content and Berman’s enthusiasm for photography, his story of life in the USA during the period in which these photographs were created is a fascinating, offbeat, but ultimately sentimental and nostalgic journey.

The Producer’s Pix: Photographs from the Collection of Bruce Berman at Bonhams includes 170 lots by, among others, Stephen Shore, whose work is the subject of a major retrospective currently on show at MoMA in New York.

All images courtesy Bonhams


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Culture | From Bauhaus to Black Mountain

Friday, February 19th, 2016

Hazel Larsen Archer, Merce Cunningham dancing,
contact sheet, c1952-53
Estate of Hazel Larsen Archer and Black
Mountain College Museum and Arts Center



Leap Before You Look:
Black Mountain College 1933-1957

The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles | California | USA
21 February > 15 May 2016



Josef Albers, Tenayuca, 1943
Oil on fibreboard
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York



Adolph Hitler did modernism a great service. Paradoxically, in trying to stamp out the movement’s philosophies, in particular by systematically harassing the Bauhaus, whose staff eventually decided to close the school rather than compromise with the Third Reich, he guaranteed the international dissemination of modernist teaching.

Some of the key Bauhaus figures passed through London, leaving a legacy of teaching ideas that would be a major influence on institutions such as the Royal College of Art in the postwar period. But sooner or later, the majority of them emigrated to the USA.

When former director Ludwig Mies van der Rohe arrived in Chicago in 1938, where he was appointed head of the architecture school at the Armour Institute of Technology (later, Illinois Institute of Technology/IIT), László Moholy-Nagy had already established the New Bauhaus there the previous year. Walter Gropius, would become a senior professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, while Marcel Breuer taught at Yale. In 1933, the year the Bauhaus had ceased operations, Josef Albers, speaking no English, had also begun teaching at Yale. However, via a recommendation from the Museum of Modern Art, he was soon hired as the first head of Black Mountain College, a new art school in the relative obscurity of Ashville, North Carolina.

Far less well-known internationally than the New Bauhaus – only scant references are made to it via any currently available UK sources – 10 years ago London’s Arnolfini gallery held an exhibition of a limited selection of the school’s works – the Tate website honours it with just 200 words  – by the 1940s, Black Mountain College became the ideal of experimental arts education in America.

Anni Albers and Alexander Reed, Neck Piece, 1940
Aluminium strainer, paper clips, and chain
The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation
© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/
Artists Rights Society New York.
Photo Tim Nighswander/Imaging 4 Art



Buckminster Fuller, Black Mountain College,
1948/1990, Nancy Newhall

Gelatin silver print
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
©1948, Nancy Newhall, ©2014 The Estate
of Beaumont and Nancy Newhall.
Permission to reproduce courtesy of
Scheinbaum and Russek Ltd, Santa Fe, NM



John Cage, Hazel Larsen Archer
Gelatin silver print
Estate of Hazel Larsen Archer and Black
Mountain College Museum and Arts Center



Conceived by the – by all accounts – brilliant scholar John A Rice, BMC was a completely new type of college based on US philosopher John Dewey’s principles of progressive education. Dewey – reputedly the most significant educational thinker of his era in America – believed that human beings learn through a ‘hands on’ approach and that teachers and students must learn together. Bauhaus students and staff had lived and eaten side by side and embraced a modern lifestyle that included the whole person – body, mind and soul. In the 1919 Bauhaus manifesto Walter Gropius had announced that theatre, lectures, poetry, music, and costume parties, were all part of the programme. The parties promoted contact between the college and the public, an idea that Dewey also endorsed.

Josef Albers, despite his language difficulties, would quickly develop a system that successfully combined both Dewey’s and Bauhaus educational principles, and assemble a board of directors that included Albert Einstein. With great aplomb he put together a formidable and diverse faculty made up of, among others, his talented textile-designer wife Anni Albers, Walter Gropius, Jacob Lawrence, Willem de Kooning, R Buckminster Fuller, Ruth Asawa, and Cy Twombly. Famous alumni would include Robert Rauschenberg, who would describe Albers as having influenced him to do ‘exactly the reverse’ of what he had previously been taught, and John Cage, who staged his first ‘happening’ at the school.

