Posts Tagged ‘Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt’

Art | Djurberg & Berg’s Stop-motion Journey

Friday, February 8th, 2019

We Are Not Two
We Are One
, 2008

Stop-motion animation
video + music, 5:33 mins



Djurberg & Berg
A Journey Through
Mud and Confusion with
Small Glimpses of Air

Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
28 February > 26 May 2019



Its-the-Mother, 2008
Stop-motion animation
video + music, 6:00 mins



In the 1950s, American artist, Robert Breer, invited the ageing Marcel Duchamp (1887 > 1968) to his Paris studio. Duchamp’s first reaction to the abstract, animated films Breer showed him was, ‘Very nice, but don’t you think they’re a bit too fast?’

Swedish Contemporary artist Nathalie Djurberg uses the same stop-motion technique as Breer (1926 > 2011). Slow and incredibly laborious, it involves the production of multiple still images that, when run together, create the illusion of movement. But, while Breer’s objective was the least possible feeling of continuity, Djurberg produces dreamlike realities that have the appearance of live-action movies.

The Experiment at
Moderna Museet 2018,
installation view
Photo Åsa Lundén /
Moderna Museet



Djurberg first became known as an artist/filmmaker in 2003. She met fellow-Swede and experimental sound producer Hans Berg the following year; they have since worked together as a duo. Berg’s soundscapes add their own dimension to the intense scenes which Djurberg conjures up, constructs, lights and photographs.

As a student at Malmö Academy, which had no animation course, Djurberg went through a period during which she started to play around with photographing her sculptures and began to question whether what she was producing was art. Her overwhelming compulsion to make it for its own sake would provide the impetus for her to proceed. Sensitive and thoughtful, despite the erotic – even pornographic – content of some of the pair’s work, Djurberg insists that she is non-confrontational; her dearest wish is not to provoke. She relates strongly to the characters she creates, who, ‘may express different characteristics, and oscillate between different emotional states, but are all the same person’.

Dark-Side-of-the-Moon, 2017
Stop-motion animation
video + music, 6:40 mins



Open Window, 2011
Stop-motion animation

video + music, 5:54 mins



By contrast, cool and unemotional, Berg comes across as a total geek. His music is not a post-production addition, however; it is made simultaneously with Djurberg’s creation of sets and her sculptural figures, and with the animation process. Berg also composes techno music, which he performs in live concerts. The techno music, he says, intermingles with his film and animation work and vice-versa. He loves the idea of fusing the two, which he sees as an entirely new approach to creativity.

While, in visual terms, Djurberg and Berg’s creations may have something in common with British animator Nick Park’s stop-motion films featuring Wallis & Gromit, they form part of the multi-faceted genre of kinetic art that includes works as diverse as Alexander Calder’s Mobiles and Bridget Riley’s op-art, as well as Breer’s films. Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel (1913) sculpture – the first fine art that moved – was almost certainly influenced by early cinema.

A Journey Through Mud and Confusion with Small Glimpses of Air – the title is Djurberg’s description of her and Berg’s journey so far – at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt was first shown in 2018 at Moderna Museet, Stockholm. The exhibition includes some forty video and sound works from the past two decades. Early works such as My Name is Mud (2003) and Tiger Licking Girl’s Butt (2004) will be screened alongside large-format installations, including The Parade (2011), The Potato (2008) and The Experiment (2009). Their more recent productions: One Need Not Be a House, The Brain Has Corridors (2018) and Dark Side of the Moon (2017), will be on show together with numerous sculptures and the duo’s first virtual-reality work It Will End in Stars (2018).

All works by Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg.
All images © Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018


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Art | Call of the Wild

Friday, October 19th, 2018

Ana Mendieta, Bird
Transformation
, 1972

Colour photograph,
Vintage print.
Louisiana Museum
of Modern Art,
Denmark. © Estate
of Ana
Mendieta
Collection, LLC.
Courtesy Galerie
Lelong & Co New York.
Photo Poul Buchard /
Brøndum & Co



Wilderness
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
1 November 2018 >
3 February 2019



Thomas Struth,
Paradise 21
Yuquehy/Brazil, 2001
© Thomas Struth



Should the haze now suddenly clear, the figure gazing out into the abyss in Caspar David Friedrich’s Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog (c1818) might well be met with, not the sublime wilderness he has been seeking, but a conservation area. Devoid of industry, the vista, would very likely be marred by pylons and old quarry workings, and crisscrossed by access roads; there might be a dam with an enormous lake behind it; hikers in brightly-coloured jackets threading their way along a track far below, while buzzing around overhead, an inquisitive drone records every detail of the valley.



Gerhard Richter,
Tiger, 1965
Oil on canvas.
Museum Morsbroich.
© Gerhard Richter 2018



Georgia O’Keeffe,
From the Plains ll, 1954
Oil on canvas.
Museo Thyssen-
Bornemisza



Heinz Mack during
shooting of the film
Tele-Mack, in the
Tunisian desert, 1968.
Photo E Braun /
Archiv Mack



Wildernesses, in the original, geographical sense – locations that deny human access and in which raw nature is left to its own devices – have become rare and are becoming rarer. But, as a western, cultural concept, wilderness is also representative of the ethos of the free spirit, of an alternative philosophical model at odds with accepted values of culture, domestication and civilisation. In the spirit of the Romantic period, and following Friedrich and others’ lead, artists have continued to explore wilderness from both these perspectives.



Lin May Saeed,
The Liberation of
Animals from
their Cages XVII /
Olifant Gate, 2016
Tool steel and
lacquer. Courtesy
Jacky Strenz, Nicolas
Krupp, the artist.
Photo Wolfgang Günzel



Tracing the connections between wilderness and art, the exhibition Wilderness at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt brings together over 100 20th and 21st century paintings, photographs, graphics, video and sound works, sculptures, and installations by some 35 international artists, including Julian Charrière, Ian Cheng, Marcus Coates, Tacita Dean, Mark Dion, Jean Dubuffet, Max Ernst, Camille Henrot, Asger Jorn, Per Kirkeby, Joachim Koester, Ana Mendieta, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, Henri Rousseau, and Carleton E Watkins.

