Posts Tagged ‘White Cube’

Art | Abstract China

Friday, July 15th, 2016

Qian Jiahua
Blue Space, 2016
Acrylic on canvas



The World is Yours, as Well as Ours
White Cube Mason’s Yard
London | UK
15 July > 17 September 2016



Liang Quan
Looking for Another Earth,
2016
Ink, colour and paper collage on canvas
Photo © White Cube (Ben Westoby)



The modernisation policies instituted in the late 1970s by Deng Xiaoping, offered Chinese artists opportunities – albeit limited and carefully-controlled – to explore and learn about the art that was being produced elsewhere in the world. At the same time, they were given the chance to work independently of state commissioning and outside the hitherto exclusively sanctioned socialist realist style. The result was work in a profusion of different styles, including abstraction.

If Kazimir Malevich’s abstract painting Black Square (1915) had symbolically blanked out Russia’s past, Chinese abstract art would develop into a symbolic way of welcoming back China’s.

A selection of contemporary Chinese abstract art goes on show from today at White Cube Mason’s Yard, where it can be seen that in terms of approach and materials, the artists have chosen to reference the values and artistic creations of their own history that had been systematically eradicated during the Cultural Revolution.

Zhou Li
Enjoyment of Water No.5,
2016
Mixed media on canvas



Jiang Zhi
The world is yours, as well as ours – Display 31,
2015>2016
Oil on canvas



Yu Youhan
Abstract 2007.12.1,
2007
Acrylic on canvas



Liang Quan (b 1948), for example, creates mixed media collages that incorporate rice paper and ink as ‘abstract diagrams of traditional Chinese landscape’. Strikingly modern and graphic, Jiang Zhi’s (b 1971) paintings – meticulously rendered copies of the fractured images that occur on computer monitors as a result of data glitches or system errors – nevertheless retain a strong link to traditional Chinese landscape painting. Also influenced by natural surroundings such as the mountainous areas of southern China, free-flowing charcoal lines and ink washes, overlaid with solid arcs and circles of white paint, in delicate, harmonious compositions are features of Zhou Li’s (b 1969) work.

Liu Wentao
Untitled,
2015
Graphite on canvas



On the other hand, Yu Youhan’s (b 1943) ‘Circle’ paintings are an exploration of the ying and yang concept of harmonious unity expressed within Taoism. Liu Wentao (b1973) takes inspiration from a central tenet of Taoism, producing works made with densely drawn pencil lines that interweave to create ambiguity between ‘the concrete and the void’. Liu studied in America, where he saw and was influenced by the minimalist works of Agnes Martin and Ellsworth Kelly. But at other times, as in Qian Jiahua’s (b 1987) spatial compositions that comprise solid blocks of colour, anchored with borders and lines that subtly disrupt the flatness of the image, the Chinese historical references are unclear.

All of the artists included in The World is Yours, as Well as Ours at White Cube Mason’s Yard were born, live and work in China.

All works © the artists, courtesy White Cube


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier


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Exhibitions | Reminder: Don’t Miss These…

Saturday, August 1st, 2015

McDermott & McGough, Those Moments, 1955, 2010
Tricolour carbon print. Courtesy the artists and Cheim & Read, New York.
On show at The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, see below



The Blog team return next week.
Whether you’re staying at home or travelling,
here’s our selection of some of the best
of what’s on show this summer >>>



Doug Aitken, Sunset (black and white), 2011
Hand carved foam, epoxy with LED lights and hand silk-screened acrylic.
Courtesy the artist, 303 Gallery, New York, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich, Victoria Miro Gallery, London and Regen Projects, LA. Photo © Brian Forrest.
On show at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, see below



>>> Until 23 August 2015
Coop Himmelb(l)au
Frankfurt Lyon Dalian

DeutschesArchitekturmuseum (DAM)
Frankfurt | Germany
Vienna-based architectural practice with the long-winded name Coop Himme(l)blau Wolf D Prix & Partner, long-time player on the international architecture scene, founded in 1968 in response to the predominance of rectilinear grids, set out to liberate architecture from its functional confines by rendering space more dynamic and buildings gravity-defying. The exhibition presents three of the studio’s latest projects: the new European Central Bank building (2015) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the Musée des Confluences (2014) in Lyon, France, and the Dalian International Conference Centre in China (2012), see image below.

