Posts Tagged ‘PIASA’

Photography | The Fine Art of Protest

Friday, October 10th, 2014

Gilles Caron
Daniel Cohn Bendit in front
of the Sorbonne
, Paris, 6th May, 1968

Silver print on barium-coated paper, 2014
Estimate €3000 > 4ooo



Protest! Art+Design 1960-1980
PIASA
Paris | France
Exhibition 24th > 28th October 2014
Sale 28th October 2014



The Magnum co-operative was founded in Paris, in 1947, by a small group of gifted and sought after documentary photographers, who wanted to continue working independently, but recognised the negotiation advantages of being part of a group. The accepted norm, at the time, was that the copyright for commissioned photography belonged to the clients. Magnum protested vociferously and set out to change all that. Insisting that the copyright of their members must remain their own property, the group triggered a worldwide resistance movement among photographers. Succeeding years saw the re-drafting of international copyright laws that nowadays guarantee statutory protection for the copyright of a photographer’s work.

Jean-Pierre Laffont
Wanted, Washington, 9th August, 1974
Digital print, 2014
Estimate €1000 > 1500

Who, in the immediate post-WW II years, having lived through a prolonged period of conflict, strife, death and destruction would have imagined that the great expansion of the art market that arrived with the economic boom years of the 1980s, would see contemporary reportage photography – scenes of conflict, of strife, even of death and destruction – become seriously accepted as an art form, and sold as such for substantial sums of money, through galleries and auction houses across the globe? Magnum’s efforts of some three decades before, ensured that a significant part of the money earned from these images was paid to those responsible for their creation, and the same is true now.

Jürgen Schadeberg
Demonstration against the
Falklands War, London, 1982
Ink-jet print on Hahnemühle
paper,
made by the photographer, 2014

Estimate €2000 > 3000

Patrick Chauvel
Girls of the IRA, Belfast,
Northern Ireland, 1969

Digital print on Hahnemühle paper
Estimate €2000 > 2500

Dominated by sculpture, ceramics, posters and prints, cartoons and drawings, and including magazines, books, and furniture, the 295-item list of lots included in Paris-based PIASA’s forthcoming Protest! Art+Design 1960-1980 auction, also contains a number of documentary photographs from the era.

The 1960s and 1970s were periods of profound political and social change, prompted by a new libertarian élan and a burning desire to change the world. These years saw the rise of the feminist, ecology and anti-militarist movements, as well as the emergence of postmodernist ideas in design and architecture. In what is in essence a curated sale, PIASA have brought together a diverse collection of lots representing French and international political radicalism to anti-design, taking in along the way, punk, the feminist movement, and nouveaux realism.

Patrick Chauvel
The beginning of the end, Tehran,
Iran, 11th December, 1978
Digital print on Hahnemühle paper, 2014
Estimate €2000 > 2500

Doàn Tinh Cong
Pathfinders, Vietnam, 1970
Digital print, 2014, on Hahnemühle paper
Estimate €2000 > 2500

Sharing protest as inspiration, but not always immediately recognisable as such, work by artists such as Christo, Christian Boltanski, Yoko Ono, and Joseph Beuys are just a few of those represented. French artist, Annette Message’s Le barbu d’Annette Messager, la femme tatouée, 1975, consists of four photographs of female pubic hair with cartoon-like male faces seemingly tattooed onto the area of the belly above. Tawaraya, is a scaled-down boxing ring designed by Masanori Umeda for the Italian postmodern Memphis group in 1981, estimated price €15,000 > 20,000.

A loose selection of powerful, and almost entirely black and white documentary photographs by, for example, Ian Berry, Gilles Caron and Jean Pierre Laffont, falls somewhere in the middle of the catalogue. Hemmed in by the ironic and the arcane, these images, created by those with a mission to show the world what protest in many of its forms actually looked like, were never produced as art, but are certainly fine, and well worthy of the high prices attached to them by the copyright holders.

Sadly Magnum’s strict copyright policy, prevents us from using any of their photographers’ images with this post.

Images courtesy PIASA



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Sculpture | A Glimpse of Michel Deverne

Friday, June 6th, 2014

Etoile éclatée, 1968
Lacquered stainless steel panel
€8,000 > 12,000


Michel Deverne
Wood, Metal, Paper
PIASA Rive Gauche
Paris | France
Exhibition 19th June > 25th June 2014
Sale 25th June 2014



French artist, Michel Deverne’s giant-size sculpture Les Miroirs (1981) at La Défense – also known as La Grande Mosaïque – formed by ten giant cylinders, at 2.3 m², is considered the largest work, ever produced using the mosaic technique.

Information on Deverne, however, is elusive. An initial trawl of the internet brings little reward – a few images of him in his later years, a couple of pictures of his bass-relief works and some rather dull shots of the aforementioned mosaic sculpture. Wallpaper* ran an obituary just after his death, aged 84 in February 2012, that refers to an interview they did with him in 2011. Unwilling to simply plagiarise the magazine’s articles, or repeat the scant text of the auction house’s press release, I resolved to continue my search elsewhere.

On their site, Paris’s Centre Pomidou, where Deverne’s works have been exhibited, gives only the dates of his birth and death. The city’s Grande Palais, where the artist has also been exhibited, on my having entered his name and clicked the search button on their site, rewarded me with the following advice: ‘Check if your spelling is correct. Remove quotes around phrases to search for each word individually: bike shed will often show more results than “bike shed”. Consider loosening your query with OR. bike OR shed will often show more results than bike shed.’ So I tried Michel OR Deverne and predictably, got nowhere.