All images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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Art | Power to the Artists

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018

Adelita Husni-Bey,
The Sleepers, 2012
Oil on canvas
© The artist, courtesy
Galleria Laveronica,
Modica



Power to the People
Political Art Now
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
21 March > 27 May 2018



Phyllida Barlow,
Untitled: 100 banners,
2015, 2015
Lumber, plywood, tape,
wadding, fabric, paint,
sand, and plastic
© The artist, courtesy
Hauser & Wirth,
Photo Stefan Altenburger



This show doesn’t shout; it speaks a powerful, sophisticated language appropriate to our age. As we near the second decade of the 21st century, when democracy is facing critical challenges, contemporary artists are reacting by presenting us with an array of less in-your-face, more thoughtful works than those produced in the genre of political art by previous generations.

Halil Altındere,
Ballerinas and Police, 2017
Full HD Video
© The artist, courtesy
the artist and
Pilot Galeri, Istanbul



Edgar Leciejewski,
A Circle Full of Ecstasy
(detail), 2016
77 colour photographs.
Courtesy the artist



Julius von Bismarck,
Figuration #5 (May Day
Riot Police), 2009
Inkjet print
© The artist, courtesy
Alexander Levy, Berlin;
Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf



Just as supporters of democracy are having to change tack in order to deal effectively with the existential threat they are facing, artists have taken on board the rise of populist leaders, of fake news, of totalitarian propaganda, and of neoliberalism, and have adapted their approach.

Mark Flood,
5000 Likes, 2015 / 16
Spray paint on canvas,
(4,344 parts)
© The artist, courtesy
Peres Projects, Berlin,
Photo Matthias Kolb



Osman Bozkurt,
Marks of Democracy /
Portraits of the Voters, 2002
10 C-prints
Deutsche Bank Collection
© The artist



Ricarda Roggan,
Triptychon (Chair, Table
and Partition), 2001
C-Print (detail)
© The artist, courtesy
Galerie Eigen +
Art Leipzig / Berlin



Neither a single group nor an organised movement, the clutch of international artists whose work is included in Power to the People: Political Art Now at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt nevertheless gel into a single, purposeful force to be reckoned with.

Images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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Art | Deconstructing the Diorama

Friday, September 29th, 2017

Richard Barnes,
Man with Buffalo, 2007
Inkjet print
137.2 x 167.7cm
© Richard Barnes



Diorama
Inventing Illusion
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
6 October > 21 January 2018



Hiroshi Sugimoto,
Earliest Human Relatives, 1994
Silver gelatin print
42.3 × 54.3 cm
© The artist
Courtesy Sugimoto Studio



Contemporary artists such as Jeff Wall, Isa Genzken, and Hiroshi Sugimoto have dusted off the long redundant diorama format and updated it. Examples of their visions of how aspects of our culture can be re-staged via the revived medium, have been gathered together with that of many others, for new major exhibition in Germany highlighting the stories behind the development of this form of presentation, alongside a chronology of events that took place in parallel to it.

Mark Dion,
Paris Streetscape, 2017
Diverse materials
180 x 250 x150 cm
Courtesy Mark Dion /
Galerie in Situ
– Fabienne Leclerc, Paris.
Photo Aurélien Mole



Redolent of museum visits on rainy Sundays in our youth, their subject matter often anthropological, dioramas were intended to transport us to another time and place. The time was often hundreds, thousands or even millions of years ago; the place was conjured up in painted papier-mâché and invisibly joined to a painted backdrop. While it sometimes references the past, and employs many of the established techniques – albeit with a technological twist – the new work is imbued with irony and even humour, and the main emphasis is on the here and now.

Jean Paul Favand,
Naguère Daguerre 1, 2012
Digital light installation
with 19th Century canvas
270 x 410 cm
Musée des Arts Forains
© Jean Paul Favand
Photo Jean Mulatier



The museum scenes were invariably miniaturised and usually viewed through a peephole: turning the scale on its head, Jeff Wall places a giant-sized ageing, nude, female figure in a labyrinthine modern museum interior. In Richard BarnesMan with Buffalo, a curious buffalo approaches the set-builder. For his life-sized Paris Streetscape, Mark Dion adopts a deconstructed approach, cramming the diverse elements inside an internally illuminated glass-fronted box set on wheels.

Jeff Wall, The Giant, 1992
Lightbox with transparent
photography
39 x 48 x 13 cm,
Private collection
© Jeff Wall



Jean Paul Favand’s Naguère Daguerre (2012), which relies on two restored canvases from a nineteenth-century mechanical theatre references Louis Daguerre – inventor of the daguerreotype photographic process in the 1830s, and one of the fathers of photography – who was involved, in the early 1820s, in developing the first diorama theatre as a walk-in, optical-mechanical playhouse in Paris.

Diorama Inventing Illusion at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is the first comprehensive examination of the diorama.

All images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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Exhibition | Comic Strip Originals

Friday, June 24th, 2016

Charles Forbell, Naughty Pete,
The New York Herald, 23 October, 1913
Private collection



Pioneers of the Comic Strip
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
Until 18 September 2016



Lyonel Feininger, The Kin-der-Kids,
Sunday page, Chicago Tribune, 29 April 1906
Collection Achim Moeller, New York,
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016



It was the mass-produced, throwaway quality of comic book art that first attracted the interest of pop artists in the 1950s, who set about reproducing carefully selected details from them as large paintings. In consequence, wider attention was drawn toward the exceptional qualities of the original source of this inspiration: the newspaper comic strip. Countless millions of these were printed, and many more produced, but few from the trailblazing, early years have survived.