>>> Auction 28 Aug 2015
Japanese Whisky
Christie’s
Admiralty | Hong Kong
Featuring Hanyu Ichito’s Full Cards Series of 54 bottles of the spirit, each with beautifully-designed individual labels on a playing card theme, which are expected to sell for HK$1.8 m > 2.4 m / £150,000 > 200,000 / US$230,000 > 310,000.

>>> Until 28 August 2015
Joana Vasconcelos:
Material World

Phillips
(Selling exhibition)
London | UK

Forty works representing various periods of sculptor and installation artist Joana Vasconcelos’s career to date, coinciding with the publication of her monograph by Thames & Hudson.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Perfect Likeness:
Photography and Composition

The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles | USA

Having reached a point when everyone thinks he / she is a photographer, and where photography of every possible style and quality pervades every corner of our daily lives, this exhibition looks at the carefully composed images of fine art photographers such as Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, McDermott & McGough and Jeff Wall.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Design Derby:
The Netherlands – Belgium (1815 > 2015)

Museum Boijmans
Van Beuningen

Rotterdam | Netherlands

Like for like Dutch and Belgium design objects – from sumptuous and elegant Belgian art nouveau to the more austere Dutch version, and from the contemporary tours de force of Belgium design to the level-headed Dutch design of today – confront one other in friendly competition.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Fast Fashion
The Shadowy Side of Fashion

Museum für Kunst und
Gewerbe Hamburg

Hamburg | Germany
A critical glimpse behind the scenes of fashion – consumerism, economic interests and ecological issues – throwing light upon fashion and its victims; poverty and affluence; global and local effects; wages and profits; garments and chemicals; clothes and ecology; as well as new fibre technologies.

>>> Until 26 September 2015
Larry Bell 2D-3D:
Glass & Vapor

White Cube, Mason’s Yard
London | UK
Larry Bell (b 1939, Chicago) is a leading exponent of the California ‘Light and Space’ movement. The exhibition includes three early glass installations as well as collages on paper and new, kinetic Light Knot sculptures. To coincide with a major presentation of a Standing Wall installation of thirty-two, six foot square glass panels (c1989 >2014) currently on show at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, USA, at White Cube, Bell has installed 6 x 8 An Improvisation.

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Doug Aitken
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
Following on from his Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening extravaganza at London’s Barbican, The Shirn dedicates its entire exhibition space, inside and out, to the impressive work of American multimedia-artist Doug Aitken, in the most comprehensive solo presentation of his film, music, architecture, performance and sculpture in Germany and elsewhere to date, see image above

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Germaine Krull
A Photographer’s Journey

Jeu de Paume
Paris | France
The idea of the female career photographer – rather than dabbler or dilettante – didn’t properly materialise until free-spirited women such as Gertrude Krull (1897 > 1985) thrust herself headlong into the male-dominated mêlée in the 1920s.



One-sheet poster for Sullivan’s Travels, directed by Preston Sturges, 1941
Poster art direction by Maurice Kallis. Courtesy Sikelia Productions.
On show at MoMA in New York, see below

Dalian International Conference Centre, China, by
Coop Himmelb(l)au Wolf D Prix & Partner, in Vienna, Austria

Photo © Duccio Malagamba.
On show at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt, see above



>>> Until 27 September 2015
What is Luxury?
V&A
London | UK
The world’s biggest museum of the decorative arts and design has a permanent, historic collection of over 4.5 million objects. By definition it is a museum of things, many of which are extremely valuable and considered to be luxurious items. With over 100 objects, ‘From a diamond made from roadkill to a vending machine stocked with DNA, a golden crown for ecclesiastical use to traditional military tailoring, this exhibition addresses how luxury is made and understood in a physical, conceptual and cultural capacity.’

>>> Until September 30
Scorsese Collects [film posters]
Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
In celebration of director Martin Scorsese’s enduring commitment to the preservation of international film culture, MoMA presents 34 works from his collection, centred around a rare, billboard-size poster for the 1951 film Tales of Hoffmann. The exhibition will be accompanied by the film series Scorsese Screens throughout August.

>>> Until 4 October 2015
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires:
Grete Stern & Horacio Coppola

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
The first major exhibition of the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who, in the 1930s, established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic.

