Posts Tagged ‘Steven Kasher Gallery’

Photography | Africa Shines Through

Friday, March 30th, 2018

Zarita Zevallos
Imperium 2, 2017
Archival pigment print



Refraction: New Photography
of Africa and its Diaspora
Steven Kasher Gallery
NYC | USA
19 April 2 June 2018



Keyezua
Fortia (1), 2017
Giclée print on
Hanhemühle paper



Crack it. Smash it. Break it up into little pieces and scatter it. Glass will continue to refract rays of light that pass through it. This show sets out to demonstrate how cultural identity – in this case, African – reacts in a similar way.

Often ripped from their roots and transported many thousands of miles, or forced to flee wars and pogroms, Africans have seen their cultural identity subdued and trampled upon but never entirely transmuted.

Shawn Theodore
All I Ever Wanted Was
A Reason To Be
, 2018

Archival pigment print



Nona Faustine
Over Her Dead Body,
Tweed Courthouse,
Brooklyn, NY
, 2013

Archival pigment print



Stan Squirewell
Afrosaxson, 2017
Mixed media collage



Flying in the face of centuries of adversity, recent decades have seen the emergence of a new generation of photographers of African descent, based in many different locations across the globe, including Africa itself, with a rich diversity of approaches, determined to reclaim and to reassert their cultural heritage.

Eyerusalem Adugna Jirenga
The City of Saints VII, 2017
Digital archival print



Rendered entirely contemporary by its use of modern photography techniques, such as performative self-portraiture, collage, montage and digital manipulation, while their work – captured through fine quality glass camera lenses – makes bold references to traditional African values, rites and rituals, it is nevertheless undoubtedly characterised by the refractive process that African cultural identity has passed through.

Refraction: New Photography of Africa and its Diaspora at Steven Kasher Gallery presents the work of photographers born in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, living in Addis Ababa, Luanda, Paris, New York and beyond.

All images courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design, gardens and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Photography | 1968: Pop Goes the News

Friday, January 5th, 2018

2 February 1968
Viet Cong guerrilla
executed by
police chief
AP Wirephoto,
Photo Eddie Adams



Day by Day: 1968
Steven Kasher Gallery
New York City | USA
11 January > 24 February 2018



9 February 1968
Elvis and Priscilla
Presley with
their
newborn daughter

United Press
International, Inc



In February 1968 a prisoner, identified as a Vietcong officer, was presented to police chief Nguyen Ngoc Loan, who shot him dead. Eddie Adams’ photograph of the event was voted World Press Photo of the Year and earned him a Pulitzer Prize. The moment of the execution, seen by so many in their newspapers, became the moment Western opinion about the Vietnam war fundamentally shifted.

A leap year, 1968 lasted a day longer than most. But what did another day matter? Brimful with tumultuous events it was one of the most turbulent twelve month periods of the 20th century. New York’s Steven Kasher Gallery is marking its 50th anniversary with an exhibition of vintage black and white news agency photographed – one shot on each of its 366 momentous days. Resembling a series of pop art montages that might have been put together by Richard Hamilton or Andy Warhol, and accompanied by a soundtrack of 1968 pop songs, including bubble-gum and anti-war anthems, the images are arranged in tragic and comic, ironic and histrionic, utopian and dystopian juxtaposition.

The previous year had played host to the summer of love, the first successful human to human heart transplant was performed, the Concorde prototype was shown, Elvis Presley married Priscilla and The Beatles released the Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band album, but Israel’s fiercely fought Six-Day War against Egypt, Jordan, and Syria, anti-Vietnam War protests around the world, as well as race riots in America that destroyed parts of cities, most notably Detroit, were strong indicators of what was to follow.

4 June 1968
Senator Robert F
Kennedy on the floor
of the ambassador
Hotel shortly after

being shot

UPI Telephoto



9 August 1968
Sammy Davis Jr
and Peter
Lawford
in
Salt and Pepper

SP



21 August 1968
A Soviet tank moves
past Wenceslaus
statue in Prague after
USSR’s invasion
of Czechoslovakia

United Press
International, Inc



1968 began with Alexander Dubcek’s election to first secretary of the Czech Communist Party and his initiation of a programme of liberal reforms causing alarm in Moscow. By August Soviet tanks were rolling into Prague to restore Warsaw Pact discipline. Meanwhile, in February, the world got very excited about Elvis and Priscilla becoming parents to Lisa Marie. On April 5, as looters and roving arsonists wreaked havoc on the streets of Washington DC, Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated. Nine weeks later, Senator Robert Kennedy met the same fate. In May student riots had thrown the streets of Paris, which on the 31st teemed with 200,000 workers demonstrating against the government, into violent turmoil. Held in the aftermath, however, the French general election in June was won by Gaullists with 72% of the seats. In Northern Ireland Catholics were demanding equal rights with Protestants and the ensuing civil rights riots ushered in a state of emergency. Released that summer, Salt and Pepper starring Sammy Davis Jr and Peter Lawford as Swinging London nightclub owners was a box office sensation.