Cliff Sterrett, Polly and Her Pals, detail
13 November 1927
Private collection



Frank King, Gasoline Alley,
The Denver Post, 24 August, 1930
Private collection,
© Estate of Frank King



Although the format had existed in Britain since the early 1880s – Ally Sloper’s Half Holiday, first published on 3 May 1884 is regarded as the first comic strip magazine to feature a recurring character – comic strips first began to appear in American newspapers in 1897, immediately captivating the middle and working classes, as well as fascinating newly arrived immigrants. Their success there in the early 20th century was integral to the meteoric rise of newspapers as mass media that, due to the development of high-performance printing presses and decreasing paper costs, became affordable for all US citizens.

Comic strips would gain such importance that the growth or decline of a newspaper became dependent on their popularity, and they became tactical weapons in the war between American media barons, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst.

Winsor McCay, Little Nemo in Slumberland,
The New York Herald, 23 September, 1906
Private collection



Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt’s new exhibition, Pioneers of the Comic Strip, presents around 230 rare examples produced between 1905 and the 1940s, including original drawings, and features six outstanding, primarily American illustrators, who shaped the genre’s early history: Winsor McCay, Lyonel Feininger, Charles Forbell, Cliff Sterrett, George Herriman, and Frank King.

All images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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Art | Self-Portraiture Without the Self

Friday, February 26th, 2016

Mark Leckey, Leckey Legs, 2014
3D Photopolymer print
Courtesy Galerie Buchholz,
Köln/Berlin/New York
Photo Sven Laurentt



Me / Ich
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
10 March > 19 May 2016



Erwin Wurm, Selbstporträt
als Essiggurkerl
, 2010

Acrylic, acrylic lacquer,
lacquered wooden pedestals,
36-piece installation
Photo Museum der Moderne Salzburg
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016



Eberhard Havekost, Hotel, 2003 (2)
Inkjet on paper, framed Edition of 5
Courtesy Galerie Gebr Lehmann
Photo Werner Lieberknecht



In September 2014, The Guardian published their Top 10 Self-portraits in Art. Of the one hundred or so self-portraits Rembrandt van Rijn produced during his lifetime, including around fifty paintings, thirty-two etchings and seven drawings, just two were selected. The list, which was biased towards British artists included Lucian Freud’s Reflection With Two Children (Self-Portrait) (1965) and Self-Portrait With Charlie (1995) by David Hockney. Women artists were represented by, among others, Artemisia Gentileschi’s Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting (1638-39), and Tracey Emin’s I’ve Got It All (2000). In the writer’s opinion, Hockney ‘paints the ideal of honest observation’ and Picasso’s self-portraits are more to do with self-examination than an invitation to you to examine him too closely. Interestingly, and unusual for her, Untitled Film Still #48 (1979) by Cindy Sherman is the only one of the ten which doesn’t show the artist’s face.

Jürgen Klauke, Toter Fotograf, 1988/93
2-part photograph on baryta paper,
Courtesy Galerie Elisabeth & Klaus Thoman,
Innsbruck/Wien & the artist
Photo Jürgen Klauke
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016



Jun Ahn, Self-Portrait (Seoul), 2008/2014
Archival pigment print
© Jun Ahn, Courtesy Christophe Guye Galerie



A forthcoming exhibition in Germany will explore the contemporary art concept of ’self-portraiture without the self’ – or at least, for the most part, without the face. Among those artists included using photography as their medium, who have determined that body parts alone will suffice, Wolfgang Tillmans chooses to show only his knee, while Eberhard Havekost’s contribution is a detail of a hotel room interior with the toes of the artist’s right foot poking up into it; Friederike Pezold’s, Brustwerk, 1973, is a six-part polyptych in which her hands manipulate her naked breasts. In typically entertaining fashion, discarding his flesh and blood entirely and replacing it with a pickled vegetable, for his installation Selbstporträt als Essiggurkerl, 2010, sculptor Erwin Wurm portrays himself as a series of 36 gherkins of various sizes, each placed vertically on a sort of cityscape of white plinths. Showing no actual paintings, Ryan Gander displays the palettes he allegedly used during the production of his self-portrait/s.

Thorsten Brinkmann, Brinkmann, 2006
Carton, Sneaker, plastic legs and jeans of the artist,
Courtesy Teutloff Museum eV
Photo Thorsten Brinkmann
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016



In the face of the selfie’s universal democratisation of the self-portrait, are contemporary artists beating a retreat into the comparative safety of an arcane anonymity? Who’s to say? Featuring 40 works by international artists such as Joseph Beuys, Sarah Lucas, Nam June Paik, Rosemarie Trockel, and Gillian Wearing, Me/Ich, the forthcoming exhibition at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, will probably throw up more questions than it does answers.

All images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier

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Art | Women Artists Kick up a Storm in Frankfurt

Friday, October 30th, 2015

Maria Uhden, Four Nudes,
Woodcut, reproduced in Der Sturm, 1915

Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg,
Frankfurt am Main



Storm Women
Women Artists of the Avant-Garde in Berlin 1910 > 1932
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
30 October 2015 > 7 February 2016



Lavinia Schulz
Toboggan Woman, original, c 1924
Linen, papier mâché, wire, leather
© Photo Museum für Kunst
und Gewerbe Hamburg



One man, Herwarth Walden, made certain that women’s early 20th century avant-garde art got the exposure it deserved. Despite his efforts, however, many of them and much of their work vanished into obscurity. Most of us are familiar with their work or have at least heard of Sonia Delaunay, Natalja Goncharova and Gabriele Münter, but such names as Alexandra Exter, Else Lasker-Schüler, Marianne von Werefkin, Marthe Donas, Jacoba van Heemskerck, Hilla von Rebay, Lavinia Schulz, and Maria Uhden probably ring few bells. A new exhibition in Frankfurt, for the first time ever, brings together work by 18 of the 30 female artists, representing expressionism, cubism, futurism, constructivism and the new objectivity, which Walden promoted, and aims to set the record straight.