>>> Until 18 October 2015
The 80s. Figurative
Painting in West Germany

Städel Museum
Frankfurt | Germany
Shedding light on the new and dynamic figurative painting that developed in the 1980s almost simultaneously in Berlin, Hamburg and the Rhineland. Works by among many other artists, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, and Salomé.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture
for a Modern World

Tate Britain
London | UK
Retrospective of one of Britain’s greatest artists, Barbara Hepworth (1903 > 1975), one of the few women artists to achieve widespread recognition and international prominence, featuring many of her most significant sculptures in wood, stone and bronze alongside her rarely seen works that exemplified modernism from the 1920s onwards.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Gilbert & George:
The Early Years

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
‘It’s not a collaboration. . . We are two people, but one artist,’ say the inseparable British artists, Gilbert and George, who have been creating art together for almost fifty years. This exhibition focuses on their early years, from 1969 to 1975, when the art world around them was largely engaged in pop, minimal, and conceptual work, while the pair developed a wholly unique vision.

>>> Until 26 October 2015
Radikal Moderne Planen
und Bauen im Berlin
der Sechziger Jahre

/ Planning and Building
in Berlin in the 1960s

Berlinische Galerie
Berlin | Germany
Via 300 known works and recently rediscovered material representing 30 architects, planners, photographers and artists, this is the first detailed examination of a decade in architecture and urban planning that shaped a city divided not only by a wall, but also by political ideologies.

>>> Until 31 October 2015
Stone Fenoyl (1945 > 1987).
An Imaginary Geography.
A Documentary Record

Château de Tours
(in association with Jeu de Paume)
Tours | France

Famous for his ability to discover and nurture new photographers, and for his admiration of anonymous 19th century photographs, iconographer, curator, art buyer, gallery and Vu agency (now Viva) founder, Pierre de Fenoyl was the first director of France’s National Foundation Photography in 1976. Champion of the work of Brassai, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Duane Michals and André Kertész, alongside prints, documents, films and publications, this retrospective also shows the black and white landscape photography he created himself from 1984.

>>> Until 1 November 2015
Fotografia Futurista
Galleria Carla Sozzani
Milan | Italy
With over one hundred original photographs, representing the work of over thirty photographers, this exhibition demonstrates how, over a fifty-year period, the futurists took possession of the photographic language and used it as a medium to capture the pulse of early 20th century life. In so doing, they transformed photography into the dynamic, potent and multifaceted force it became in both art and commerce in the twentieth century.

>>> Until 31 January 2016
Shoes: Pleasure and Pain
V&A
London | UK
Exploring the euphoria and obsession they can inspire, more than 200 pairs of historic and contemporary shoes from the V&A’s unrivalled international collection, worn by or associated with high profile figures including Marilyn Monroe, Queen Victoria, Sarah Jessica Parker and the Hon Daphne Guinness are on display. Famous shoes, such as the ballet slippers designed for Moira Shearer in the 1948 film The Red Shoes, are exhibited alongside footwear by 70 named designers including Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Jimmy Choo and Miuccia Prada.



Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Exhibitions | This Summer, Don’t Miss These…

Friday, July 24th, 2015

McDermott & McGough, Those Moments, 1955, 2010
Tricolour carbon print. Courtesy the artists and Cheim & Read, New York.
On show at The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, see below



The Blog team is away.
Whether you stay at
home or go travelling,
h
ere’s our selection of
some of the best of what’s
on show this summer >>>



Doug Aitken, Sunset (black and white), 2011
Hand carved foam, epoxy with LED lights and hand silk-screened acrylic.
Courtesy the artist, 303 Gallery, New York, Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich, Victoria Miro Gallery, London and Regen Projects, LA. Photo © Brian Forrest.
On show at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, see below



>>> Until 23 August 2015
Coop Himmelb(l)au
Frankfurt Lyon Dalian
DeutschesArchitekturmuseum (DAM)
Frankfurt | Germany
Vienna-based architectural practice with the long-winded name Coop Himme(l)blau Wolf D Prix & Partner, long-time player on the international architecture scene, founded in 1968 in response to the predominance of rectilinear grids, set out to liberate architecture from its functional confines by rendering space more dynamic and buildings gravity-defying. The exhibition presents three of the studio’s latest projects: the new European Central Bank building (2015) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the Musée des Confluences (2014) in Lyon, France, and the Dalian International Conference Centre in China (2012), see image below.