October 17, 1968
Tommie C Smith
and
John Carlos give
the
Black Power
salute at the medal
ceremony at the

Olympic Games in
Mexico City
Associated Press



December 28, 1968
The Beatles line
up behind a flag
Stephen Goldblat,
Camera Press London



As the counterculture era began in the US, on-going Civil Rights Movement, Free Speech Movement and Anti-Vietnam War protests flared up in cities such as Chicago and at the University of California’s Berkley campus. In October, two American athletes caused an uproar by giving the Black Power salute during the medal ceremony at the Olympic Games in Mexico City. In November, The Beatles released The Beatles, also known as The White Album – differences over its production and between the group members would lead to the band’s break-up. After nearly 11 months, North Korea, which had captured the US spy ship Pueblo in January, released the 83-man crew in December.

Day by Day: 1968 at Steven Kasher Gallery is displayed in calendar format – each group encompassing the images appertaining to one month of the year.

All images courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design, gardens and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Exhibitions | Olivia Locher Fights Back

Friday, September 8th, 2017

I Fought the Law (Ohio), 2014
In Ohio it’s illegal to disrobe in front of a man’s portrait



Olivia Locher: I Fought the Law
Steven Kasher Gallery
New York City | USA
14 September > 21 October 2017



I Fought the Law (Nevada), 2016
In Nevada it’s illegal to put an American flag on a bar of soap



While it may seem reasonable for Massachusetts to impose a ban on upskirt photos or for a man to be seen to be sexually aroused in public, why has a small town in Texas barred children from wearing unusual haircuts? Why is riding a bike in a swimming pool illegal in California? And, why is it against the law in Kansas to serve wine in teacups?

I Fought the Law (Kentucky), 2016
In Kentucky it’s illegal for anyone to lick a toad



I Fought the Law (Pennsylvania), 2015
In Pennsylvania it’s illegal to tie a dollar bill to a string
and pull it away when someone tries to pick it up



Artist Olivia Locher, who scoured the statute books of all 50 states in America, discovering these peculiar eccentricities and many others, doesn’t have the answers to these questions, but has created a series of striking photographic images lampooning some of the hundreds of decisions, big and small, made every year by local and state lawmakers.

I Fought the Law (Hawaii), 2015
In Hawaii one isn’t allowed to place coins in one’s ears



But Locher, whose work has been exhibited internationally, including at Aperture Foundation / New York, Le Dictateur / Milan, and Fashion Space Gallery / London, and has appeared in numerous magazines such as the New York Times Magazine, W, Neon, and Interview hasn’t just done it for fun; sometimes confrontational, often amusing, her photographs are intended to raise serious points about politics and social conventions.

Olivia Locher: I Fought the Law at Steven Kasher Gallery is the artist’s first New York solo exhibition and marks the publication of her first monograph which bears the same title (Chronicle Books, September 2017).

All images by Olivia Locher, courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York.


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design, photography and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being made available to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Photography | A Paper that Dared to Tell the Truth

Friday, December 18th, 2015

Helen Levitt
‘Third Avenue, Upper East Side, Offers no Trees or Cliffs for Kids to Climb,
but Porch of Abandoned Building is Excellent Substitute’
July-August 1940



PM New York Daily: 1940 > 48
Steven Kasher Gallery
14 January 20 February 2015



Weegee
‘The Critic, Opening Night at the Metropolitan Opera’
November 22, 1943



PM is against people who push other people around. PM accepts no advertising. PM belongs to no political party. PM is absolutely free and uncensored. PM’s sole source of income is its readers – to whom it alone is responsible. PM is one newspaper that can and dares to tell the truth.’ Making itself loud and clear in its first issue of June 18, 1940 New York’s progressive PM Daily – together with the Sunday version, PM Weekly – whose territory was politics, crime, war, labour, and celebrating the everyday lives of ordinary people, would become a platform for cutting edge photojournalism and an instrument for socially progressive thought.

Unknown photographer
‘Adam Clayton Powell at the Negro Freedom Rally, Madison Square Garden’
June 26, 1944



Max Peter Haas
‘Heroic Taxi Driver, Leonard Weisberg, Lying Dead at
Deadly ‘Mad Dog’ Shoot-Out in Manhattan’

April
1941



Gene Badger
‘On May 13 The Day, Yiddish Newspaper, Where 42 Employees Are On Strike’
May 1941



At a time when most New York publications were staunchly conservative, PM was ‘a fighting liberal crusader’, whose bold mission attracted important writers such as Ernest Hemingway, Dashiell Hammett, and Dorothy Parker, as well as future Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, Tip O’Neill. The editorial staff ardently supported US intervention against Hitler, took stands against racial and religious discrimination, and fought for the rights of labour unions.

Margaret Bourke-White
‘Men Searched the Job Boards on Sixth Avenue, as Unemployment is Rising Again’
June 1940



Closing on June 22, 1948, the legendary publication, whose roster of staff and freelance photographers included, among others, Weegee, Helen Levitt and Margaret Bourke-White, had a lifespan of almost exactly eight years.

PM New York Daily: 1940 > 48 forthcoming exhibition at Steven Kasher Gallery features over 75 black and white vintage photographs. Seeking to emulate the visual punch of Life magazine, PM had the most expensive printing and paper ever used for a daily tabloid – vintage copies of the newspaper will also be displayed.

All photographs and captions courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York City, USA


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



Share this post
Facebook Twitter Linkedin