Walden wasn’t exclusively concerned with female artists, indeed he began by publishing woodcuts by, mostly by male, expressionist, Die Brucke (The Bridge) and Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) artists, Oskar Kokoschka, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Emil Nolde, and Max Pechstein amongst them, via the mass-produced and inexpensive Der Sturm / The Storm periodical, which he established in Berlin in 1910. It ran as a weekly up until in 1914 then changed to monthly publication, becoming a quarterly in 1924, before ceasing publication in 1932, when Walden, fleeing the Nazis emigrated to the USSR.

Composed of friends with similar interests, the international network Walden was eventually to develop served as a forum for intense discussion on the buzzing ideas, theories, and concepts of the avant-garde. In Berlin, the Sturm evening events, the Sturm academy he founded, the Sturm theatre and bookshop, as well as the occasional balls and a cabaret, offered those who were interested a broad variety of opportunities to gain access to the diverse artistic currents and trends from 1910 to until the early thirties.

To celebrate Der Sturm’s 100th issue in 1912, Walden opened Galerie der Sturm, with an exhibition of fauvist and Der Blaue Reiter work, soon followed by the Italian futurists. Particularly during in the years preceding the outbreak of World War I, Sturm played a crucial role in the development of a special relationship between Berlin and Paris, exhibiting work by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, as well as the Franco-German artist, Jean (aka Hans) Arp and Robert Delaunay. Walden showed Edvard Munch, Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky and Marc Chagall: Kurt Schwitters’ would have his first one-man exhibition at the Galerie Der Sturm, in 1920.

Gabriele Münter
Apples on Blue, 1908
Oil on cardboard
Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz
- Museum Gunzenhauser
Property of Stiftung Gunzenhauser,
Chemnitz VG Bild-Kunst,
Bonn 2015



Jacoba van Heemskerck
Houses in Suiderland, Drawing No 13, 1914
Ink on paper
Kunstmuseum Bern, Donation Nell Walden



Sigrid Hjertén
Woman with Fur and Red Hat, 1915
Oil on canvas
Private collection
Photo © per@myrehed.com



In the early decades of the 20th century, women artists were barely recognised by society and had no access to the academic training their male colleagues enjoyed. The subject of women in visual art was openly discussed in many publications during those years, but their claims to originality and creativity were generally brushed aside. The more broad-minded Herwarth Walden, however, claimed it was the individual work of art that was most important to him, regardless of whether the maker was a man or a woman. Sharp and always on the lookout for the new and the cutting edge, he disregarded the typical prejudices of the time and gave women artists their first big chance. Roughly one fifth of the Sturm gallery artists were female. A disparate group, their life stories, personal circumstances, and critical reception varied enormously, as did their styles and approach to creating art.

The expressionist painter Gabrielle Münter (1877 > 1962), who would gain only moderate success throughout her life, was honoured with a posthumous major retrospective exhibition, celebrating the artistic achievements of her early career, at London’s prestigious Courtauld Gallery in 2005, and has since become more widely appreciated. During the pre-World War I years, she lived with Wassily Kandinsky in Mürnau (Bavaria), where their home became an important meeting place for the highly-influential Der Blaue Reiter group. In 1913, Münther had an exhibition of eighty-four paintings at the Sturm, Walden arranging for some of the work to be shown later at galleries in Munich, Copenhagen, Dresden, and Stuttgart.

Along with Münther, Maria Uhden and Nell Walden (Herwarth’s second wife, her predecessor, Else Lasker-Schüler was an artist and poet), Marianne von Werefkin (1860−1938) was one of the most frequently exhibited female artists at the Sturm. Walden, who was impressed by her passion for the concepts and forms of expression in modern art, shared many of her views and was responsible for introducing her work to a broader public throughout Germany and Europe. Dutch artist Jacoba van Heemskerck (1876−1923) was featured in ten solo shows at the gallery, and, with a total of twenty woodcuts, was represented more often than any other artist on the cover of Der Sturm.

Sonia Delaunay, Design B53, 1924
Gouache and pencil on paper
Private collection
Foto © Privatarchiv



Maria Uhden (1892−1918), some of whose woodcuts anticipate the 1980s work of the American graffiti artist Keith Haring, drew inspiration from historical prints and book illustrations that had been revived in the Almanach Der Blaue Reiter. Walden continued to show her works at his gallery and in touring exhibitions well after her premature death.

‘Sonia Delaunay is now rightly seen as a stronger and more complex artist than her husband, who died in 1941,’ wrote The Guardian in April this year, in a review of The EY Exhibition: Sonia Delaunay, her retrospective at Tate Modern, that had started life in 2014 at Paris’s Musée d’Art Moderne, for which over 400 works: paintings, wall decorations, gouaches, prints, fashion items and textiles, tracing her career from the early 20th century to the 1970s were assembled. Born Sonia Terk (1885 > 1979) into a well-to-do family in the Ukraine, she studied painting in Germany but travelled to Paris before settling there in 1905. Already under the influence of Gaugin and German expressionism, she encountered Picasso and by 1908 was exhibiting alongside him, Braque, Derain, and Dufy. By about 1912, in conjunction with her second husband, Robert, she was producing pioneering abstract work in a style that the French poet Guillaume Apollinaire was to christen Orphism. Coming to Paris in search of new work Herwarth Walden and Nell stayed with the Delaunays, returning to Berlin with many of their pieces of which twenty-one of Robert’s and twenty-five of Sonia’s were included in the Erster Deutscher Herbst Salon / First German Autumn Salon exhibition at the Sturm Gallery in 1913. In 1920, Walden presented a selection of Sonia’s works in a solo exhibition.

A friend of the Delaunays and also from the Ukraine, Alexandra Exter (1882−1949) served as a mediator between the East European and Western avant-garde circles in Paris, producing her own cubo-futurist style work in several different media. The Schirn is presenting her Female costume design for Aelita (a silent film that premiered in Berlin in 1924). In 1927, her unique cubist and constructivist marionettes, were given a solo show at the Sturm.

Storm Women: Women Artists of the Avant-Garde in Berlin 1910 > 1932, at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt honours each of the artists included with a separate room and features some 250 works.