>>> Auction 28 Aug 2015
Japanese Whisky
Christie’s
Admiralty | Hong Kong
Featuring Hanyu Ichito’s Full Cards Series of 54 bottles of the spirit, each with beautifully-designed individual labels on a playing card theme, which are expected to sell for HK$1.8 m > 2.4 m / £150,000 > 200,000 / US$230,000 > 310,000.

>>> Until 28 August 2015
Joana Vasconcelos:
Material World
Phillips
(Selling exhibition)
London | UK
Forty works representing various periods of sculptor and installation artist Joana Vasconcelos’s career to date, coinciding with the publication of her monograph by Thames & Hudson.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Perfect Likeness:
Photography and
Composition
The Hammer Museum
Los Angeles | USA

Having reached a point when everyone thinks he / she is a photographer, and where photography of every possible style and quality pervades every corner of our daily lives, this exhibition looks at the carefully composed images of fine art photographers such as Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, McDermott & McGough and Jeff Wall.

>>> Until 13 September 2015
Design Derby:
The Netherlands – Belgium (1815 > 2015)
Museum Boijmans
Van Beuningen
Rotterdam | Netherlands

Like for like Dutch and Belgium design objects – from sumptuous and elegant Belgian art nouveau to the more austere Dutch version, and from the contemporary tours de force of Belgium design to the level-headed Dutch design of today – confront one other in friendly competition.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Fast Fashion
The Shadowy Side of Fashion
Museum für Kunst und
Gewerbe Hamburg

Hamburg | Germany
A critical glimpse behind the scenes of fashion – consumerism, economic interests and ecological issues – throwing light upon fashion and its victims; poverty and affluence; global and local effects; wages and profits; garments and chemicals; clothes and ecology; as well as new fibre technologies.

>>> Until 26 September 2015
Larry Bell 2D-3D:
Glass & Vapor

White Cube, Mason’s Yard
London | UK
Larry Bell (b 1939, Chicago) is a leading exponent of the California ‘Light and Space’ movement. The exhibition includes three early glass installations as well as collages on paper and new, kinetic Light Knot sculptures. To coincide with a major presentation of a Standing Wall installation of thirty-two, six foot square glass panels (c1989 >2014) currently on show at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, USA, at White Cube, Bell has installed 6 x 8 An Improvisation.

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Doug Aitken
Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt
Frankfurt | Germany
Following on from his Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening extravaganza at London’s Barbican, The Shirn dedicates its entire exhibition space, inside and out, to the impressive work of American multimedia-artist Doug Aitken, in the most comprehensive solo presentation of his film, music, architecture, performance and sculpture in Germany and elsewhere to date, see image above

>>> Until 27 September 2015
Germaine Krull
A Photographer’s Journey
Jeu de Paume
Paris | France
The idea of the female career photographer – rather than dabbler or dilettante – didn’t properly materialise until free-spirited women such as Gertrude Krull (1897 > 1985) thrust herself headlong into the male-dominated mêlée in the 1920s.



One-sheet poster for Sullivan’s Travels, directed by Preston Sturges, 1941
Poster art direction by Maurice Kallis. Courtesy Sikelia Productions.
On show at MoMA in New York, see below

Dalian International Conference Centre, China, by
Coop Himmelb(l)au Wolf D Prix & Partner, in Vienna, Austria
Photo © Duccio Malagamba.
On show at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt, see above



>>> Until 27 September 2015
What is Luxury?
V&A
London | UK
The world’s biggest museum of the decorative arts and design has a permanent, historic collection of over 4.5 million objects. By definition it is a museum of things, many of which are extremely valuable and considered to be luxurious items. With over 100 objects, ‘From a diamond made from roadkill to a vending machine stocked with DNA, a golden crown for ecclesiastical use to traditional military tailoring, this exhibition addresses how luxury is made and understood in a physical, conceptual and cultural capacity.’

>>> Until September 30
Scorsese Collects [film posters]
Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
In celebration of director Martin Scorsese’s enduring commitment to the preservation of international film culture, MoMA presents 34 works from his collection, centred around a rare, billboard-size poster for the 1951 film Tales of Hoffmann. The exhibition will be accompanied by the film series Scorsese Screens throughout August.