Ruth Asawa, Untitled (S 272), c1955
Copper and iron wire
Private Collection. © Estate of Ruth Asawa.
Photo Laurence Cuneo



Albers left in 1949. As a result of a shift in trends that saw students and faculty drawn towards the cities of San Francisco and New York, in 1953, BMC, having endured 10 years longer than the Bauhaus, closed. A powerhouse, modern educational establishment, the college’s revolutionary and influential methods and ideas would fundamentally change the way in which the visual arts were taught across America, and leave behind a lasting legacy.

Presenting a broad selection of paintings, sculpture, textiles and photography, and including over 250 objects by nearly 100 artists, Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957 at The Hammer Museum is the first comprehensive museum exhibition about the school.

All images courtesy The Hammer Museum


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Art | Surfing Over Manhattan

Friday, March 28th, 2014

No Title (Here and there), 1995
Pen and ink on paper
Private Collection, New York




Are Your Motives Pure?
Raymond Pettibon Surfers 1985 > 2013
Venus Over Manhattan
980 Madison Avenue
New York City | USA
3rd April > 17th May 2014

Stylistically, Raymond Pettibon’s work stems from comic book art, but has little in common with that of Roy Lichtenstein. Besides, much of its content: American history, literature, sports, religion, politics, and sexuality, doesn’t celebrate the images thrown up by capitalism, but rather, is his very personal critique of contemporary life, through which, according to his biography on the Tate’s website, he [seeks] to redefine attitudes toward values in art and culture. He does, however, have super-heroes: the sea is one of them, of which across the top of No Title (The sea, the), 2005, in uncompromising capital letters he writes:

‘THE SEA, THE MOUNTAIN-RIDGE, NIAGARA, AND EVERY FLOWERBED PRE-EXIST, OR SUPER EXIST, IN PRE-CANTATIONS, WHICH SAIL LIKE ODORS IN THE AIR, AND WHEN ANY MAN GOES BY WITH AN EAR SUFFICIENTLY FINE, HE OVERHEARS THEM, AND ENDEAVORS TO WRITE DOWN THE NOTES, WITHOUT DILUTING OR DEPRAVING THEM.’

and the lone surfer is another, of whom on the same painting, below, he scrawls:

‘He is the person in whom all these powers are in the balance, the man without impendiment [sic], who sees and handles that which others dream of, traverses the whole scale of experience, in virtue of being the largest power to receive and impart it.’

No Title (When the surf), 2008
Private Collection via CFA Berlin, Armonk, NY


Akin to the rantings of some Bible-belt preacher, Pettibon’s enigmatic messages often appear almost biblical in tone – and, in presentation, the word / picture ensembles are reminiscent of the work of English painter, engraver and mystic William Blake (1757>1827), who claimed that most of his work as a writer and artist was done under the direct inspiration of spiritual guides. Could Pettibon’s inspiration rise from a similar source? Well, no, the press release for this exhibition, informs us that his prolific output of drawings and paintings stem from the ‘do-it-yourself’ aesthetic of Southern California punk rock album-covers, concert flyers, and fanzines. His brother, Greg Ginn – Pettibon is a pseudonym– was a founder member of West Coast punk band Black Flag, founded in the late 70s. Pettibon, himself, who briefly played bass in the band, came up with its name and designed its logo. However, feeling that the negativity of punk ruined a lot of people’s lives, his heart was never in it, but he retained his links with the music world, designing the cover of Sonic Youth’s album Goo, in 1990.

Much of Pettibon’s visual output looks like the work of someone who never went near an art college, nor sketched a nude in a studio, which is a correct assumption to make – self-trained, he graduated from UCLA in 1977 with a degree in economics, beginning his working life as a maths teacher, before launching his career as an artist – but then you’re taken aback because the drawing, while not on a par with Leonardo da Vinci’s dexterity, exactly, is often fluid and well-observed. On the other hand, the execution can verge on the primitive, and so perhaps Pettibon’s is a kind of idiosyncratic folk art like graffiti – you can almost imagine it appearing overnight scrawled across the walls of an underpass, or the previously pristine screening erected around the construction site of some shiny new high-rise development.