All images courtesy Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt


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The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Exhibitions | Reminder: Don’t Miss These…

Saturday, August 1st, 2015

McDermott & McGough, Those Moments, 1955, 2010
Tricolour carbon print. Courtesy the artists and Cheim & Read, New York.
On show at The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, see below



The Blog team return next week.
Whether you’re staying at home or travelling,
here’s our selection of some of the best
of what’s on show this summer >>>



Doug Aitken, Sunset (black and white), 2011
Hand carved foam, epoxy with LED lights and hand silk-screened acrylic.
Courtesy the artist, 303 Gallery, New York, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich, Victoria Miro Gallery, London and Regen Projects, LA. Photo © Brian Forrest.
On show at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, see below



>>> Until 23 August 2015
Coop Himmelb(l)au
Frankfurt Lyon Dalian

DeutschesArchitekturmuseum (DAM)
Frankfurt | Germany
Vienna-based architectural practice with the long-winded name Coop Himme(l)blau Wolf D Prix & Partner, long-time player on the international architecture scene, founded in 1968 in response to the predominance of rectilinear grids, set out to liberate architecture from its functional confines by rendering space more dynamic and buildings gravity-defying. The exhibition presents three of the studio’s latest projects: the new European Central Bank building (2015) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the Musée des Confluences (2014) in Lyon, France, and the Dalian International Conference Centre in China (2012), see image below.

>>> Auction 28 Aug 2015
Japanese Whisky
Christie’s
Admiralty | Hong Kong
Featuring Hanyu Ichito’s Full Cards Series of 54 bottles of the spirit, each with beautifully-designed individual labels on a playing card theme, which are expected to sell for HK$1.8 m > 2.4 m / £150,000 > 200,000 / US$230,000 > 310,000.

>>> Until 28 August 2015
Joana Vasconcelos:
Material World

Phillips
(Selling exhibition)
London | UK

Forty works representing various periods of sculptor and installation artist Joana Vasconcelos’s career to date, coinciding with the publication of her monograph by Thames & Hudson.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Perfect Likeness:
Photography and Composition

The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles | USA

Having reached a point when everyone thinks he / she is a photographer, and where photography of every possible style and quality pervades every corner of our daily lives, this exhibition looks at the carefully composed images of fine art photographers such as Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, McDermott & McGough and Jeff Wall.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Design Derby:
The Netherlands – Belgium (1815 > 2015)

Museum Boijmans
Van Beuningen

Rotterdam | Netherlands

Like for like Dutch and Belgium design objects – from sumptuous and elegant Belgian art nouveau to the more austere Dutch version, and from the contemporary tours de force of Belgium design to the level-headed Dutch design of today – confront one other in friendly competition.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Fast Fashion
The Shadowy Side of Fashion

Museum für Kunst und
Gewerbe Hamburg

Hamburg | Germany
A critical glimpse behind the scenes of fashion – consumerism, economic interests and ecological issues – throwing light upon fashion and its victims; poverty and affluence; global and local effects; wages and profits; garments and chemicals; clothes and ecology; as well as new fibre technologies.

>>> Until 26 September 2015
Larry Bell 2D-3D:
Glass & Vapor

White Cube, Mason’s Yard
London | UK
Larry Bell (b 1939, Chicago) is a leading exponent of the California ‘Light and Space’ movement. The exhibition includes three early glass installations as well as collages on paper and new, kinetic Light Knot sculptures. To coincide with a major presentation of a Standing Wall installation of thirty-two, six foot square glass panels (c1989 >2014) currently on show at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, USA, at White Cube, Bell has installed 6 x 8 An Improvisation.

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Doug Aitken
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
Following on from his Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening extravaganza at London’s Barbican, The Shirn dedicates its entire exhibition space, inside and out, to the impressive work of American multimedia-artist Doug Aitken, in the most comprehensive solo presentation of his film, music, architecture, performance and sculpture in Germany and elsewhere to date, see image above

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Germaine Krull
A Photographer’s Journey

Jeu de Paume
Paris | France
The idea of the female career photographer – rather than dabbler or dilettante – didn’t properly materialise until free-spirited women such as Gertrude Krull (1897 > 1985) thrust herself headlong into the male-dominated mêlée in the 1920s.



One-sheet poster for Sullivan’s Travels, directed by Preston Sturges, 1941
Poster art direction by Maurice Kallis. Courtesy Sikelia Productions.
On show at MoMA in New York, see below

Dalian International Conference Centre, China, by
Coop Himmelb(l)au Wolf D Prix & Partner, in Vienna, Austria

Photo © Duccio Malagamba.
On show at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt, see above



>>> Until 27 September 2015
What is Luxury?
V&A
London | UK
The world’s biggest museum of the decorative arts and design has a permanent, historic collection of over 4.5 million objects. By definition it is a museum of things, many of which are extremely valuable and considered to be luxurious items. With over 100 objects, ‘From a diamond made from roadkill to a vending machine stocked with DNA, a golden crown for ecclesiastical use to traditional military tailoring, this exhibition addresses how luxury is made and understood in a physical, conceptual and cultural capacity.’

>>> Until September 30
Scorsese Collects [film posters]
Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
In celebration of director Martin Scorsese’s enduring commitment to the preservation of international film culture, MoMA presents 34 works from his collection, centred around a rare, billboard-size poster for the 1951 film Tales of Hoffmann. The exhibition will be accompanied by the film series Scorsese Screens throughout August.

>>> Until 4 October 2015
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires:
Grete Stern & Horacio Coppola

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
The first major exhibition of the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who, in the 1930s, established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic.