>>> Until 4 October 2015
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires:
Grete Stern & Horacio Coppola

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
The first major exhibition of the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who, in the 1930s, established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic.

>>> Until 18 October 2015
The 80s. Figurative
Painting in West Germany

Städel Museum
Frankfurt | Germany
Shedding light on the new and dynamic figurative painting that developed in the 1980s almost simultaneously in Berlin, Hamburg and the Rhineland. Works by among many other artists, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, and Salomé.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture
for a Modern World

Tate Britain
London | UK
Retrospective of one of Britain’s greatest artists, Barbara Hepworth (1903 > 1975), one of the few women artists to achieve widespread recognition and international prominence, featuring many of her most significant sculptures in wood, stone and bronze alongside her rarely seen works that exemplified modernism from the 1920s onwards.

>>> Until 25 October 2015
Gilbert & George:
The Early Years

Museum of Modern Art
New York City | USA
‘It’s not a collaboration. . . We are two people, but one artist,’ say the inseparable British artists, Gilbert and George, who have been creating art together for almost fifty years. This exhibition focuses on their early years, from 1969 to 1975, when the art world around them was largely engaged in pop, minimal, and conceptual work, while the pair developed a wholly unique vision.

>>> Until 26 October 2015
Radikal Moderne Planen
und Bauen im Berlin
der Sechziger Jahre
/
Planning and Building
in Berlin in the 1960s

Berlinische Galerie
Berlin | Germany
Via 300 known works and recently rediscovered material representing 30 architects, planners, photographers and artists, this is the first detailed examination of a decade in architecture and urban planning that shaped a city divided not only by a wall, but also by political ideologies.

>>> Until 31 October 2015
Stone Fenoyl (1945 > 1987).
An Imaginary Geography.
A Documentary Record
Château de Tours
(in association with Jeu de Paume)
Tours | France
Famous for his ability to discover and nurture new photographers, and for his admiration of anonymous 19th century photographs, iconographer, curator, art buyer, gallery and Vu agency (now Viva) founder, Pierre de Fenoyl was the first director of France’s National Foundation Photography in 1976. Champion of the work of Brassai, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Duane Michals and André Kertész, alongside prints, documents, films and publications, this retrospective also shows the black and white landscape photography he created himself from 1984.

>>> Until 1 November 2015
Fotografia Futurista
Galleria Carla Sozzani
Milan | Italy
With over one hundred original photographs, representing the work of over thirty photographers, this exhibition demonstrates how, over a fifty-year period, the futurists took possession of the photographic language and used it as a medium to capture the pulse of early 20th century life. In so doing, they transformed photography into the dynamic, potent and multifaceted force it became in both art and commerce in the twentieth century.

>>> Until 31 January 2016
Shoes: Pleasure and Pain
V&A
London | UK
Exploring the euphoria and obsession they can inspire, more than 200 pairs of historic and contemporary shoes from the V&A’s unrivalled international collection, worn by or associated with high profile figures including Marilyn Monroe, Queen Victoria, Sarah Jessica Parker and the Hon Daphne Guinness are on display. Famous shoes, such as the ballet slippers designed for Moira Shearer in the 1948 film The Red Shoes, are exhibited alongside footwear by 70 named designers including Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Jimmy Choo and Miuccia Prada.


Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us that we think might interest you.

The Blog’s publishers insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees that may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Art | Beatriz Milhazes takes Rio to Hong Kong

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Turkish garden, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



Beatriz Milhazes
White Cube Hong Kong
Hong Kong
People’s Republic of China
13 March > 30 May 2015



Beatriz Milhazes
Photo Christian Gaul



Beatriz Milhazes’ studio, where she has worked since 1987, is adjacent to Rio de Janeiro’s botanical gardens, and for this latest series of mixed media works, the artist has allowed the exuberant jungle foliage to creep inside, to spread over and mingle with her collection of collaging materials, carrying choice finds along with it to decorate – with her helping hand – the surfaces of the cardboard sheets she uses as her baseboard, thereby producing a group of multi-layered, remarkably vibrant works – a unique abstracted celebration of 21st century Brazil’s tropical splendour and the natural world – opulent compositions which blend mix all manner of influences, most noticeably in this instance from Matisse – in cut-out mode – whose presence extends across much of the show, and is perhaps most apparent in the combination of colours and cut-out shapes in O passeio, (The ride, or The tour).