No Title (This left was), 2012
Pen, ink, colored pencil, acrylic, gouache and collage on paper
Courtesy Venus Over Manhattan, New York


It’s unsurprising to find that Pettibon is a serial tweeter (@RaymondPettibon), and here the themes that are integral to his paintings, continue. Unsupported by visuals, his splurge of cryptic, political and sexual statements take on a curious life of their own, and might constitute an ongoing separate body of work. Recent Pettibon tweets include:

My liiver’s fine.How’s yr concience?Fine.Bcuzz u are a sociopath.Swell.
I’m patriotic.I jerked Obama off.
Teach yr children to disrespect cops,stand up to the pussies.They are wicked.
See the Pandas.
!0.5K followers?More than Jim Jones had at Jonestown.
My elbow tube sock.Easy access.Call the shots.

Venus Over Manhattan’s show is the first exhibition to focus exclusively on Raymond Pettibon’s surfer paintings. Are Your Motives Pure? Raymond Pettibon Surfers 1985-2013, brings together forty works spanning a quarter century of the artist’s career. Somewhat contradictorily, it takes its title from the earliest work on view, painted in 1987, but who, in what might be Pettibon’s parlance, gives a f*ck! The artist, born in 1957 in Tucson, Arizona, who lives and works in the beach town of Venice, California, is, however, not a surfer, nor does he consider his paintings ’surfer art’ – as typified by much of the very much slicker examples to be seen on websites such as Club of the Waves.

No Title (The sea, the), 2005
Ink, oil and watercolor on paper
Courtesy Venus Over Manhattan


Since Pettibon’s emergence as an artist in the 1980s his work has been exhibited widely in the USA and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include David Zwirner Gallery, New York (2013), the Kunstmuseum Luzern, Lucerne (2012), Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2006), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2005). His first American museum presentation, organized by The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago in collaboration with the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1998, travelled to The Drawing Center, New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

A participant in numerous group exhibitions worldwide, including at the Istanbul Biennial (2011), Liverpool Biennial (2010), SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico (2010 and 2004), Venice Biennale (2007 and 1999), Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2004, 1997, 1993, and 1991), and documenta XI, Kassel, Germany (2002), his work is held in the permanent collections of, among others, the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris,Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tate Gallery, London; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Pettibon is represented by Regen Projects in LA, and Sadie Coles in London.


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The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Architecture | LA’s Quincy Jones

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

A Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living
The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles, USA
Until 8th September, 2013

Phenomenally productive, Archibald Quincy Jones, who practiced architecture in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death in 1979, was responsible for over 5,000 built projects. As testament to his passion for ‘better living’, and the clients and homeowners who shared his dream, many still exist. Oddly though, in comparison to other architects like Charles and Ray Eames, Eero Saarinin and Richard Neutra, who were his West Coast contemporaries, Jones isn’t that well-known. The Hammer exhibition, part of the larger Getty-sponsored initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in LA, is intended to rescue ‘Quincy’ – as he was known – from obscurity.

Modernist to the core, he might have built large-scale private homes for the likes of film star Gary Cooper, but Jones also designed everything from churches, schools, and libraries to commercial buildings – expanded headquarters for furniture manufacturer Herman Miller, Warner Brothers Records headquarters – bringing high standards of design to Southern California’s growing middle class. Reconsidering and refining postwar housing and emphasising cost-effective, and sustainable building methods, he was an innovative, visionary architect and urban planner who pioneered the use of communal space, greenbelts and green design. He viewed developments as an opportunity to build community through shared green spaces, varied home models, and non-grid site planning. He designed and completed his own house in 1954 – sadly, despite its steel frame construction, burned to the ground during the infamous Bel Air fire of 1961 – in the same community for which he developed 27 houses of 300 lots in 1948. Jones’s three-decade career included an 18-year partnership with Frederick E Emmons, with whom he produced designs for thousands of houses for property developer Joseph Eichler – one of America’s most influential builders of modern homes – between 1950 and the mid-1970s.

A Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living which draws from collections including Jones’s personal and professional archives housed at UCLA, where he was an influential professor of architecture, presents original architectural drawings, a rare Case Study model for a house (unbuilt), and vintage photographs by, among others, the eminent Julius Shulman. New photography which the Museum commissioned from Jason Schmidt, are also included in the exhibition – a few key images enlarged to almost actual size, to allow visitors to experience something close to a physical presence of Jones’s architecture.

You can find a bit about Jones on Wikepedia and elsewhere on the internet, but nothing very substantial, however The Hammer show together with Phaidon’s timely, lavishly-illustrated A Quincy Jones: The first book on the pioneering American architect, by architect Cory Buckner, who bought and lives in a Jones-designed house, should do much to bring the architect the exposure he justly deserves.

Images from top
Warner Brothers Records building, Burbank, California, 1971-75
A Quincy Jones and Associates, Architects

Schneidman House, Mutual Housing Association (CrestwoodHills), Los Angeles, California, 1946-50
A Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith, and Edgardo Contini, Architects and Engineer

Sidney F and Frances Brody House, Los Angeles, California, 1948-51
William Haines, interior designer
Gouache of open-air living room
Courtesy The Huntington Library, San Marino, California

St Michael’s and All Angels Episcopal Church, Studio City, California, 1960-62
A Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects

Gross House, Mutual Housing Association (Crestwood Hills), Los Angeles, California, 1946-50
A Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith, and Edgardo Contini, Architects and Engineer

All images, except 3, Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, California, USA
All Photos Jason Schmidt, 2012


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The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Art | West Coast Story

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Pacific Standard Time Art in Los Angeles 1950-1980
Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany
March 15th – June 10th, 2012

LA has come to the UK in the person of admittedly British-but-based-there, David Hockney whose Ways of Seeing: ‘A Bigger Picture’ – David Hockney at the Royal Academy of Arts, a major exhibition of his recent landscape paintings, currently running in London – is a sell out. Meanwhile, Ellsworth Kelly, based in New York City but having shared a long and healthy relationship with the City of Angels has gone there – his show, Ellsworth Kelly: Prints and Paintings is on at The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, while concurrently the new LA branch of New York’s Matthew Marks Gallery are showing Ellsworth Kelly: Los Angeles, as their inaugural exhibition. But that’s not all. Sotheby’s New York are hosting a selling exhibition, Southern California Minimalism: 1960 to the present. All big events in the art calendar. All with a Californian connection. But if you thought that was the end of it, Pacific Standard Time, Art (Kunst) in Los Angeles 1950 -1980, due to make a bigger splash than any of the above, is on at Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Bau – its sole European venue – from the mid-March until 10th June.

When Hockney finally took the plunge: leaving Britain in 1966, after having paddled around a bit in the US over the previous couple of years, he dived headlong into an LA arts scene already brimming over with ideas and experimentation. Hockney’s iconic, A Bigger Splash, 1967, is seen by the curators as a key image representing the hedonistic LA lifestyle. However, the aim is to demonstrate that, as well as being home to Hollywood, the city and indeed, the West Coast, had a lot more than surfing, sunshine and palm trees going for it. The exhibition will attempt to make clear, through works by Richard Dinebenkom and Ed Ruscha, that Southern California was one of the leading centres for large-format pop art and abstract painting in the 1960s. When the USA’s Atlantic Coast painters were growing in significance, artists on the West Coast were beginning to extend their notions of traditional painting and sculpture. Experimentation with new processes and materials was taking place; works that arose out of a collision between art and technology, for example, a fibre-glass sculpture by Bruce Nauman will be on show. The German exhibition is an attempt at a comprehensive appraisal – embracing paintings, sculpture, ceramics and photography, as well as exhibition catalogues, books, posters, postcards, invitations and letters – within a specific time band. As a way of demonstrating the strong international networks that linked LA to other artists around the world the inclusion of the flotsam and jetsam: the ephemera associated with artists, for example, their letters to one another and to artists abroad, has been collected together and will be exhibited. Visitors will be introduced to the art dealers and collectors whose backing facilitated the artists’ inevitable rise to the surface. Funded by the Getty Foundation of Los Angeles and organised by the Berliner Festspiele and the Martin-Gropius-Bau, the show will bring the two core exhibitions of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute to Europe, however, in all, over 60 galleries and institutions have been involved in providing material.