>>> Until 18 October 2015
The 80s. Figurative
Painting in West Germany

Städel Museum
Frankfurt | Germany
Shedding light on the new and dynamic figurative painting that developed in the 1980s almost simultaneously in Berlin, Hamburg and the Rhineland. Works by among many other artists, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, and Salomé.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture
for a Modern World

Tate Britain
London | UK
Retrospective of one of Britain’s greatest artists, Barbara Hepworth (1903 > 1975), one of the few women artists to achieve widespread recognition and international prominence, featuring many of her most significant sculptures in wood, stone and bronze alongside her rarely seen works that exemplified modernism from the 1920s onwards.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Gilbert & George:
The Early Years

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
‘It’s not a collaboration. . . We are two people, but one artist,’ say the inseparable British artists, Gilbert and George, who have been creating art together for almost fifty years. This exhibition focuses on their early years, from 1969 to 1975, when the art world around them was largely engaged in pop, minimal, and conceptual work, while the pair developed a wholly unique vision.

>>> Until 26 October 2015
Radikal Moderne Planen
und Bauen im Berlin
der Sechziger Jahre

/ Planning and Building
in Berlin in the 1960s

Berlinische Galerie
Berlin | Germany
Via 300 known works and recently rediscovered material representing 30 architects, planners, photographers and artists, this is the first detailed examination of a decade in architecture and urban planning that shaped a city divided not only by a wall, but also by political ideologies.

>>> Until 31 October 2015
Stone Fenoyl (1945 > 1987).
An Imaginary Geography.
A Documentary Record

Château de Tours
(in association with Jeu de Paume)
Tours | France

Famous for his ability to discover and nurture new photographers, and for his admiration of anonymous 19th century photographs, iconographer, curator, art buyer, gallery and Vu agency (now Viva) founder, Pierre de Fenoyl was the first director of France’s National Foundation Photography in 1976. Champion of the work of Brassai, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Duane Michals and André Kertész, alongside prints, documents, films and publications, this retrospective also shows the black and white landscape photography he created himself from 1984.

>>> Until 1 November 2015
Fotografia Futurista
Galleria Carla Sozzani
Milan | Italy
With over one hundred original photographs, representing the work of over thirty photographers, this exhibition demonstrates how, over a fifty-year period, the futurists took possession of the photographic language and used it as a medium to capture the pulse of early 20th century life. In so doing, they transformed photography into the dynamic, potent and multifaceted force it became in both art and commerce in the twentieth century.

>>> Until 31 January 2016
Shoes: Pleasure and Pain
V&A
London | UK
Exploring the euphoria and obsession they can inspire, more than 200 pairs of historic and contemporary shoes from the V&A’s unrivalled international collection, worn by or associated with high profile figures including Marilyn Monroe, Queen Victoria, Sarah Jessica Parker and the Hon Daphne Guinness are on display. Famous shoes, such as the ballet slippers designed for Moira Shearer in the 1948 film The Red Shoes, are exhibited alongside footwear by 70 named designers including Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Jimmy Choo and Miuccia Prada.



Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Exhibitions | This Summer, Don’t Miss These…

Friday, July 24th, 2015

McDermott & McGough, Those Moments, 1955, 2010
Tricolour carbon print. Courtesy the artists and Cheim & Read, New York.
On show at The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, see below



The Blog team is away.
Whether you stay at
home or go travelling,
h
ere’s our selection of
some of the best of what’s
on show this summer >>>



Doug Aitken, Sunset (black and white), 2011
Hand carved foam, epoxy with LED lights and hand silk-screened acrylic.
Courtesy the artist, 303 Gallery, New York, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich, Victoria Miro Gallery, London and Regen Projects, LA. Photo © Brian Forrest.
On show at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, see below



>>> Until 23 August 2015
Coop Himmelb(l)au
Frankfurt Lyon Dalian
DeutschesArchitekturmuseum (DAM)
Frankfurt | Germany
Vienna-based architectural practice with the long-winded name Coop Himme(l)blau Wolf D Prix & Partner, long-time player on the international architecture scene, founded in 1968 in response to the predominance of rectilinear grids, set out to liberate architecture from its functional confines by rendering space more dynamic and buildings gravity-defying. The exhibition presents three of the studio’s latest projects: the new European Central Bank building (2015) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the Musée des Confluences (2014) in Lyon, France, and the Dalian International Conference Centre in China (2012), see image below.

>>> Auction 28 Aug 2015
Japanese Whisky
Christie’s
Admiralty | Hong Kong
Featuring Hanyu Ichito’s Full Cards Series of 54 bottles of the spirit, each with beautifully-designed individual labels on a playing card theme, which are expected to sell for HK$1.8 m > 2.4 m / £150,000 > 200,000 / US$230,000 > 310,000.

>>> Until 28 August 2015
Joana Vasconcelos:
Material World
Phillips
(Selling exhibition)
London | UK
Forty works representing various periods of sculptor and installation artist Joana Vasconcelos’s career to date, coinciding with the publication of her monograph by Thames & Hudson.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Perfect Likeness:
Photography and
Composition
The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles | USA

Having reached a point when everyone thinks he / she is a photographer, and where photography of every possible style and quality pervades every corner of our daily lives, this exhibition looks at the carefully composed images of fine art photographers such as Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, McDermott & McGough and Jeff Wall.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Design Derby:
The Netherlands – Belgium (1815 > 2015)
Museum Boijmans
Van Beuningen
Rotterdam | Netherlands

Like for like Dutch and Belgium design objects – from sumptuous and elegant Belgian art nouveau to the more austere Dutch version, and from the contemporary tours de force of Belgium design to the level-headed Dutch design of today – confront one other in friendly competition.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Fast Fashion
The Shadowy Side of Fashion
Museum für Kunst und
Gewerbe Hamburg

Hamburg | Germany
A critical glimpse behind the scenes of fashion – consumerism, economic interests and ecological issues – throwing light upon fashion and its victims; poverty and affluence; global and local effects; wages and profits; garments and chemicals; clothes and ecology; as well as new fibre technologies.