Yellow sunshine, 2014
Mixed media – Collage of various papers
and acrylic paint on cardboard



Referencing the collage technique invented by the early 20th century cubists, Turkish garden, includes chocolate wafer biscuit wrappers, cut into leaf shapes, as well as rose-patterned, holographic, spotted and striped wrapping papers. The central, river-like horizontal axis of Yellow sunshine gives more than a nod to Sonia Delauney, and in Jardim Kadiwéu (Garden of the Kadiwéu) Milhazes pays homage to local and world-famous painter, printmaker, ecologist, naturalist, artist, musician and landscape architect, Roberto Burle Marx – designer of the undulating op art Copacabana promenade mosaic (completed 1970). Elsewhere, Emilio Pucci patterns reflecting 1960s and 70s glamour overlay radiant colours and textures suggestive of the wild exuberance of the Rio carnival.

Jardim Kadiwéu, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



O Passeio, 2014
Collage of various papers on cardboard



Beatriz Milhazes (b 1960 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) has had numerous international solo exhibitions, including those at Pérez Art Museum / Miami /USA (2014 > 2015), Museu Oscar Niemeyer / Curbita / Brazil (2013), Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation / Lisbon / Portugal (2011), Fondation Cartier/ Paris / France (2009). In 2003, she represented Brazil at the Venice Biennale. As well as the forms and patterns of flowers and leaf shapes that find their way into her painting and mixed media oeuvre, Milhazes has incorporated the rich atmosphere of Rio via its cheap, colourful fabrics and jewellery, its embroidery and folk art, and references to its rich and multi-facetted urban architectural mix.

Mysterious and dream-like, there is no real centre to one of her works. For Milhazes, composition is never static. She wants the viewer’s eyes to move continually across her creations, ‘…That way’, she says, ‘I feel like you have communication with the entire world.’ And, perhaps, in these works in her eponymous show Beatriz Milhazes at White Cube Hong Kong, her intention is to do just that. Beneath the obvious ostentation, there would seem to lurk a far less frivolous intention. Through what might appear as her blithe inclusion of elements such as the mass-produced and ubiquitously discarded, biscuit wrappers, her purpose may be to draw attention, however subliminally, to the threat posed by man to his environment, in which much of the rarer flora is in danger of disappearing from the natural world, and is destined to survive only in our botanical gardens. Poignantly, the remaining 1,400 Kadiwéureferred to above in the title of the work Jardim Kadiwéu – are the last surviving group of Mbayá, a once large and powerful tribe that controlled large parts of Brazil and are now confined to life on a reservation.

All works © Beatriz Milhazes
All images Courtesy White Cube
All works photographed by Motivo,
except Yellow sunshine,
photographed by Pepe Schettino



Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances whatsoever, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier



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Sculpture | Everything as Nothing at White Cube

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Rachel Kneebone, 399 Days, 2012-2013
Porcelain and mild steel
540 x 287 x 283 cm



Rachel Kneebone
399 Days
White Cube Bermondsey
London | UK
18th July > 28th September 2014



From today until the end of September White Cube Bermonsey’’s main South Galleries and North Galleries spaces will be devoted to showing Gilbert & George’s powerful, new SCAPGOATING PICTURES for LONDON series, while in stark contrast, the serene top-lit, 9 x 9 x 9 gallery space (81m²), at the centre of the building, plays host to a single, monumental, delicate and intricate, ivory-white porcelain-tiled piece by Rachel Kneebone.

Visual references abound – in the exquisite handling of the human form, of course it is Rodin, with whom Kneebone shares an interest in the the representation of vitality, mourning, ecstacy and death, but, at the same time, there is something of Hieronymous Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights, c 1500, in the concept. In terms of the architectural scale of the piece, she takes inspiration from the 19th century plaster cast of Trajan’s Column at London’s V&A Museum, while reminders of interior details from late baroque churches are apparent. These potent ingredients are blended together, manipulated, played around with to produce a coherent, magnificent whole. The finish, as it should be, with work of this quality that relies on the same material as its base,  is similar to that of Meissen figurines. 399 Days represents the largest and most ambitious installation the artist has produced to date.