Nuage
Draft of sculpture for a stretch of water, 1982

Cardboard
€2,000 > 3,000



Obelisque no 6
Study for Togo’s Monument of Independence, 1976

Cardboard
€2,000 > 3,000



Table, 1970
Pine wood and stainless steel
€3,000 > 4,000



Deverne’s sculptures have been installed in many public places in France and also around the world – in cities like Rotterdam and Tel Aviv, as well as in Saudi Arabia, Japan, Canada, Senegal, Belgium, Cameroon and the United States – but a search via New York’s MoMA site brought zero results, as did another at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Tate Modern’s site has nothing on him.

Aware that Deverne drew much of his artistic inspiration from architecture and the city, I thought London’s Design Museum might have something. Nothing. The Vitra Museum perhaps? – No. Deverne was French, but I thought the Royal Institute of British Architecture, could be worth trying, but again, zero results.

Michel Deverne became a Professor at the Paris Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1977 – I drew a blank on their website, too – and was awarded a silver medal in Arts Plastiques by France’s Académie d’Architecture in 1983. Here I struck lucky – 20 articles in which he is mentioned – Wow! – but they were only available in French, and sadly, I don’t speak French. Should you be equally handicapped but want to learn more about Deverne go to the Wallpaper* link. There, amongst a lot of very interesting detail about his life and his remarkable creations you’ll find a link to the Paris gallery, RCM, which, when the feature was created, apparently represented him. However, Deverne’s name, if it ever did, doesn’t appear on their list of artists.

Michel Deverne: Wood, Metal, Paper, PIASA’s final sale of the season at the Espace Rive Gauche will be held on June 25, when sixty works will be sold. The company’s design department will be staging a dialogue between the works of Michel Deverne and Paul Kingma – another French artist inspired by architecture – in a setting created by Dorothée Meilichzon.

All object images © PIASA
Portrait by Christophe Rouffio



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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Design | Italy in Paris

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Osvaldo Borsani
Model at16 coatstand
in leather, brass and walnut
Produced by Tecno, 1961
Est €6,000 > 8,000



Italian Design
PIASA Rive Gauche
Paris | France
Exhibition: 10th April > 14th April 2014
Sale: 15th April 2014

In the 1980s London fell in love with design. It was cool to kit out your home with slick and beautifully made contemporary Italian furniture and lighting from Zeev Aram and newly-established shops, such as Atrium, and The London Lighting Company. From its launch in 1983, the names of architects and designers Vico Magistretti, Achille Castiglioni, as well as that of Ettore Sotsass, figured regularly and prominently in the British magazine Blueprint. At about the same time, and although I and other like-minded Londoners spoke no Italian, we began subscribing to, and each month poring over, great-looking Italian architecture and design magazines. Domus was one, Abitare another – the latter art directed and edited by the legendary Italo Lupi (former art director of Domus) in which the work of the designers mentioned above would also feature, alongside that of Carlo Mollino, Gio Ponti (Domus’s founder) and Piero Fornasetti – each still relevant but more representative of an earlier era. However the list of lots in PIASA Rive Gauche’s forthcoming auction, reveals other important Italian figures, who are perhaps less familiar, or were lost in translation, and also includes anonymous pieces.

After training as an architect and designer, Osvaldo Borsani (1911 >1985), see image top, joined the family furniture-making business Atelier Varedo (later Arredamento Borsani). Very prolific as a designer of storage furniture and seating, in 1953 with his brother Fulgencio, Osvaldo founded the technology based company, Tecno, which still exists and is a well-known producer of innovative furniture for offices and public buildings.

Unknown designer
Sofa in wool and brass, c 1950
Est €18,000 > 25,000

Ico Parisi
Suite of six chairs
in painted wood
and leatherette
c 1955
Est €6,000 > 9,000

Ico Parisi’s (1916 > 1996) style epitomised the modern Italian look of the 1950s. Trained as architect, he spent time in the 1930s as a film-maker and went on to design everything from interiors to jewellery, sometimes working with his wife, Luisa, a former student of Gio Ponti.

Pucci de Rossi
Rocking chair
in steel, prototype, 2001
Est €10,000 > 15,000

Born in Verona, Italy, artist, sculptor and designer, de Rossi (1947 > 2013) lived and worked in Paris from 1979. Post-modern by nature, rather than producing useful functional objects and furniture, he sought to imbue his creations with imagination, humour and irony.

BBPR
Trolley in metal and wood
One-off piece, designed for a
Milanese apartment, 1959
Est €4,000 > 6,000

Set up in Milan in 1932, BBPR was a studio of modern movement architects, planners and designers, composed of Gian Luigi Banfi, Ludovico Barbiato di Belgiojoso, Enrico Peressutti and Ernesto Nathan Rogers, who were responsible for the post World War II reconstruction of the city. They produced chair designs for Arflex – now back in production – and BBPR’s Olivetti showroom on Fifth Avenue, New York City (1954), is regarded as among the most innovative small-scale projects of the period.

Pierre Cardin
Table lamp in metal and glass
Produced by Venini c1970
Est €3,000 > 4,000

Significantly, because the Italian approach to production of furniture and lighting has always been crafts-based – which attracted designers from around the world to produce work for or with Italian companies – the PIASA Rive Gauche Italian Design sale features pieces by non-Italians, including, appropriately – it taking place in Paris – Frenchman Pierre Cardin (1922 >), who happens to have been born in Italy.


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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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