>>> Until 26 September 2015
Larry Bell 2D-3D:
Glass & Vapor

White Cube, Mason’s Yard
London | UK
Larry Bell (b 1939, Chicago) is a leading exponent of the California ‘Light and Space’ movement. The exhibition includes three early glass installations as well as collages on paper and new, kinetic Light Knot sculptures. To coincide with a major presentation of a Standing Wall installation of thirty-two, six foot square glass panels (c1989 >2014) currently on show at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, USA, at White Cube, Bell has installed 6 x 8 An Improvisation.

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Doug Aitken
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
Following on from his Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening extravaganza at London’s Barbican, The Shirn dedicates its entire exhibition space, inside and out, to the impressive work of American multimedia-artist Doug Aitken, in the most comprehensive solo presentation of his film, music, architecture, performance and sculpture in Germany and elsewhere to date, see image above

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Germaine Krull
A Photographer’s Journey
Jeu de Paume
Paris | France
The idea of the female career photographer – rather than dabbler or dilettante – didn’t properly materialise until free-spirited women such as Gertrude Krull (1897 > 1985) thrust herself headlong into the male-dominated mêlée in the 1920s.



One-sheet poster for Sullivan’s Travels, directed by Preston Sturges, 1941
Poster art direction by Maurice Kallis. Courtesy Sikelia Productions.
On show at MoMA in New York, see below

Dalian International Conference Centre, China, by
Coop Himmelb(l)au Wolf D Prix & Partner, in Vienna, Austria
Photo © Duccio Malagamba.
On show at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt, see above



>>> Until 27 September 2015
What is Luxury?
V&A
London | UK
The world’s biggest museum of the decorative arts and design has a permanent, historic collection of over 4.5 million objects. By definition it is a museum of things, many of which are extremely valuable and considered to be luxurious items. With over 100 objects, ‘From a diamond made from roadkill to a vending machine stocked with DNA, a golden crown for ecclesiastical use to traditional military tailoring, this exhibition addresses how luxury is made and understood in a physical, conceptual and cultural capacity.’

>>> Until September 30
Scorsese Collects [film posters]
Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
In celebration of director Martin Scorsese’s enduring commitment to the preservation of international film culture, MoMA presents 34 works from his collection, centred around a rare, billboard-size poster for the 1951 film Tales of Hoffmann. The exhibition will be accompanied by the film series Scorsese Screens throughout August.

>>> Until 4 October 2015
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires:
Grete Stern & Horacio Coppola

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
The first major exhibition of the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who, in the 1930s, established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic.

>>> Until 18 October 2015
The 80s. Figurative
Painting in West Germany

Städel Museum
Frankfurt | Germany
Shedding light on the new and dynamic figurative painting that developed in the 1980s almost simultaneously in Berlin, Hamburg and the Rhineland. Works by among many other artists, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, and Salomé.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture
for a Modern World

Tate Britain
London | UK
Retrospective of one of Britain’s greatest artists, Barbara Hepworth (1903 > 1975), one of the few women artists to achieve widespread recognition and international prominence, featuring many of her most significant sculptures in wood, stone and bronze alongside her rarely seen works that exemplified modernism from the 1920s onwards.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Gilbert & George:
The Early Years

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
‘It’s not a collaboration. . . We are two people, but one artist,’ say the inseparable British artists, Gilbert and George, who have been creating art together for almost fifty years. This exhibition focuses on their early years, from 1969 to 1975, when the art world around them was largely engaged in pop, minimal, and conceptual work, while the pair developed a wholly unique vision.

>>> Until 26 October 2015
Radikal Moderne Planen
und Bauen im Berlin
der Sechziger Jahre
/
Planning and Building
in Berlin in the 1960s

Berlinische Galerie
Berlin | Germany
Via 300 known works and recently rediscovered material representing 30 architects, planners, photographers and artists, this is the first detailed examination of a decade in architecture and urban planning that shaped a city divided not only by a wall, but also by political ideologies.

>>> Until 31 October 2015
Stone Fenoyl (1945 > 1987).
An Imaginary Geography.
A Documentary Record
Château de Tours
(in association with Jeu de Paume)
Tours | France
Famous for his ability to discover and nurture new photographers, and for his admiration of anonymous 19th century photographs, iconographer, curator, art buyer, gallery and Vu agency (now Viva) founder, Pierre de Fenoyl was the first director of France’s National Foundation Photography in 1976. Champion of the work of Brassai, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Duane Michals and André Kertész, alongside prints, documents, films and publications, this retrospective also shows the black and white landscape photography he created himself from 1984.

>>> Until 1 November 2015
Fotografia Futurista
Galleria Carla Sozzani
Milan | Italy
With over one hundred original photographs, representing the work of over thirty photographers, this exhibition demonstrates how, over a fifty-year period, the futurists took possession of the photographic language and used it as a medium to capture the pulse of early 20th century life. In so doing, they transformed photography into the dynamic, potent and multifaceted force it became in both art and commerce in the twentieth century.

>>> Until 31 January 2016
Shoes: Pleasure and Pain
V&A
London | UK
Exploring the euphoria and obsession they can inspire, more than 200 pairs of historic and contemporary shoes from the V&A’s unrivalled international collection, worn by or associated with high profile figures including Marilyn Monroe, Queen Victoria, Sarah Jessica Parker and the Hon Daphne Guinness are on display. Famous shoes, such as the ballet slippers designed for Moira Shearer in the 1948 film The Red Shoes, are exhibited alongside footwear by 70 named designers including Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Jimmy Choo and Miuccia Prada.