As well as Hockney’s, a veritable tsunami of work by other artists, all produced on the West Coast, will flood the Berlin gallery: Peter Alexander – his Cloud Box (Large), 1966 is included, John Altoon, John Baldessari, Larry Bell – several of his minimal pieces will be there, while others, including Cube #22 and Cube #16 (Gren), are being shown in the Sotheby’s exhibition. Billy Al Bengston, Karl Benjamin, Ed Bereal, Wallace Berman, Cameron, Vija Celmins, Judy Chicago – her acrylic Big Blue Pink, 1971, will all be represented together with work by Mary Corse, Ronald Davis, the aforementioned Richard Diebenkorn, Melvin Edwards, Frederick Eversley, Lorser Feitelson, Llyn Foulkes, Sam Francis, Joe Goode and Robert Graham. Frederick Hammersley’s sensitive abstract oil painting Up Within, 1957 – 1958 will be there. The curators have selected pieces by George Herms, Stephan von Huene and Craig Kauffman. Edward Kienholz’s mixed media figurative sculpture, Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps, 1959 is one of the early works that can see seen. Helen Lundeberg, John Mason – his glazed ceramic piece, Orange Cross, 1963, Allan McCollum, John McCracken – his yellow, oblong sculpture Galaxy also features in the New York sale, are all being shown. Other work surfing its way into the Martin-Gropius-Bau will be by John McLaughlin, Ron Miyashiro, Ed Moses, Lee Mullican and Bruce Nauman’s installation, Four Corner Piece, executed in 1971 is also being exhibited. There’ll be work by Helen Pashgian, Ken Price and Noah Purifoy. Ed Ruscha’s 1963 pop art piece, Standard Station, Amarillo, Texas, will be shown. Betye Saar and Henry Takemoto are included. Red Concave Circle, 1970, executed in polyester by DeWain Valentine will be there, and pieces by Peter Voulkos, Gordon Wagner, Norman Zammitt. Many of these names may seem obscure but the curators feel that these individuals made significant contributions to the West Coast scene between 1950-80 and are worthy of reconsideration.

More than just as a reference point but rather, because he was the most important American architecture photographer of the post-war period and his images of modernist houses built by Richard Neutra, Frank Lloyd Wright and Frank Gehry are artistic icons in their own right, more than 50 photographs by Julius Shulman are included in the exhibition.

Far from being a ’standard’ time on the Pacific coast, the organisers of the Martin-Gropius-Bau show are out to prove that the years between 1950 and 1980 in Southern California were awash with innovative artists producing exceptional art that was equal to, and sometimes more pioneering than, any contemporaneous work going on elsewhere in the world.

Works, from top
Frederick Hammersley, Up Within, 1957–58
Peter Alexander, Cloud Box (Large), 1966
Ed Ruscha, Standard Station, Amarillo, Texas, 1963
Bruce Nauman, Four Corner Piece, 1971
David Hockney, A Bigger Splash, 1967
Julius Shulman, Case Study House #22, 1960
De Wain Valentine, Red Concave Circle, 1970
Larry Bell, Untitled, Wall Piece, 1967
Edward Kienholz, Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps, 1959
Frederick Hammersley, Up Within, 1957–58
Peter Alexander, Cloud Box (Large), 1966
Ed Ruscha, Standard Station, Amarillo, Texas, 1963
Bruce Nauman, Four Corner Piece, 1971
David Hockney, A Bigger Splash, 1967
Julius Shulman, Case Study House #22, 1960
De Wain Valentine, Red Concave Circle, 1970
Larry Bell, Untitled, Wall Piece, 1967
Edward Kienholz, Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps, 1959

Related shows
David Hockney RA: A Bigger Picture
The Royal Academy, London, UK. Until 9 April 2012
Ellsworth Kelly: Prints and Paintings
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, USA
Until 22nd April 2012
Ellsworth Kelly: Los Angeles
Matthew Marks Gallery, Los Angeles, USA
Until 7th April 2012
Southern California Minimalism: 1960 to the Present
Selling exhibition Sotheby’s New York, 2 – 23rd March, 2012

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