Attractive, repellant, huge and complex in form, the surface packed with writhing, entangled and interlocked headless, naked bodies melting one into another, the work is seemingly an embodiment of humanity in its rawest state, but paradoxically, via excess and overabundance, in 399 Days at White Cube Bermondsey, Rachel Kneebone seeks to express nothingness, more demonstrably as less, everything as nothing.

Photos Stephen White, © Rachel Kneebone
Courtesy White Cube



Tell us what you think
The Blog is about art, architecture, books, design and gardens, and anything else that currently interests us which we think might interest you.

The publishers of The Blog insist that all images supplied for publication in our posts are cleared for that use before being sent to us. Whether pictures are sent to us as email attachments or made available as downloadable files, any responsibility for fees which may, under any circumstances, fall due, must be borne by the source supplier





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Art | Long Day’s Journey into Night

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Fullmoon@Cape Verde, 2013
C-print



Darren Almond:
To Leave a Light Impression
White Cube
South Galleries, Bermondsey, London, UK
22nd January –13th April, 2014

The White Cube press release for Wigan-born Darren Almond’s forthcoming exhibition at their Bermondsey gallery, tells us he ‘lives and works in London’, which is somewhat misleading. From his London base, Almond travelled back and forth across the globe, visiting every continent over a period of thirteen years to create his Fullmoon series of photographs. These, together with his Present Form series and a group of small bronze sculptures, will be included in the show.

To Almond, who has a deep connection to landscapes – their geology, myth and history – travel is elemental. The Arctic Circle, Siberia, the holy mountains in China and the source of the Nile have all drawn him. Time and duration, place, personal history, and collective memory are the palette from which he creates his sculptures, films, photographs, and works on paper. In terms of execution, sometimes his concepts are relatively simple and at other times far more complex. For Terminus, Almond negotiated the relocation of the original bus shelters of the town of Oswiecim (formerly Auschwitz) to make an emotive installation about historical loss. Tide, in which 600 digital clocks were lined up along a wall, simultaneously registering the relentless passage of time, evoked the ‘clocking in and clocking out’ procedure of factory workers.

Present Form: Ceithir, 2013
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Fullmoon@Cerro Chaltén, 2013
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The works in the Darren Almond: To Leave a Light Impression show at White Cube are the product of Almond’s journeys to Patagonia, Tasmania, the Cape Verde Islands and the Outer Hebrides.

In 1998, Almond began making a series of landscape photographs, which he calls Fullmoons. Each were taken during a full moon in diverse and remote geographical locations. These images, made possible by harnessing the moonlight and using exposures times of 15 minutes or more, appear ghostly, bathed in an unexpectedly brilliant light, as if night has been transformed into day.

His Patagonia pictures – referencing romantic landscape painting – employ classical compositions. Suffused with an apparently supernatural light – the result of the lack of airborne pollution – devoid of any signs of the hand of man, the terrain appears immaculate, timeless.

The passing of time and man’s need to measure it are the subject of Pesent Form, for which Almond photographed 4,000-year-old, ravaged and moss-covered standing stones and circles, on the Isle of Lewis and on the Outer Hebrides. Whereas, the outcrops of black solidified lava, that appear to be still smouldering, in his large-scale photographs taken on the volcanic Cape Verde Islands, off the west coast of Africa, bear witness to their raging, seething birth.

Since his own beginning as an artist, Almond’s work has appeared in countless exhibitions around the world, and has won major art prizes. His films have been shown in biennales from Tel Aviv in Israel to Palm Beach, Florida. Among others, Almond has had one-man shows at London’s Tate Britain, Zürich’s Kunsthalle, the de Appel Centre for Contemporary Art in Amsterdam, at the University of Chicago, at Düsseldorf’s K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, and at SITE Santa Fe. A finalist in the 2005 Turner Prize, Almond also participated in the 2003 Venice Biennale. In 2011 his work was featured on a billboard in New York City overlooking Chelsea’s High Line Park. Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin put on his All Things Pass exhibition in 2012, and his Hemispheres and Continents show at Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, last year, was shown in Madrid and Japan.

All Images © Darren Almond, except portrait ©Richard Dawson
Courtesy White Cub
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