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Art | Events Around the Eclipse of Capitalism

Friday, March 20th, 2015

OX, Untitled, 2013
Besançon 2013, Festival Bien Urbain Besançon



OX, Untitled, 2013
Besançon 2013, Festival Bien Urbain Besançon

Acrylic on petrol station



OX Public Posters
Edited by Andreas Ulrich
International Neighborhood Verlag

Text in German + English + French
308 pp, landscape, hardback
Available now

+

Rirkrit Tiravanija.
Berlin Billboards
On view at the following sites:
Messedamm 22, Berlin-Charlottenburg,
Prinzenstrasse 81, Berlin-Kreuzberg,
Wilhelmstrasse 111, Berlin-Tiergarten,
Leipziger Strasse 54, Berlin-Mitte,
Berlin | Germany

Until 18 April 2015

+

Art for All.
Multiples, graphics,
and political campaigns
from the Staeck Collection
Akademie der Künste
Berlin | Germany
Until 7 June 2015

+

Poetry of the Metropolis.
The Affichistes
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany

Until 25 May 2015

+

Peter Liversidge:
Notes on Protesting
Whitechapel Gallery
London | UK

Until 14 June 2014



OX, Untitled, 2004, Paris



OX, Untitled, 2009, Champagne-sur-Seine



OX, Untitled, 2008, Paris



OX, Untitled, 2005, Bagnolet



OX
OX (French, b 1963) finds a lot of graffiti tantamount to visual pollution, ‘plain ugly… badly placed, or just boring.’ He calls himself a painter, but says self-deprecatingly, ‘I am well aware that there is a difference between me and the master painters.

OX doesn’t like to talk much about his work. Nor does he title any of it. He prefers to let it speak for itself. ‘It isn’t interesting to watch me paint, either… I produce, I do colouring… watching me paint is very [tiring].’

OX’s medium is, for the most part, collage, albeit using paper he has first painted in his studio. A former member of the Paris-based 1980s art school guerilla collagist group Les Fréres Ripoulin, he and his associates were never certain whether gluing their work on to advertising billboards around Paris was illegal, but got an adrenalin rush from the idea that it might be. They even risked scribbling contact telephone numbers on their finished pieces and, never bothered by the police, were rung up by journalists and invited to exhibit at Paris’s recently-opened Agnes B gallery. However, after an unsuccessful New York show the group disintegrated in 1994.

OX used much of the next 10 years for quiet reflection. The work he began producing in 2004 – based around his cutting away all of the photographs on magazine pages but preserving the remaining fragments – was ‘like the opposite of pop art… Instead of using the most visible symbols of the visual commercial realm, I used only the outlines, the backgrounds, the most visually weak elements.’ For source material, he collected pictures from the discarded magazines he found in rubbish bins. These days he searches the internet for images to add to his archive, and increasingly uses Google Street View to find locations. Either the billboard itself gives rise to the idea, or its location.

OX, Untitled, 2009, Paris



OX, Untitled, 2013, Dammerie-les-lys



OX likes to take his time. After deciding on a site, he will observe it often for long periods and in different weather conditions, waiting sometimes several months, or even years, before choosing a billboard on which to execute the idea he has formulated. He likes the temporary nature of his ’signs’, which he documents by photographing them, and claims he is not attached to the originals that can be gone within a few days. However, he might return at a later date to revise a ’sign’, if it’s still there.

OX is prolific. Except for a few earlier examples, the photographs shown in the new book OX Public Posters, published by International Neighborhood Verlag and distributed by Gestalten, are selected from the three hundred or so paintings he has placed on public billboards around the world from 2004 to 2014. Those shown, together with many other images of his work can be found on OX’s Blog.

+ Rirkrit Tiravanija. Berlin Billboards
Inspired by economic theorist Jeremy Rifkin’s book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society: the Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, Open Source: Art at the Eclipse of Capitalism is a series of connected events occurring at the Max Hetzler galleries in Berlin and Paris, plus a theatre performance at the New Theater in Berlin, as well as a lecture by Jeremy Rifkin at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, which will be followed by an interview with Rifkin by Hans Ulrich Obrist, to appear both online and in a forthcoming book based on the exhibition. The object of the series is to consider artworks made since 1990 to the present which reflect economic transition. Exhibitor Rirkrit Tiravanija (b Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1961) is a contemporary artist living between New York, Berlin, and Chiang Mai. In his video Ghost Reader, 2013, Tiravanija uses the manga character Annlee – who appears on the artist’s Berlin billboards – to explore the complex issues of copyright, identity, status and emotion in our rapidly changing society.

+ Art for All. Multiples, graphics, and political campaigns
Beginning in the 1960s, when artists sought independence from existing institutions, and wanted to create affordable art for as wide an audience as possible, the Art for All movement, which is still active today and has included international figures, such as Joseph Beuys, Christo, Sigmar Polke and Rosemarie Trockel, began producing multiples – original works of art reproduced in large quantities that circumvented the rules of traditional art, making it accessible to everyone. Art for All: Multiples, graphics, and political campaigns exhibition at the Akademie der Künste presents graphics, objects and art books from the Staeck Collection, by numerous artists working in a diverse variety of styles and aesthetic approaches, and offers insights into a non-conformist creative generation. During a period of profound social upheaval, these artists put their trust in the critical, enlightening and utopian powers of art, while permanently contributing to the shape of its formal language.

+ Poetry of the Metropolis. The Affichistes
Pioneers of new realism, early pop artists, street art trailblazers – on their rambles through postwar Paris, the artists who would become known as the Affichistes collected fragments of the weathered and tattered posters, they came across that were often peeling and several layers deep, carried them back to their studios and created original artworks from them, in doing so elevating this ubiquitous aspect of everyday urban life to the status of a fine art. Poetry of the Metropolis: The Affichistes, is an extensive exhibition at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, which shines a light on the special role of the subversive and poetic Affichistes within the avant-garde of the 1950s and1960s.

+ Peter Liversidge: Notes on Protesting
Inspired by demonstration and protest, British artist Peter Liversidge (b1973) worked closely with sixty London schoolchildren, to produce a performance staged at the Whitechapel Gallery, on May Day (01 May 2014). Creating songs, choreography, banners and placards, they expressed their views on everything from ‘No More Homework’ to ‘Less trucks and cars. More chocolate bars!’ Peter Liversidge: Notes on Protesting at the Whitechapel Gallery includes a film of the performance, alongside documentation of the workshops and rehearsals.

All images from OX Public Posters / Affichage Libre / Public Posters
All images courtesy Gestalten
All images © OX and Wildsmile Studios, Dresden





Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



Share this post
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